Karine Salin

Karine Salin
Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer | Ifremer · Department of Environment and Resources

PhD

About

59
Publications
11,889
Reads
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1,418
Citations
Introduction
I focus on integrative approaches from molecules to the whole-organism to investigate how physiological mechanisms underlie life-history trajectories in wild animals. I am combining three specific lines of research: How mitochondrial functioning affects energy flux through the organism. How cellular and whole-organism metabolism are linked to oxidative balance. Examining whether energy metabolism and oxidative stress are proximate causes of life histories.
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Research Associate
June 2012 - June 2013
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2008 - November 2011
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • The relationship between mitochondrial efficiency, oxidative balance and growth in amphibians.

Publications

Publications (59)
Article
Full-text available
In recent years evolutionary ecologists have become increasingly interested in the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the life-histories of animals. ROS levels have mostly been inferred indirectly due to the limitations of estimating ROS from in vitro methods. However, measuring ROS (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) content in vivo is now possible...
Article
Full-text available
It is often assumed that an animal's metabolic rate can be estimated through measuring the whole-organism oxygen consumption rate. However, oxygen consumption alone is unlikely to be a sufficient marker of energy metabolism in many situations. This is due to the inherent variability in the link between oxidation and phosphorylation; that is, the am...
Article
Full-text available
The use of tissue homogenate has greatly aided the study of the functioning of mitochondria. However, the amount of ATP produced per oxygen molecule consumed, that is, the effective P/O ratio, has never been measured directly in tissue homogenate. Here we combine and refine existing methods previously used in permeabilized cells and isolated mitoch...
Article
Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) typically vary two-or threefold among conspecifics, with both traits assumed to significantly impact fitness. However, the underlying mechanisms that determine such intraspecific variation are not well understood. We examined the influence of mitochondrial properties on intraspecific va...
Article
Full-text available
Animals, especially ectotherms, are highly sensitive to the temperature of their surrounding environment. Extremely high temperature, for example, induces a decline of average performance of conspecifics within a population, but individual heterogeneity in the ability to cope with elevating temperatures has rarely been studied. In this study, we ex...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondrial metabolism varies significantly between individuals of the same species and can influence animal performance, such as growth. However, growth rate is usually determined before the mitochondrial assay. The hypothesis that natural variation in mitochondrial metabolic traits is linked to differences in both previous and upcoming growth r...
Article
It has been assumed that at the whole organismal level, the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is proportional to the oxygen consumption. Recently, a number of researchers have challenged this assumption, based on the observation that the ROS production per unit oxygen consumed in the resting state of mitochondrial respiration i...
Article
Aerobic metabolism of aquatic ectotherms is highly sensitive to fluctuating climates. Many mitochondrial traits exhibit phenotypic plasticity in response to acute variations in temperature and oxygen availability. These responses are critical for understanding the effects of environmental variations on aquatic ectotherms' performance. Using the Eur...
Article
Biologists have long appreciated the critical role energy turnover plays in understanding variation in performance and fitness among individuals. Whole-organism metabolic studies have provided key insights into fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes. However, constraints operating at subcellular levels—such as those operating within the...
Article
An important, but underappreciated, consequence of climate change is the reduction in crucial nutrient production at the base of the marine food chain: the long-chain omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFA). This can have dramatic consequences on consumers, such as fish as they have limited capacity to synthesise n-3 HUFA de novo. The n-3...
Article
The physiological causes of intraspecific differences in fitness components such as growth rate are currently a source of debate. It has been suggested that differences in energy metabolism may drive variation in growth, but it remains unclear whether covariation between growth rates and energy metabolism is: (i) a result of certain individuals acq...
Article
Full-text available
Animals display tremendous variation in their rates of growth, reproductive output, and longevity. While the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlie this variation remain poorly understood, the performance of the mitochondrion has emerged as a key player. Mitochondria not only impact the performance of eukaryotes via their capacity to...
Poster
There is increasing evidence that climate change critically depletes crucial nutrients in food web. In particular, a reduction in the production of Omega 3 fatty acids in microalgae as a result of climate change can alter the fatty acid composition of biological membranes of consumers. This is particularly true for marine fish as they are unable to...
Article
Mitochondrial efficiency is typically taken to represent an animal's capacity to convert its resources into ATP. However, the term mitochondrial efficiency, as currently used in the literature, can be calculated as either the respiratory control ratio, RCR (ratio of mitochondrial respiration supporting ATP synthesis to that required to offset the p...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals experience periods of food shortage in their natural environment. It has been hypothesised that the metabolic responses of animals to naturally‐occurring periods of food deprivation may have long‐term negative impacts on their subsequent life‐history. In particular, reductions in energy requirements in response to fasting may help pres...
Data
Body mass-specific daily rations of brown trout (Salmo trutta) at 3 consecutive test temperatures.
Article
Organisms can modify their surrounding environment, but whether these changes are large enough to feed back and alter their evolutionary trajectories is not well understood, particularly in wild populations. Here we show that nutrient pulses from decomposing Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parents alter selection pressures on their offspring with imp...
Article
Metabolic rate has been linked to growth, reproduction, and survival at the individual level and is thought to have far reaching consequences for the ecology and evolution of organisms. However, metabolic rates must be consistent (i.e. repeatable) over at least some portion of the lifetime in order to predict their longer-term effects on population...
Article
Full-text available
Energy stores are essential for the overwinter survival of many temperate and polar animals, but individuals within a species often differ in how quickly they deplete their reserves. These disparities in overwinter performance may be explained by differences in their physiological and behavioral flexibility in response to food scarcity. However, li...
Article
Full-text available
[ Biol. Lett. 12 , 20160586. (Published online 18 October 2016) ([doi:10.1098/rsbl.2016.0586][2])][2] The caption for [figure 1][2] fails to indicate which graph is for which trait, meaning that the figure was unclear. The caption was also erroneously duplicated. The corrected caption is presented
Article
Metabolic rates reflect the energetic cost of living but exhibit remarkable variation among conspecifics, partly as a result of the constraints imposed by environmental conditions. Metabolic rates are sensitive to changes in temperature and oxygen availability, but effects of food availability, particularly on maximum metabolic rates, are not well...
Article
Full-text available
Social factors have important effects on individuals’ fitness, yet the proximate mechanisms remain virtually unknown. Oxidative stress, which results from the imbalance between the systemic effect of reactive oxygen species on molecules and an organism’s capacity to restore oxidative balance, is one potential mechanism mediating such effects. Altho...
Data
Fig. S2. Relationship between critical swimming speed (U crit) and mean pectoral fin use during aerobically powered swimming in female guppies reared for 5 months with exposure to varying levels of male harassment. Each data point represents one individual (n = 8 per treatment). Filled circles = low harassment females; open circles = high harassmen...
Data
Fig. S1. Comparison the remaining aerobic scope, after accounting for the costs of locomotion, while swimming at various speeds for females guppies reared for 5 months with exposure to varying levels of male harassment (n = 10 per treatment). Filled circles = low harassment females; open circles = high harassment females.
Data
Table S1. Morphological comparisons between female guppies reared for several months with exposure to varying levels of male harassment (n = 8 per treatment).
Article
Full-text available
Metabolic rate has been linked to multiple components of fitness and is both heritable and repeatable to a certain extent. However, its repeatability can differ among studies, even after controlling for the time interval between measurements. Some of this variation in repeatability may be due to the relative stability of the environmental condition...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximal metabolic rate (MMR) typically vary 2-3 fold amongst individual animals of the same species, size and life history stage, despite these traits being presumed to have a significant impact on fitness. Yet, the underlying physiological differences that determine such intraspecific variation in metabolism are l...
Article
Links between metabolism and components of fitness such as growth, reproduction and survival can depend on food availability. A high standard metabolic rate (SMR; baseline energy expenditure) or aerobic scope (AS; the difference between an individual's maximum and SMR) is often beneficial when food is abundant or easily accessible but can be less i...
Article
Full-text available
Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns aspects of investment in the soma that influence sur...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing interest in the effect of energy metabolism on oxidative stress, but much ambiguity over the relationship between the rate of oxygen consumption and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS (such as hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) in the mitochondria is primarily inferred indirectly from measurements in vitro,...
Article
Full-text available
Body size is a central biological parameter affecting most biological processes (especially energetics) and mitochondria is a key organelle controlling metabolism and is also the cell's main source of chemical energy. However, the link between body size and mitochondrial function is still unclear, especially in ectotherms. In this study, we investi...
Data
Full-text available
These 2 slides are in complement of the article (but not related to its publication - it is just explanation). They show two classical (but not the only once) methods of P/O ratio on isolated mitochondria: ADP/O ratio is a measure of the amount of oxygen consumed for a known amount of ADP consumption. ATP/O ratio is a simultaneous measure of the r...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual coercion of females by males is widespread across sexually reproducing species. It stems from a conflict of interest over reproduction and exerts selective pressure on both sexes. For females, there is often a significant energetic cost of exposure to male sexually coercive behaviours. Our understanding of the efficiency of female resistance...
Article
1.Phenotypic flexibility in physiological, morphological, and behavioural traits can allow organisms to cope with environmental challenges. Given recent climate change and the degree of habitat modification currently experienced by many organisms, it is therefore critical to quantify the degree of phenotypic variation present within populations, in...
Article
1. Metabolic rates can vary as much as 3-fold among individuals of the same size and age in a population, but why such variation persists is unclear given that they determine the energetic cost of living. Relationships between standard metabolic rate (SMR), growth and survival can vary with environmental conditions, suggesting that the fitness cons...
Article
Full-text available
Phthalates are synthetic contaminants released into the environment notably by plastic waste. Semi-volatile, they adsorb to atmospheric particles and get distributed in all ecosystems. Effects of this major anthropogenic pollution in economical species in aquatic habitats have attracted large interest. On the contrary, very few studies have focused...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Current reproductive effort typically comes at a cost to future reproductive value by altering somatic function (e.g., growth or self-maintenance). Furthermore, effects of reproduction often depend on both fecundity and stage of reproduction, wherein allocation of resources into additional offspring and/or stages of reproduction results in...
Article
An organism’s size, known to affect biological structures and processes from cellular metabolism to population dynamics, depends upon the duration and rate of growth. However, it is still poorly understood how mitochondrial function affects the energetic basis of growth, especially in ec-totherms, which represent a hugemajority of animal biodiversi...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondria are known to play a central role in life history processes, being the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which promote oxidative constraint. Surprisingly, although the main role of the mitochondria is to produce ATP, the plasticity of mitochondrial ATP generation has received little attention in life history studies. Yet, mi...
Thesis
Le concept de compromis évolutif est central dans la compréhension de l'évolution des histoires de vie ; cependant, les mécanismes sous-jacents sont encore peu compris. Généralement, les études physiologiques sur les compromis d'histoire de vie ont porté sur les phénomènes d'allocation des ressources. Depuis une dizaine d'année, plusieurs études su...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of liver and gastrocnemius muscle mitochondria in thermoneutral and cold-acclimated ducklings. The yield of oxidative phosphorylation was lower in muscle than in liver mitochondria, a difference that was associated with a higher proton conductance in muscle mitochondria. Cold exposure did not...
Article
Full-text available
Subterranean animals have commonly evolved hypoactivity, hypometabolism and/or the sequential use of energetic reserves to tolerate long fasting periods imposed by the low food levels found in subterranean environments. However, some tropical caves are characterized by a potential high level of nutriments. By using the tropical fish Astyanax fascia...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
1) Determine individual variation in tolerance of hypoxia and acute warming in juveniles European sea bass and reveal cross-tolerance 2) Test that relative tolerance depends on individual's instrinsic respiratory physiology 3) Evaluate links between tolerance and mitochondria respiration 4) Examine tolerance trades-off against important individual traits such as growth efficiency 5) Establish the genomic links between maintenance metabolism and hypoxia tolerance and obtain the heritability for these two traits