Kara Layton

Kara Layton
University of Aberdeen | ABDN · School of Biological Sciences

PhD Marine Biology

About

41
Publications
12,703
Reads
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527
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Marine Biology at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen. https://www.laytonlab.com/
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - April 2020
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - December 2018
University of Western Australia
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2015 - present
Western Australian Museum
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
January 2015 - December 2018
September 2010 - February 2013
University of Guelph
Field of study
September 2005 - December 2009
University of Guelph
Field of study

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Despite widespread biodiversity losses, an understanding of how most taxa will respond to future climate change is lacking. Here we integrate genomics and environmental modelling to assess climate change responses in an ecologically and economically important Arctic species. Environmentally associated genomic diversity and machine learning are used...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogenetic inference and species delimitation can be challenging in taxonomic groups that have recently radiated and where introgression produces conflicting gene trees, especially when species delimitation has traditionally relied on mitochondrial data and color pattern. Chromodoris, a genus of colorful and toxic nudibranch in the Indo‐Pacific,...
Article
Chromodoris is a genus of colourful nudibranchs that feed on sponges and is found across the Indo-Pacific. While this was once the most diverse chromodorid genus, recent work has shown that the genus should be restricted to a monophyletic lineage that contains only 22 species, all of which exhibit black pigmentation and planar spawning behaviour. E...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Marine invertebrates are abundant and diverse on the continental shelf in Antarctica, but little is known about their parasitic counterparts. Endoparasites are especially understudied because they often possess highly modified body plans that pose problems for their identification. Asterophila, a genus of endoparasitic gastropod in the...
Poster
Full-text available
A comprehensive understanding of population connectivity in marine species is required for sustainable, ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. The black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla is a conservation priority seabird of international importance. Historic analyses demonstrate that kittiwakes emigrate over short and long distances, yet there r...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based conservation that includes carbon sinks, alongside a linked carbon credit system, as part of a nature-based solution to combating climate change, could help reduce greenhouse gas levels and therefore the impact of their emissions. Blue carbon habitats and pathways can also facilitate biodiversity retention, aiding sustainable fisher...
Article
Full-text available
A key component of the global blue economy strategy is the sustainable extraction of marine resources and conservation of marine environments through networks of marine protected areas (MPAs). Connectivity and representativity are essential factors that underlie successful implementation of MPA networks, which can safeguard biological diversity and...
Article
The potentially significant genetic consequences associated with the loss of migratory capacity of diadromous fishes that have become landlocked in freshwater are poorly understood. Consistent selective pressures associated with freshwater residency may drive repeated differentiation both between allopatric landlocked and anadromous populations and...
Article
Predicting how species will respond to future climate change is of central importance in the midst of the global biodiversity crisis, and recent work has demonstrated the utility of population genomics for improving these predictions. Here, we suggest a broadening of the approach to include other types of genomic variants that play an important rol...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus are a commercially and culturally valued species for northern Indigenous peoples. Climate shifts could have important implications for charr and those that rely on them, but studies that evaluate responses to ecosystem change and the spatial scales at which they occur are rare. We compare marine-phase habitat use, lo...
Article
Full-text available
Characterizing the nature of genetic differentiation among individuals and populations and its distribution across the genome is increasingly important to inform both conservation and management of exploited species. Atlantic Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) is an ecologically and commercially important fish species, yet knowledge of population...
Article
The post-glacial colonization of Gander Lake in Newfoundland, Canada, by Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus) provides the opportunity to study the genomic basis of adaptation to extreme deep-water environments. Colonization of deep-water (> 50 m) habitats often requires extensive adaptation to cope with novel environmental challenges from high hydros...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-021-01023-8.
Preprint
Full-text available
Many marine species use different habitats at different stages of their life cycle. Functional connectivity, the degree to which the seascape facilitates or impedes movement between habitat patches, is poorly studied in marine systems. We reviewed the scientific literature to explore the various barriers preventing functional connectivity between m...
Article
Full-text available
Science-based management of marine fisheries and effective ecosystem monitoring both require the analysis of large amounts of often complex and difficult to collect information. Legislation also increasingly requires the attainment of good environmental status, which again demands collection of data to enable efficient monitoring and management of...
Article
Science-based management of marine fisheries and effective ecosystem monitoring both require the analysis of large amounts of often complex and difficult to collect information. Legislation also increasingly requires the attainment of good environmental status, which again demands collection of data to enable efficient monitoring and management of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The ICES Working Group on Application of Genetics in Fisheries and Aquaculture (WGAGFA) is composed of 51 members from 17 ICES Member States. There is a high level of commitment by the WGAGFA members to their group: During the WGAGFA cycle 2018 to 2020, the annual working group meetings were attended in average by 26 delegates from 11 ICES Member S...
Article
The genetic underpinnings of incipient speciation, including the genomic mechanisms which contribute to morphological and ecological differentiation and reproductive isolation, remain poorly understood. The repeated evolution of consistently, phenotypically distinct morphs of Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus) within the Quaternary period offer an i...
Article
Full-text available
The resiliency of populations and species to environmental change is dependent on the maintenance of genetic diversity, and as such quantifying diversity is central to combatting ongoing wide spread reductions in biodiversity. With the advent of next‐generation sequencing, several methods now exist for resolving fine‐scale population structure, but...
Article
Full-text available
The reliable taxonomic identification of organisms through DNA sequence data requires a well parameterized library of curated reference sequences. However, it is estimated that just 15% of described animal species are represented in public sequence repositories. To begin to address this deficiency, we provide DNA barcodes for 1,500,003 animal speci...
Article
Microgastropods in the subclass Caenogastropoda are diverse and species‐rich and often exhibit similar morphologies across families, posing difficulties for species identification. Spirostyliferina Bandel, 2006 is a microgastropod genus that has been placed in the family Litiopidae associated with algae and seagrass across the tropical Indo‐Pacific...
Preprint
Full-text available
The reliable taxonomic identification of organisms through DNA sequence data requires a well parameterized library of curated reference sequences. However, it is estimated that just 15% of described animal species are represented in public sequence repositories. To begin to address this deficiency, we provide DNA barcodes for 1,500,003 animal speci...
Article
ABSTRACT: Genetic interactions (i.e. hybridization) between wild and escaped Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from aquaculture operations have been widely documented, yet the ability to incorporate predictions of risk into aquaculture siting advice has been limited. Here we demonstrate a model-based approach to assessing these potential genetic interact...
Thesis
Our understanding of the diversity and evolution of many marine invertebrates is lacking, especially in the mega-diverse Mollusca. Molecular tools now provide a wealth of approaches for exploring evolutionary patterns. In this thesis I generate mitochondrial and exon capture-based nuclear phylogenies of lndo-Pacific Chromodoris nudibranchs, present...
Article
Full-text available
Global identification and monitoring programs for invasive species aim to reduce imminent impacts to biodiversity, ecosystem services, agriculture and human health. This study employs a 658 base pair fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene to identify and categorize clades of the banded grove snail (Cepaea nemoralis (Linnaeus, 175...
Article
Full-text available
DNA barcoding has proven an effective tool for species identification in varied groups of marine invertebrates including crustaceans, molluscs, polychaetes and echinoderms. In this study, we further validate its utility by analyzing almost half of the 300 species of Echinoder-mata known from Canadian waters. COI sequences from 999 specimens were as...
Data
Specimens used in this study. List of BOLD sample IDs, process IDs, GenBank accession numbers, and institution storing for each specimen in the dataset DS-COIECH dx.doi.org/10.5883/DS-COIECH on BOLD. *sequences lacking a BIN ID (PDF)
Data
Locality information for each BIN. List of BINs with corresponding species ID, number of individuals, and locality information. Localities from a particular province/territory are separated by a comma, while semi-colon separates those from another province/territory. Species with multiple BIN assignments are in BOLD. Locality codes are as follows:...
Data
Intraspecific distances. List of 113 species with two or more individuals and their corresponding mean and maximum intraspecific distances (%K2P). (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Larval development has strong impacts on dispersal potential and gene flow among populations of marine invertebrates. However, Pleistocene glaciations have also played an important role in shaping population structure in benthic taxa in the Northern Hemisphere, even those with planktotrophic larvae. Each glacial advance tended to fragment species d...
Article
This study used fatty acid trophic markers (FATMs) to assess carbon sources of the bivalve Bathyarca glacialis and describe the pelagic–benthic coupling in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Four regions characterized by contrasting trophic environments were investigated: Southeastern Beaufort Sea, Victoria Strait, Lancaster Sound and Northern Baffin...
Article
Full-text available
Background Comprehensive biotic surveys, or ‘all taxon biodiversity inventories’ (ATBI), have traditionally been limited in scale or scope due to the complications surrounding specimen sorting and species identification. To circumvent these issues, several ATBI projects have successfully integrated DNA barcoding into their identification procedures...
Article
Full-text available
Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful f...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I've generated a tanglegram in Dendroscope but would like to then use this tanglegram to run event-based reconciliation analysis in Jane. The input file for Jane however is a tanglegram in .tgl or .nex format that includes a parasite block, host block and distributions block (connections between host and parasite). It's not possible to export a tanglegram in .tgl format from Dendroscope and the .nex file exported from Dendroscope doesn't include the distributions block. Does anyone know if there is a program that will allow me to generate and export a tanglegram in the proper format for Jane? Or do I just have to manually edit the nexus I export from Dendroscope? Thanks so much in advance for your help!
Question
I'm currently trying to amplify 2 mitochondrial genes (COI, 16S) and 3 nuclear genes (H3, 28S, 18S) for a species of marine micromollusc. I'm able to get H3, 28S and 18S to work but I can't successfully amplify COI. I've designed primers, as well as trying universal primers, and using several different PCR regimes (mostly bottom-up approaches with annealing temps ranging from 40C to 50C), but nothing seems to work. Could this be a problem with low DNA yield given that it's a tiny micromollusc?
Thanks in advance for your help!

Network

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Projects

Projects (10)
Project
Sub-Antarctic Islands, unlike the Antarctic continent, are typically managed by individual countries and don’t fall under a treaty system. As a consequence, science coordination is less well-developed in the region than in the Antarctic Treaty area. Moreover, the significance of the islands themselves are frequently overlooked in global discussions on climate change in polar environments. To address important knowledge gaps and scientific priorities for the sub-Antarctic and pave the way for increased research coordination, the South Atlantic Research Institute (SAERI) organised a Symposium on Sub-Antarctic connections and climate change hosted at Wilton Park in October 2021, ahead of COP26. Symposium discussions led to the creation of a sub-Antarctic blue carbon and natural archives (such as ice-core, corals, peat-core and fjord geology) network of ~30 researchers working in the region, across career stages, nationalities and disciplines - to elucidate our understanding of blue carbon in the past, present and future.
Project
How are breeding colonies of kittiwake are connected? Funders: UKRI NERC SUPER DTP 2021, MASTS-SFC SERS 2022
Project
Multi-disciplinary research in coastal Labrador in support of Nunatsiavut's Imappivut marine spatial plan.