Kaitlyn Burnell

Kaitlyn Burnell
Duke University | DU · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

About

20
Publications
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139
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
There is fear that adolescents have limited control over their digital technology use. The current research examines longitudinal (Study 1) and daily (Study 2) associations between U.S. adolescents' self-control and digital technological impairment and use. Using a large sample (N = 2,104; Wave 1: Mage = 12.36, 52% female, 57% economically disadvan...
Article
In a community sample of emerging adults ( N = 232), this study (a) assessed participants’ exposure to and postings about alcohol, cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and marijuana across social media platforms, (b) investigated how exposure to and posting about text versus visual substance-related content differentially relate to one’s own use, and (c) test...
Article
The past decade saw a sharp increase in the use of smartphones and digital communication platforms. This manuscript reviews advancements in the study of digital communication and adolescent development over the last decade. We highlight theoretical models that seek to explain the power of digital media in adolescents’ lives. We then examine researc...
Article
Adolescents are immersed in an appearance culture sustained by their peers, which includes being exposed to norms and expectations of physical attractiveness. A new avenue for transmitting these appearance messages may be digital technologies, including text messaging. Little is known about how appearance messages may naturalistically occur in adol...
Article
Purpose Although studies have found associations between greater digital technology use and poorer sleep health among adolescents, these studies typically rely on self-reported sleep and cross-sectional designs. This study applied an ecological momentary assessment design to examine how adolescents’ daily digital technology use relates to self-repo...
Article
Despite strong concerns that sexting poses risks for adolescents’ well-being, previous research finds mixed results. Moreover, these studies rely heavily on self-report measures and cross-sectional designs. This study utilizes observational methods to examine longitudinal relations between text-based sexting and both negative and positive indicator...
Article
Frequent use of highly visual online platforms such as Instagram may be linked to greater body image concerns. One prominent feature of Instagram is the ability to receive feedback in the form of likes and comments. The goal of this cross-sectional study (conducted in laboratory and online) was to examine college students' receipt of appearance com...
Article
People are generally poor reporters of time spent using digital technology. Advancing smartphone features, such as the iOS Screen Time application, allow researchers to obtain more objective measurements of digital technology use. Truth and Bias models were used to test how self-reported social networking site use aligns with device-reported use as...
Article
Background: As e-cigarette use rises among U.S. adolescents, the need to understand its risk factors becomes increasingly urgent. If the risk profile of adolescents who exclusively use e-cigarettes differs from those who use traditional tobacco products and dual users, prevention and intervention efforts would need to target such differences. Metho...
Article
Snapchat allows users to apply lenses to photographic content, with these lenses often enhancing physical appearance. This may lead users to adopt unrealistic ideals of physical appearance. In a two-part study with college students, this investigation explored associations between general use of Snapchat lenses and body image concerns, and experime...
Article
Purpose The aim of the study was to examine the concurrent and longitudinal associations between adolescents' text messaging frequency and mental health symptoms across 4 years of high school. Methods A total of 203 adolescents (aged 14–18 years) consented and were provided smartphones across 4 years of high school. Using billing records, daily fr...
Article
Full-text available
Social networking sites (SNSs) may be transforming young people's social experiences, and browsing SNSs in particular may harm psychological well-being. However, browsing different types of SNS profiles may differentially relate to psychological well-being. In a large and ethnically diverse sample of emerging adults (N = 405), this experimental stu...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether adolescents’ social aggression is socialized through exposure to peers’ socially aggressive text messaging. Using data on the socially aggressive content of text messages that 221 participants (Mage = 15.02; 46.7% female) sent to and received from peers, and teacher-ratings of participants’ in-person social aggression, t...
Article
Full-text available
Co-construction theory suggests adolescents use digital communication to address developmental challenges. For a sample of 214 ethnically diverse adolescents, this research used direct observation to investigate the frequency, content, and timing of texting with parents, peers, and romantic partners through grades 9-12. Analyses showed that texting...
Article
Across two studies, the current research investigated how different dimensions of narcissism (grandiosity/agentic extraversion, entitlement/self-centered antagonism, vulnerability/narcissistic neuroticism) relate to social networking site (SNS) use and behaviors. Study 1 employed a community sample of young adults, whereas Study 2 examined college...
Article
Substance use increases during emerging adulthood and may relate to higher concurrent and future problems. For a community sample of 140 emerging adults, this study explores the associations between reported alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco use in 12th grade, the content of public posts and private messaging on Facebook during the fall after 12th gr...
Article
Full-text available
Passively browsing social networking sites (SNSs) correlates with poorer well-being (Verduyn, Ybarra, Résibois, Jonides, & Kross, 2017). However, less research has been conducted that fully examines what factors may mediate this association. In particular, both online social comparison and the fear of missing out (FoMO) may play roles in how passiv...
Article
Full-text available
Research in life span development suggests that middle adulthood is a time of stability, discovery, and psychosocial growth. This review applies the life span developmental perspective to advance counselors’ understanding of psychosocial development during middle adulthood, specifically, midlife adults’ sense of self, perceptions of aging, developm...
Presentation
Peers socialize adolescents’ social aggression in face-to-face interactions (Ellis & Zarbatany, 2007; Warner & Hill, 2010); however, such influence now likely transcends in-person interactions due to the increased popularity of text messaging. Thus, research on peer socialization of social aggression in these environments is needed. This study exam...
Article
Full-text available
The present study explored social and psychological predictors of social networking site (SNS) and mobile phone dependency in a sample of emerging adults (ages 18-25, n = 159, M = 21.87, SD = 2.08) and young adults (ages 26-40, n = 97, M = 31.21, SD = 4.11). Path analysis revealed that SNS dependency mediated the relationship of social comparison,...

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