Justine Philip

Justine Philip
Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung Cultural Heritage Aboriginal Corporation · Yiagilang Ngarrngatj Seeking Knowledge, Research Unit.

PhD Ecosystem Management

About

11
Publications
1,499
Reads
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22
Citations
Introduction
Justine Philip is a writer/researcher currently based in Pont Melvez, France. Justine's research focuses on environmental history and human-animal studies in Australia and New Zealand, providing a dialogue between Indigenous ecological knowledge systems, colonial history and western science.
Additional affiliations
November 2014 - December 2014
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Short-term Research Associate
Description
  • Short-term Research Associate of the Institutional History Division of Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington DC
November 2014 - November 2014
Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Washington DC
Position
  • Seminar presentation
Description
  • "The Australian Dingo; a curious history of culture and conflict." Zoology series seminar, 5th November 2014
November 2014 - November 2014
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Seminar presentation
Description
  • "The Australian Dingo; a curious history of culture and conflict." Zoology series seminar, 5th November 2014 National Museum of Natural History, Washington DC
Education
January 2013 - February 2016
University of New England (Australia)
Field of study
  • Ecosystem Management
February 2010 - January 2013
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Human-animal studies
February 2006 - June 2009
RMIT University
Field of study
  • Scientific Photography

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
The Dog Fence: what future for this iconic but contentious barrier? Carving a corrosive path through remote inland Australia, the Dingo Barrier Fence has cast a 70-year shadow over the ecology of a significant body of the Australian continent, while also providing a critical lifeline to the nation’s iconic sheep industry.
Article
Full-text available
The longest environmental barrier in the world is Australia's 5614 km Dingo Barrier Fence. The structure was completed in the 1950s, designed to facilitate the eradication of the country's apex predator and cultural keystone species the dingo ( Canis dingo ) from sheep ( Ovis aries ) grazing areas to the south-east of the continent. The fence and i...
Article
Full-text available
For thousands of years, the water-finding abilities of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo), has assisted human survival in one of the most extreme, arid environments on earth. In addition to their contribution to Traditional Aboriginal society as a guardian, living blanket, hunting assistant and companion, the dingo’s role as intermediary between th...
Article
https://theconversation.com/air-dropping-poisoned-meat-to-kill-bush-predators-hasnt-worked-in-the-past-and-its-unlikely-to-help-now-132195
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the history of aerial baiting in Australia since the first operations commenced in 1946, initially targeting the dingo ( Canis dingo ). It was believed that dingo populations had proliferated during the Second World War, and posed a threat the re-emerging wool and meat industry. New technologies took advantage of skilled air for...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides a chronological record of the history of poison in vertebrate species control in south-east Australia, since the first instance was recorded to target dingoes in 1814. Over this time, poison was employed first as a weapon against native wildlife, and then as a curative to address Australia's increasing biodiversity crisis. The p...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster provides a chronological record of the use of poison in vertebrate pest control in South-Eastern Australia, since the first instance was recorded targetting dingoes in 1814.
Article
Full-text available
This report examines the history and significance of indigenous companion animals within traditional Aboriginal society and in early Euro-Australian settlements. Working from historical photographic and anthropological records, the project constructs a visual and written record of these often-transient human-animal relationships, including cockatoo...
Poster
Full-text available
An observational research project looking at the distinguishing features and behaviours of the dingo in captivity and in their native environment.

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