Justin M J Travis

Justin M J Travis
University of Aberdeen | ABDN · Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences

PhD in Ecology from Imperial College London

About

219
Publications
50,777
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13,196
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2006 - present
University of Aberdeen
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (219)
Article
Full-text available
Trees along linear features are important landscape features, and their loss threatens ecological connectivity. Until recently, trees outside of woodlands (TOWs) were largely unmapped however; the development of innovation mapping techniques provides opportunities to understand the distribution of such trees and to apply spatially explicit models t...
Article
Full-text available
There has been rapid increase of interest in the role that information acquisition plays in ecological process and in shaping life histories and their evolution. Compared to auditory and olfactory cues, the range at which visual cues are likely to be informative to animals is particularly sensitive to the spatial structure of the environment. Howev...
Article
New biological models are incorporating the realistic processes underlying biological responses to climate change and other human-caused disturbances. However, these more realistic models require detailed information, which is lacking for most species on Earth. Current monitoring efforts mainly document changes in biodiversity, rather than collecti...
Article
Rapid environmental changes are threatening biodiversity and exposing species to novel ecological and evolutionary pressures. The scientific community increasingly recognises the need for dynamic models integrating sufficient complexity both to improve our understanding of species’ responses to environmental changes and to inform effective manageme...
Article
Full-text available
Estimating population spread rates across multiple species is vital for projecting biodiversity responses to climate change. A major challenge is to parameterise spread models for many species. We introduce an approach that addresses this challenge, coupling a trait-based analysis with spatial population modelling to project spread rates for 15 000...
Article
Full-text available
Trees outside woodlands facilitate dispersal of woodland invertebrates and may buffer against fragmentation impacts. European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is common outside woodlands but is threatened by the fungal disease ash dieback (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus). Loss of ash trees to disease or pre-emptive felling could represent a substantial loss in co...
Article
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Aim: In the most widely used family of methods for ancestral range estimation (ARE), dispersal, speciation and extirpation events are estimated from information on ex-tant lineages. However, this approach fails to consider the geographic distribution of extinct species and their position on the phylogenetic tree, an omission that could compromise r...
Chapter
The relative contribution of speciation and extinction into current diversity is certainly unknown, but mathematical frameworks that use genetic information have been developed to provide estimates of these processes. To that end, it is necessary to reconstruct molecular phylogenetic trees which summarize ancestor-descendant relationships as well a...
Article
Full-text available
Context Linear landscape elements (LLEs) such as ditches and hedgerows can increase the ecological connectivity of habitat embedded within agricultural areas by acting as corridors for animal movement. However, we lack knowledge on how the spatial arrangement of LLEs influence dispersal, impeding our ability to offer robust advice on how best to ad...
Article
Full-text available
demonstrated that individuals growing in shrublands have a higher fecundity than those in grassland and rocky habitats. Furthermore, grazing pressure of cattle and horses substantially reduces fecundity and impacts the relationship between age and fecundity. We incorporated our field-estimated habitat and age-specific fecundities into both analytic...
Article
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Among‐individual and within‐individual variation in expression of seasonal migration versus residence is widespread in nature and could substantially affect the dynamics of partially‐migratory metapopulations inhabiting seasonally‐ and spatially‐structured environments. However, such variation has rarely been explicitly incorporated into metapopula...
Article
Full-text available
Models are useful tools for understanding and predicting ecological patterns and processes. Under ongoing climate and biodiversity change, they can greatly facilitate decision-making in conservation and restoration and help designing adequate management strategies for an uncertain future. Here, we review the use of spatially explicit models for dec...
Article
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Defining appropriate null expectations for species distribution hypotheses is important because sampling bias and spatial autocorrelation can produce realistic, but ecologically meaningless, geographic patterns. Generating null species occurrences with similar spatial structure to observed data can help overcome these problems, but existing methods...
Article
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Rapid progress is being made in understanding how dispersal strategies influence the spread of species whose ranges are expanding. However, potentially vital dispersal behaviours have so far been neglected. Social species have been demonstrated to use their own breeding performance (personal information) and the breeding performance of their conspe...
Article
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Aim The relationships between species and their landscape are important for understanding migration patterns. In fluvial systems, the complexity of the river network can strongly influence the dispersal and colonization rates of invading alien fishes, but habitat quality, species’ biological traits and their location of introduction are also potent...
Article
Time is running out to limit further devastating losses of biodiversity and nature's contributions to humans. Addressing this crisis requires accurate predictions about which species and ecosystems are most at risk to ensure efficient use of limited conservation and management resources. We review existing biodiversity projection models and discove...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of individuals to leave a current breeding area and select a future one is important, because such decisions can have multiple consequences for individual fitness, but also for metapopulation dynamics, structure, and long-term persistence through non-random dispersal patterns. In the wild, many colonial and territorial animal species di...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is increasing evidence that life-history traits can evolve rapidly during range expansion and that this evolution can impact the ecological dynamics of population spread. While dispersal evolution during range expansion has received substantial attention, dormancy (dispersal in time) has not. Here, we use an individual-based model to investig...
Article
Full-text available
Models are useful tools for understanding and predicting ecological patterns and processes. Under ongoing climate and biodiversity change, they can greatly facilitate decision-making in conservation and restoration and help designing adequate management strategies for an uncertain future. Here, we review the use of spatially explicit models for dec...
Article
Full-text available
Context Agricultural expansion is a leading cause of deforestation and habitat fragmentation globally. Policies that support biodiversity and facilitate species movement across farmland are therefore central to sustainability efforts and wildlife conservation in these human-modified landscapes. Objectives We investigated the conservation impact of...
Article
Full-text available
Reliably modelling the demographic and distributional responses of a species to environmental changes can be crucial for successful conservation and management planning. Process-based models have the potential to achieve this goal, but so far they remain underused for predictions of species' distributions. Individual-based models offer the addition...
Article
Full-text available
Process-based models are becoming increasingly used tools for understanding how species are likely to respond to environmental changes and to potential management options. RangeShifter is one such modelling platform, which has been used to address a range of questions including identifying effective reintroduction strategies, understanding patterns...
Preprint
Full-text available
ContextLinear landscape elements (LLEs) such as ditches and hedgerows can increase the ecological connectivity of habitat embedded within agricultural areas by acting as corridors for animal movement. However, we lack knowledge on how the spatial arrangement of LLEs influence dispersal, impeding our ability to offer robust advice on how best to add...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biological invasions represent one of the main anthropogenic drivers of global change with a substantial impact on biodiversity. This impact can be particularly acute in biodiversity hotspots. Ligustrum lucidum W.T. Aiton is a tree species native of China that, from as early as the eighteenth century, has been introduced broadly around the glob...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of biological invasions on native biodiversity have resulted in a range of policy and management initiatives to minimise their impacts. Although management options for invasive species include eradication and population control, empirical knowledge is limited on how different management strategies affect invasion outcomes. An individual...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Landmasses have been continuously modified by tectonic activity, the breakup and collision of landmasses is thought to have generated or suppressed ecological opportunities, altering the rates of speciation, dispersal and extinction. However, the extent to which the signatures of past geological events are retained in modern biodiversity patter...
Preprint
Defining appropriate null expectations for species distribution hypotheses is important because sampling bias and spatial autocorrelation can produce realistic, but ecologically meaningless, geographic patterns. Generating null species occurrences with similar spatial structure to observed data can help overcome these problems, but existing methods...
Article
Full-text available
Reliably modelling the demographic and distributional responses of a species to environmental changes can be crucial for successful conservation and management planning. Process-based models have the potential to achieve this goal, but so far they remain underused for predictions of species' distributions. Individual-based models offer the addition...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many marine species use different habitats at different stages of their life cycle. Functional connectivity, the degree to which the seascape facilitates or impedes movement between habitat patches, is poorly studied in marine systems. We reviewed the scientific literature to explore the various barriers preventing functional connectivity between m...
Article
Full-text available
Animal spatial behaviour is often presumed to reflect responses to visual cues. However, inference of behaviour in relation to the environment is challenged by the lack of objective methods to identify the information that effectively is available to an animal from a given location. In general, animals are assumed to have unconstrained information...
Article
The interacting impacts of habitat fragmentation and climate change present a substantial threat for biodiversity, constituting a 'deadly anthropogenic cocktail'. A range of conservation actions has been proposed to allow biodiversity to respond to those environmental changes. However, determining the relative effectiveness of these actions has bee...
Preprint
Full-text available
Process-based models are becoming increasingly used tools for understanding how species are likely to respond to environmental changes and to potential management options. RangeShifter is one such modelling platform, which has been used to address a range of questions including identifying effective reintroduction strategies, understanding patterns...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Reliably modelling the demographic and distributional responses of a species to environmental changes can be crucial for successful conservation and management planning. Process-based models have the potential to achieve this goal, but so far they remain underused for predictions of species′ distributions. Individual-based models offer the addit...
Article
Full-text available
Substantial literature is devoted to understanding dispersal evolution, but we lack theory on how dispersal evolves when populations inhabit currents. Such theory is required for understanding connectivity in freshwater and marine environments; moreover, many animals, fungi and plants rely on wind‐based dispersal, but the effects of currents on dis...
Article
Empirical studies have documented both positive and negative density‐dependent dispersal, yet most theoretical models predict positive density dependence as a mechanism to avoid competition. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of negative density‐dependent dispersal, but few of these have been formally modeled. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive Alien Species (IAS) threaten biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services, modify landscapes and impose costs to national economies. Management efforts are underway globally to reduce these impacts, but little attention has been paid to optimising the use of the scarce available resources when IAS are impossible to eradicate, and therefo...
Article
Full-text available
Short-distance dispersal enables introduced alien species to colonise and invade local habitats following their initial introduction, but is often poorly understood for many freshwater taxa. Knowledge gaps in range expansion of alien species can be overcome using predictive approaches such as individual based models (IBMs), especially if prediction...
Article
With the expansion of urban areas, promoting urban biodiversity is now a priority. Many municipalities are implementing greening strategies to improve and increase green space within city boundaries. The effectiveness of these strategies, while rarely assessed, likely depends on the landscape and on relevant species intrinsic traits such as dispers...
Preprint
Full-text available
In a context of global change, scientists and policy-makers require tools to address the issue of biodiversity loss. Population viability analysis (PVA) has been the main tool to deal with this problem. However, the tools developed during the 90s poorly integrate recent scientific advances in landscape genetics and dispersal. We developed a flexibl...
Article
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Dispersal of prey from predator-free patches frequently supplies a trophic subsidy to predators by providing more prey than are produced locally. Prey arriving from predator-free patches might also have evolved weaker defenses against predators and thus enhance trophic subsidies by providing easily captured prey. Using local models assuming a linea...
Research
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Globally, large carnivores have been heavily affected by habitat loss, fragmentation and persecution, sometimes resulting in local extinctions. With increasing recognition of top-down trophic cascades and complex predator-prey dynamics, reintroductions are of growing interest for restoration of ecosystem functioning. Many reintroductions have howev...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the dynamics of socio‐ecological systems is crucial to the development of environmentally sustainable practices. Models of social or ecological sub‐systems have greatly enhanced such understanding, but at the risk of obscuring important feedbacks and emergent effects. Integrated modelling approaches have the potential to address this...
Article
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Many species are undergoing distributional changes in response to climate change. However, wide variability in range shifting rates has been observed across taxa, and even among closely‐related species. Attempts to link climate‐mediated range shifts to traits has often produced weak or conflicting results. Here we investigate interactive effects of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: The fifth report of Cuba for the Convention on Biological Diversity states that enhancing the connectivity of the terrestrial Cuban system of protected areas is a high priority task. However, no national-scale assessment has been made to evaluate how effective this system is. This work aims to (1) determine whether and the degree to which exte...
Article
1.Planning for nature conservation has increasingly emphasised the concepts of resilience and spatial networks. Although the importance of habitat networks for individual species is clear, their significance for long‐term ecological resilience and multi‐species conservation strategies is less established. 2.Referencing spatial network theory, we de...
Article
Full-text available
Increasingly imperative objectives in ecology are to understand and forecast population dynamic and evolutionary responses to seasonal environmental variation and change. Such population and evolutionary dynamics result from immediate and lagged responses of all key life‐history traits, and resulting demographic rates that affect population growth...
Data
Appendix S1. Methods. Table S1. Examples of heritability (h 2) estimates in the reviewed studies. Table S2. Models of dispersal evolution and assumptions made on the genetic architecture of the evolving traits.
Presentation
The ability of individuals to select a future breeding area is particularly influential during their lifetime, because such decisions can have multiple consequences on individual life history traits and fitness, but also population dynamics, structure and long-term persistence through non-random dispersal patterns. In the wild, many colonial or ter...
Article
Full-text available
Individual-based models (IBMs) incorporating realistic representations of key range-front processes such as dispersal can be used as tools to investigate the dynamics of invasive species. Managers can apply insights from these models to take effective action to prevent further spread and prioritize measures preventing establishment of invasive spec...
Article
Full-text available
Detailed information acquired using tracking technology has the potential to provide accurate pictures of the types of movements and behaviors performed by animals. To date, such data have not been widely exploited to provide inferred information about the foraging habitat. We collected data using multiple sensors (GPS, time depth recorders, and ac...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) revie...
Article
Dispersal and migration are superficially similar large-scale movements, but which appear to differ in terms of inter-individual behavioural synchronization. Seasonal migration is a striking example of coordinated behaviour, enabling animal populations to track spatio-temporal variation in ecological conditions. By contrast, for dispersal, while so...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely recognized that ecological dynamics influence evolutionary dynamics, and conversely that evolutionary changes alter ecological processes. Because fragmentation impacts all biological levels (from individuals to ecosystems) through isolation and reduced habitat size, it strongly affects the links among evolutionary and ecological proces...
Article
Habitat fragmentation, an important element of current global change, has profound repercussions on population and species extinction. Landscape fragmentation reduces individual movements between patches (i.e. dispersal) while such movements connecting patches enhance the persistence of metapopulations and metacommunities. Through the recognition o...
Article
Full-text available
Landscape ecological modelling provides a vital means for understanding the interactions between geographical, climatic, and socio-economic drivers of land-use and the dynamics of ecological systems. This growing field is playing an increasing role in informing landscape spatial planning and management. Here, we review the key modelling approaches...