Justin M Power

Justin M Power
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Linguistics

PhD

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12
Publications
1,584
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15
Citations

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
In contrast to scholars and signers in the nineteenth century, William Stokoe conceived of American Sign Language (ASL) as a unique linguistic tradition with roots in nineteenth-century langue des signes française, a conception that is apparent in his earliest scholarship on ASL. Stokoe thus contributed to the theoretical foundations upon which the...
Poster
Young children are thought to play a unique role in the emergence and evolution of language. In research on language acquisition by a deaf child of late learners of ASL as well as in research on the emergence of new signed languages, young children have shown the ability to impose systematicity on relatively less systematic linguistic input (Single...
Poster
Full-text available
In discussions of the history of American Sign Language (ASL), a village sign language—Martha’s Vineyard Sign Language (MVSL)—has been identified as a possible contributor to ASL and to its differentiation from French Sign Language (LSF; cf. Groce 1985: 73-74, Lane et al 2011: 76, Poole Nash 2015: 611). On this account, MVSL contributed to ASL thro...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of spoken languages has been studied since the mid-nineteenth century using traditional historical comparative methods and, more recently, computational phylogenetic methods. By contrast, evolutionary processes resulting in the diversity of contemporary sign languages (SLs) have received much less attention, and scholars have been lar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
I present data from a signed language in Tajikistan, which emerged beginning around 1940 primarily in the Leninsky residential school for the deaf, when hearing Russian educators began teaching L2 varieties of Russian Sign Language to children.
Poster
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This research is both a methodological exploration applying the comparative method in historical linguistics to putatively-related signed languages; and a theoretical inquiry into whether there is a parallel to regular sound change in signed language change.
Article
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In this blog post for The Genealogical World of Phylogenetic Networks, I take up the topic of handshape evolution, explaining some of the complexities involved in studying sign language evolution and looking specifically at how we can identify vertical and horizontal processes in the evolution of handshapes.
Preprint
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While the evolution of spoken languages is well understood and has been studied using traditional historical comparative methods as well as newer computational phylogenetic methods, evolutionary processes resulting in the diversity of contemporary sign languages are poorly understood, and scholars have been largely unsuccessful in grouping sign lan...
Presentation
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To date, no historical study of signed languages has successfully applied the comparative method to identify the types of regular correspondences that conclusively establish cognate vocabulary. I explore theoretical and methodological reasons for the failure of the primary method in historical linguistics when applied to signed languages. I argue t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper explores the historical relationships of Tajik Sign Language and Afghan Sign Language. I conduct a phylogenetic network analysis of basic vocabulary from four Tajik Sign Language signers and Afghan Sign Language, as well as two foreign sign languages with which deaf Tajiks and Afghans have had contact, namely, Russian Sign Language in Ta...
Poster
Full-text available
In this poster based on my MA thesis, I present evidence of contrast in the handshape parameter in Afghan Sign Language.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Using data from Afghan Sign Language, this paper examines the roles of iconicity and arbitrariness in new sign formation through initialization.

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