Justin Maire

Justin Maire
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

About

20
Publications
4,540
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176
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
176 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080

Publications

Publications (20)
Preprint
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Corals are associated with a variety of bacteria, which occur in the surface mucus layer, gastrovascular cavity, skeleton, and tissues. Some tissue-associated bacteria form clusters, termed cell-associated microbial aggregates (CAMAs), which are poorly studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive characterization of CAMAs in the coral Pocillopora acut...
Article
Full-text available
To survive in nutrient-poor waters corals rely on a symbiotic association with intracellular microalgae. However, increased sea temperatures cause algal loss—known as coral bleaching—often followed by coral death. Some of the most compelling evidence in support of the ‘oxidative stress theory of coral bleaching’ comes from studies that exposed cora...
Article
Full-text available
Heat-tolerant strains of the coral endosymbiont, Cladocopium C1 acro (Symbiodiniaceae), have previously been developed via experimental evolution. Here, we examine physiological responses and bacterial community composition (using 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding) in cultures of 10 heat-evolved (SS) and 9 wild-type (WT) strains, which had been exposed f...
Article
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The climate crisis is one of the most significant threats to marine ecosystems. It is leading to severe increases in sea surface temperatures and in the frequency and magnitude of marine heatwaves. These changing conditions are directly impacting coral reef ecosystems, which are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth. Coral-associated symbio...
Article
Full-text available
Background The rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae is one of the most important agricultural pests, causing extensive damage to cereal in fields and to stored grains. S. oryzae has an intracellular symbiotic relationship (endosymbiosis) with the Gram-negative bacterium Sodalis pierantonius and is a valuable model to decipher host-symbiont molecular inter...
Preprint
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Ceratitis capitata (medfly), is one of the most injurious pests of fruits with quarantine importance because of its extremely wide host range. The use of entomopathogenic fungi constitutes a promising approach for potential applications in integrated pest management. Nonetheless, developing methods of insect control can also involve the use of fung...
Article
Full-text available
Corals are the main primary producers of coral reefs and build the three-dimensional reef structure that provides habitat to more than 25% of all marine eukaryotes. They harbor a complex consortium of microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, fungi, viruses, and protists, which they rely on for their survival. The symbiosis between corals and ba...
Article
Coral reefs are rapidly declining because of widespread mass coral bleaching causing extensive coral mortality. Elevated seawater temperatures are the main drivers of coral bleaching, and climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of destructive marine heatwaves. Efforts to enhance coral thermal bleaching tolerance can be targeted at t...
Article
Full-text available
Background Coral reefs are among the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. This success relies on the coral’s association with a wide range of microorganisms, including dinoflagellates of the family Symbiodiniaceae that provide coral hosts with most of their organic carbon requirements. While bacterial associates have long been overlooke...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Among beetles, the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae is one of the most important pests causing extensive damage to cereal in fields and to stored grains. S. oryzae has an intracellular symbiotic relationship (endosymbiosis) with the Gram-negative bacterium Sodalis pierantonius and is a valuable model to decipher host-symbiont molecular inte...
Article
Full-text available
Corals house a variety of microorganisms which they depend on for their survival, including endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodiniaceae) and bacteria. While cnidarian–microorganism interactions are widely studied, Symbiodiniaceae–bacteria interactions are only just beginning to receive attention. Here, we describe the localization and compositio...
Article
Full-text available
Virtually all animals associate with beneficial symbiotic bacteria. Whether and how these associations are modulated across a host’s lifecycle is an important question in disentangling animal-bacteria interactions. We recently reported a case of complete morphological reorganization of symbiosis during metamorphosis of the cereal weevil, Sitophilus...
Article
Significance Virtually all animals are associated with symbiotic bacteria. How these associations are modulated across an animal’s life cycle is a key question in understanding animal–bacteria interactions, particularly in organisms that undergo metamorphosis during development. Here, we used the cereal weevil to show how symbiosis is reorganized d...
Article
Long-term intracellular symbiosis (or endosymbiosis) is widely distributed across invertebrates and is recognized as a major driving force in evolution. However, the maintenance of immune homeostasis in organisms chronically infected with mutualistic bacteria is a challenging task, and little is known about the molecular processes that limit endosy...
Article
Full-text available
Many insects developing on nutritionally unbalanced diets have evolved symbiotic associations with vertically transmitted intracellular bacteria (endosymbionts) that provide them with metabolic components, thereby improving the host’s abilities to thrive on such poor ecological niches. While host-endosymbiont coevolutionary constraints are known to...
Article
Many insects maintain intracellular symbiosis with mutualistic bacteria that improve their adaptive capabilities in nutritionally poor habitats. Adaptation of insect immune systems to such associations has been shown in several symbiotic consortia, including that of the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae with the gammaproteobacterium Sodalis pierantoniu...

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