Justin E Anderson

Justin E Anderson
BASF | BASF · Vegetable Seeds

PhD

About

39
Publications
13,367
Reads
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973
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
839 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Introduction
Justin is Senior Scientist in Breeding Statistics at BASF Vegetable Seeds. His areas of scientific interest include: • Data Science in Plant Breeding • Genetic Diversity and Breeding Applications • Genetic Architecture of Rapid Adaptation • Genome Evolution
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
BASF Vegetable Seeds
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2016 - December 2017
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I explore local adaptation and population genetics in Arabidopsis halleri.
April 2016 - August 2016
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • I worked in data analysis and manuscript improvement.
Education
June 2011 - December 2015
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Plant Breeding and Molecular Genetics
September 2007 - January 2011
Gustavus Adolphus College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
Heavy metal‐rich toxic soils and ordinary soils are both natural habitats of Arabidopsis halleri, a diploid perennial and obligate outcrosser in the sister clade of the genetic model plant A. thaliana. The molecular divergence underlying survival in sharply contrasting environments is unknown. Here we comparatively address metal physiology and tran...
Article
Full-text available
Resolving the origin of endangered taxa is an essential component of conservation. This information can be used to guide efforts of bolstering genetic diversity, and also enables species recovery and future evolutionary studies. Here, we used low-coverage whole genome sequencing to clarify the origin of Helianthus schweinitzii, an endangered tetrap...
Preprint
Full-text available
Heavy metal-rich toxic soils and ordinary soils are both natural habitats of Arabidopsis halleri . The molecular divergence underlying survival in sharply contrasting environments is unknown. Here we comparatively address metal physiology and transcriptomes of A . halleri originating from the most highly heavy metal-contaminated soil in Europe, Pon...
Chapter
Root and tuber crops are staples in diets across the world. They are favored due to a large yield associated with the small acreage needed to grow. Generally, they tend to be fairly robust to insect and disease pests and have historically been used as starvation food. Some root and tuber crops, such as potato, sweet potato, or cassava, are the prim...
Article
Full-text available
Soybean (Glycine max) is the most widely grown oilseed in the world and is an important source of protein for both humans and livestock. Soybean is widely adapted to both temperate and tropical regions, but a changing climate demands a better understanding of adaptation to specific environmental conditions. Here, we explore genetic variation in a c...
Article
This article attempts to summarize the current knowledge on plant domestication on the basis of recent genome sequencing. To this end, several topics are explored, including (a) domestication as a process, (b) the genetics of domestication, (c) the impact of domestication on plant genomes, and (d) how domestication studies may change in the future...
Chapter
Genomic structural variation is an important component to genetic diversity in soybean (Glycine max). These large-scale genomic differences are now known as the underlying genetic mechanisms for a number of important phenotypic traits. Identifying structural variants across numerous individuals at higher resolution is increasingly possible with a n...
Article
Full-text available
Wild species related to agricultural crops (crop wild relatives, or CWR) can increase the adaptive capacity of agricultural systems around the world. They represent a large pool of genetic diversity from which to draw new allelic variation required in breeding programs. Crop wild relatives have been extremely valuable in adapting crop varieties to...
Article
Full-text available
Chile peppers, native to the Americas, have spread around the world and have been integrated into the diets of many cultures. Much like their heat content, nutritional content can vary dramatically between different pepper types. In this study, a diverse set of chile pepper types were examined for nutrient content. Some pepper types were found to h...
Data
Boxplots of levels of capsaicin (SHU), vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate detected in pepper types based on continent of origin, cultivar or landrace, or species. The top plot of capsaicin content is on a log base 10 scale. (TIFF)
Data
Color and shape data for peppers pictured in Fig 1 estimated with Tomato Analyzer 3.0. (XLSX)
Data
Crossing relationships of Capsicum cultivated species relative to each other and wild species. (XLSX)
Data
Pearson (upper right) and Spearman (lower left) correlations between chile pepper nutritional compounds, shape, and color components. Bold text indicates significant relationship (p<0.05); stronger red = more linear positive relationship; stronger blue = more linear negative relationship. (XLSX)
Data
Seed Source for all pepper varieties used in this study. (XLSX)
Data
A) Overlap of genotypes with the highest vitamin content and high capsaicin content. B) Overlap of genotypes with high vitamin content and low capsaicin content. The overlap between high SHU and vitamin C were the cultivars Bhut Jolokia, Trinidad Moruga Scorpion, Trinidad Butch T Scorpion, and Trinidad 7 Pot. The overlap between vitamin A and vitam...
Data
Raw values for nutritional compounds and capsaicin content. Evaluated by least significant difference for grouping, group critical values listed. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Background: The safety of mutagenized and genetically transformed plants remains a subject of scrutiny. Data gathered and communicated on the phenotypic and molecular variation induced by gene transfer technologies will provide a scientific-based means to rationally address such concerns. In this study, genomic structural variation (e.g. large del...
Article
Full-text available
Natural populations across a species range demonstrate population structure owing to neutral processes such as localized origins of mutations and migration limitations. Selection also acts on a subset of loci, contributing to local adaptation. An understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation to local environmental conditions is a fundamental goa...
Article
Full-text available
Fast neutron radiation has been used as a mutagen to develop extensive mutant collections. However, the genome-wide structural consequences of fast neutron radiation are not well understood. Here, we examine the genome-wide structural variants observed among 264 soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) plants sampled from a large fast neutron-mutagenized...
Article
Full-text available
Gene structural variation (SV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important phenotypic traits in crop species. We screened a panel of 41 soybean (Glycine max) accessions serving as parents in a soybean nested association mapping population for deletions and duplications in over 53,000 gene models. Array hybridization...
Conference Paper
Gene copy number variation (CNV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important QTL in crop species. We screened over 52,000 gene models in soybean for deletions and duplications among the 41 parental accessions that are being used to develop the soybean Nested Association Mapping population. Array hybridization and wh...
Article
Assessment of gene function oftentimes requires mutant populations that can be screened by forward or reverse genetic analysis. The situation becomes more complicated in polyploidy or paleopolyploid genomes that have two or more copies for most genes. Here we describe a method for engineering zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) for the purpose of creating...
Conference Paper
Genomic studies in crop plants are shifting from an era of random mutations to directed genomic modifications. This process has been driven by the development of genome engineering technologies, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and meganucleases (MN). Here we describe a method for eng...
Article
Full-text available
Genome-wide structural and gene content variations are hypothesized to drive important phenotypic variation within a species. Structural and gene content variations were assessed among four soybean (Glycine max) genotypes using array hybridization and targeted resequencing. Many chromosomes exhibited relatively low rates of structural variation (SV...

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