Julius Hassemer

Julius Hassemer
Dr Julius Hassemer

Dr.

About

26
Publications
5,960
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69
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
62 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
Introduction
My research focus is on 'gesture form' and on empirical studies with video and 3D motion-capture data. All data are made available or linked to on this page. I received my PhD at the RWTH Aachen University (Germany).

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
This dissertation presents the theory and application of Gesture Form Analysis, which systematises necessary processes of spatial conceptualisation for understanding a specific gesture type (pointing, drawing, representing etc.). Eight gesture form operations are proposed, which are combined in a modular fashion. They are applied in the analysis of...
Method
Full-text available
Gesture Form Analysis coding manual, English, v.06 accompanying Hassemer & McCleary (accepted) The multidimensionality of Pointing. Gesture.
Preprint
Full-text available
accompanying (graphical summary of) Hassemer & McCleary (accepted.). The multidimensionality of pointing. Gesture. based on Gesture Form Analysis
Method
Full-text available
36 gesture types of an all-hand-gestures taxonomy as a supplement to Hassemer, J., & McCleary, L. (in press). The multidimensionality of pointing. Gesture. (in which we focus on pointing gestures) This taxonomy tree is intended as a companion for coding gestures following gesture form analysis. All types of this taxonomy are consistent with the...
Preprint
Full-text available
The analysis of pointing gestures presented here assumes that the meaning of a gesture is enabled by a series of cognitive operations leading from the physical form of an acting articulator, through a limited number of abstract topological conceptualisations, to its referent. Seven proposed operations can be combined in unique permutations of two t...
Preprint
Full-text available
The contemporary interdisciplinary domain of gesture studies is heavily rooted in the cognitive linguistics enterprise (Evans, Bergen & Zinken, 2007), especially concerning its “cognitive commitment” (Lakoff, 1990: 40), aligning gesture research within research on cognition. There is a growing body of literature highlighting that gesture may very w...
Article
Full-text available
This paper proposes a novel analysis of deictic gestures which yields a taxonomy of manual pointing. ‘Gesture form analysis’ brings into relief the diversity of pointing by considering the imaginary forms necessarily involved in interpreting a gesture. It combines into a single framework insights found in the literature on how the meaning of any ge...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers frequently perform representational gestures to depict concepts in an iconic fashion. For example, a speaker may hold her index finger and thumb apart to indicate the size of a matchstick. However, the process by which a physical handshape is mentally transformed into abstract spatial information is not well understood. We present a series...
Research
Full-text available
Curriculum vitae
Method
Full-text available
accompanying Hassemer & McCleary (subm.) The multidimensionality of pointing. Gesture
Data
Datalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11022/1009-0000-0007-C34C-8 . Corpus including, video cameras, highspeed cameras, motion capture cameras (Vicon). Coding resources including: Elan template files, Manuals in English and Portuguese, data analysis and scripts. Lab: Natural Media and Engineering (Irene Mittelberg), RWTH Aachen
Article
In "Two heads are better than one," "head" stands for people and focuses the message on the intelligence of people. This is an example of figurative language through metonymy, where substituting a whole entity by one of its parts focuses attention on a specific aspect of the entity. Whereas metaphors, another figurative language device, are substit...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In most typologies of gesture (see McNeill, 1992, p. 76, for a summary), iconic gestures and deictic (pointing) gestures are treated as separate kinds of gesture. This does not seem to be correct. Pointing gestures can trace the shape of what is being pointed at, and thus superimpose an iconic display on a deictic point within the performance of a...
Presentation
Full-text available
Demonstration of how gesture research can be used to develope more natural and intuitive gesture controls in the future, autonomous, car. The two gestures help finding information about buildings that are Pointed At in the visible surrounding and choosing a route by a Directing gesture.
Method
Full-text available
Gesture Form Analysis coding manual, Portuguese, v.06 accompanying Hassemer & McCleary (subm.) The multidimensionality of Pointing. Gesture.
Research
Full-text available
Hassemer, J., & Engel, L. (2016). Wannabe Jedis (Jedi sein wollen). Stylepark Magazine. Frankfurt (Main).
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we analyze single-handed hold gestures that convey the height or the shape of an object ('height gestures' and 'shape gestures'). The analyses include (1) differentiating which parts of the hands are profiled in each gesture, (2) considering whether these parts are occluded by other fingers, and (3) deriving predictions from (1) and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper builds on a strand of gesture research that regards form as the basis of any meaningful interpretation of gesture. Gesture form is considered to be derived from body part (ar-ticulator) configurations and movement. We propose that gesture form is multi-layered and can be described economically by form primitives (zero to three dimensions...
Data
Lab: Natural Media and Engineering (Irene Mittelberg), RWTH Aachen
Article
This paper rests upon the simple assumption that people move in various ways when speaking and that some of these movements are intended and meaningful - they are gestures. As the hands’ possibility to perform gesture is widely accepted and comparably well represented in the literature, other articulators will be focused upon in this study. In a co...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Offer a systematic classification and coding system on the basis of form and function in gesture
Project
Gesture studies, a young but dynamic interdisciplinary area of research of interest to psychology, anthropology, linguistics and informatics, has not yet settled on a common typology of gestures, nor even on the principles on which such a typology might be constructed. It is agreed that co-verbal gestures convey meaning through the physical form and movement of the hand, often by means of iconically representing aspects of objects or imitating practical actions (e.g., Calbris 2003; Cienki 2005; Efron 1941; Kendon 2004; Kita et al. 2007; Mittelberg 2010; Müller 2008; Streeck 2009). But existing categorisations fundamentally disagree on the number of types and on their relations to one another. The number of gesture type categories ranges from 4 (Müller 1998) to 12 (Streeck 2008) to 84 (Sowa 2006), often making cross-studies comparison difficult. The theory of Gesture Form Analysis (GFA), proposes a systematic, form-based categorisation framework, combining insights from the above-mentioned scholars. Basic assumptions of GFA have already been empirically supported in a motion-capture study (Hassemer, dissertation). Still lacking, however, are (1) application of GFA to the gestural elements of sign language and (2) standardisation of a practical coding procedure that allows quantifying gesture data by type across different corpora. These are the two primary foci of this proposal. A third, exploratory goal is to begin testing the viability of GFA as a model for automatic gesture recognition. In support of these goals, we propose to continue the study at the University of São Paulo, with Prof. Leland McCleary, a linguist who is familiar with GFA and who, with his colleague Evani Viotti, has been studying gestural elements of Brazilian Sign Language as well as methods of sign transcription; and whose colleague Felipe Barbosa does research on phonetic variation in sign language, using VICON motion-capture technology. The proposed situation will also permit the initial investigation of GFA applications to machine-learning methods together with a specialist in that area, Sarajane Peres. All of these researchers at the University of São Paulo have agreed to collaborate. Specifically in support of the second goal of implementation of a practical coding method, we bring to the project prior experience of having successfully collaborated (with Han Sloetjes, MPI Nijmegen) on the creation of a gesture annotation plugin for the ELAN transcription software. In support of the second and third goal, we also bring a motion-capture corpus, collected during the dissertation, containing multiple-camera (high-speed) video recordings and three-dimensional motion-capture data on verbal-gestural descriptions that can be used as a show-case corpus for quantitative GFA and for the exploratory machine-learning investigation.