Julija Sardelic

Julija Sardelic
Victoria University of Wellington · School of History, Philosophy, Political Science and International Relations

PhD in Sociology

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22
Publications
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Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Some 10-15 million members of the Roma minority live in Europe; an estimated 6 million are citizens of the European Union. It was not until the 1990s that European Union institutions began treating Roma as an ethnic minority deserving of human rights protections. Concerns about mass migration of Roma from Eastern European countries where they face...
Article
Artificial intelligence (AI), which increasingly fuels Internet applications, has huge implications on the lives of ordinary people. This article examines explanations for AI decision-making as it concerns end users through the lens of humans rights.
Article
This paper examines how territorial rescaling and ensuing citizenship realignment in Europe affect marginalised minorities. It focuses on the case of Roma and calls for a new perspective on this minority: instead of viewing Roma as an exceptional non-territorial minority and migrants, it investigates their position primarily from a citizenship pers...
Chapter
Full-text available
I concur with those who claim that EU free movement should be defended on a normative as well as practical level. But it is only so much that EU freedom of movement can deliver. We cannot expect that as a standalone policy it would ‘recalibrate justice’ for marginalized minorities in the EU. Considering the position of EU Romani migrants, we can se...
Chapter
Different public debates discuss the position of Roma in Europe as if they were one of the most mobile populations in Europe. The position of mobile Romani individuals became especially visible after the 2004 and 2007 European Union (EU) Enlargements. However, only a certain type of mobility of intra EU Romani migrants became particularly highlight...
Article
This paper traces the mobilities of Romani minorities between the ‘old’ EU Member States and the non-EU Post-Yugoslav space. It unravels how the mobilities of Romani individuals, who are Non-EU Post-Yugoslav citizens, were different from the mobilities of Roma coming from other post-socialist spaces, now EU Member States. Instead of focusing on mot...
Article
This paper analyses how different EU documents (communications, recommendations, reports and surveys, etc.) focusing on Roma frame the position of Romani children. Many studies have shown that because of their intersectional positioning, Romani children often face multiple discrimination and triple exclusion: on the basis of their ethnicity, their...
Article
This article discusses the position and agency of Romani migrants. It argues that different states often irregularize the status of Romani migrants even in cases where it should be regularized due to their de jure citizenship. This irregularization is possible because of their position as semi-citizens in their ‘states of origin’. Yet, Romani migra...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the position of Romani minorities in the light of the state dissolution and further citizenship regime transformations after the disintegration of the former Socialist Yugoslavia. While observing closely the repositioning of the Romani minorities in the post-Yugoslav space, it explicates that in the case of state dissolution, t...
Article
The main objective of this paper is to map how Romani minorities were positioned in the context of post-Yugoslav citizenship regimes’ transformations and to observe possible trends throughout post-Yugoslav space regarding their positioning. The paper establishes that due to historical as well as contemporary hierarchical inclusions, many individual...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
his research addresses the question why the position of Roma in Europe keeps deteriorating despite all the (inter)national efforts put into its improvement. Roma persist as the main targets of ethnic discrimination and are faced by severe socio-economic inequalities throughout Europe. This project recognizes the urgent need to readdress the position of Roma at the times, when most of the programmes for their integration are nearing its conclusion (such as the Decade for Roma Inclusion 2005-2015) and when their intra-European mobility is being particularly problematized. By employing interdisciplinary quantitative and qualitative methodology and theoretical conceptualizations from the perspective of citizenship studies, this project aims to offer a novel insight on the position of Roma in Europe. The project investigates different dimensions of citizenship (rights, status, belonging) in order to show that Roma are not an exception or a minority that simply ‘does not fit’ and is hence excluded from society. I seek to develop a new theoretical perspective to support the above claim: I argue that there are certain institutional mechanisms, that I call as invisible edges of citizenship involved in the production of the marginalization of Romani minorities in all European states where they reside either as citizens or migrants. Instead of only offering selected case studies, this research aims to offer a cross-country comparative analysis of citizenship and minority acts as well as Roma National Strategies and the experience of Romani individuals themselves with the invisible edges of citizenship. The results of this research will be relevant both for academics as well as policy makers: I will prepare a cross-country database on approaches to minority protection and major challenges connected to the position of Roma, 2 journal articles and a book manuscript.
Project
International Organization for Migration (IOM) labelled the 2015/16 refugee crisis as the largest one in Europe after the Second World War (WWII). This research project offers a comparative socio-legal analysis of the impact of refugee crisis on the politics of diversity in the EU and non-EU states along the Western Balkan route and the European Union (EU) as a whole. I analyse the ad hoc cooperation among the states along the Western Balkan Route during the 2015/16 refugee crisis. In the short term perspective, this cooperation surpassed the EU law. I examine the changes in national legislation (asylum and international protection laws, etc.) in the countries along the Western Balkan route and how these changes facilitated an establishment of the new corridor (safe passage) for forced migrants fleeing from Middle East and Africa. I argue that by conceptualizing the Western Balkan route and the forced migration corridor in question brings us to new theoretical underpinnings of transit countries and migration as well as temporariness of migrant statuses. During the 2015/16 refugee crisis a hyper-temporariness of migrant statuses occurred (people only passing by), while transit countries (a term previously reserved only for non-EU countries) took upon themselves to transport them from one border to another. My main claim is that the new conceptualization of hyper-temporary migrant statues and transit countries in a long-term perspective has a spill-over effect on the conceptualization of politics of diversity both in the countries along the Western Balkan route as well as the European Union. It particularly affects asylum seekers and refugees from previous refugee crises (such as those during the post-Yugoslav wars), marginalized minorities (such as Roma) and vulnerable groups (migrant and minority children).