Julien Grandjean

Julien Grandjean
Université Catholique de Louvain - UCLouvain | UCLouvain · Institute of Neuroscience

PhD student

About

16
Publications
1,918
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Citations
Introduction
Julien is a third year PhD student, having previously graduated in the field of motor sciences (2015). He first joined the CoActions lab in 2013 as a research student. During his master studies, he enhanced his research skills at KU Leuven working under the supervision of Pr. Swinnen thanks to an Erasmus grant. Julien is currently working on two main projects including the development of a double-coil TMS method allowing to obtain motor-evoked potentials in both hands simultaneously (cfr. "Assessing the reliability of a double-coil TMS method to assess CSE bilaterally" project) and the investigation of preparatory inhibition in addiction (cfr Which Came First, the Chicken or the Egg? - Addiction" project).
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - October 2019
Université Catholique de Louvain - UCLouvain
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2013 - September 2015
Université Catholique de Louvain - UCLouvain
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Background: For several decades, Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to monitor corticospinal ex-citability (CSE) changes in various contexts. Habitually, single-coil TMS is applied over one primary motor cortex (M1), eliciting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in a contralateral limb muscle, usually a hand effector. However, in many...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) elicits motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) which provide a temporally precise and muscle-specific readout of the state-changes in the motor output system. For more than twenty years, many studies have used this method to investigate corticospinal excitability (CSE) chang...
Conference Paper
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) elicits motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) which provide a temporally precise and muscle-specific readout of state-changes in the motor output system. Many studies have used TMS over M1 to investigate corticospinal excitability changes occurring when choosing which hand...
Conference Paper
Many transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiments have reported the presence of motor inhibition during action preparation. Most studies have used instructed-delay choice reaction time (CRT) tasks requiring subjects to select a response based on a preparatory cue, but to withhold that response until the appearance of a GO signal. Motor-evoke...
Poster
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) elicits motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) which provide a temporally precise and muscle-specific readout of the state-changes in the motor output system. For more than twenty years, many studies have used this method to investigate corticospinal excitability (CSE) chang...
Article
Full-text available
Training can improve motor skills and modify neural activity at rest and during movement execution. Learning-related modulations may also concern motor preparation but the neural correlates and the potential behavioral relevance of such adjustments remain unclear. In humans, preparatory processes have been largely investigated using transcranial ma...
Article
Full-text available
Binge drinking consists in a pattern of consumption characterised by the repeated alternation between massive alcohol intakes and abstinence periods. A continuum hypothesis suggests that this drinking endeavour represents an early stage of alcohol dependence rather than a separate phenomenon. Among the variety of alterations in alcohol-dependent in...
Article
Full-text available
A lack of inhibitory control appears to contribute to the development and maintenance of addictive disorders. Among the mechanisms thought to assist inhibitory control, an increasing focus has been drawn on the so-called preparatory suppression, which refers to the drastic suppression observed in the motor system during action preparation. Interest...
Preprint
Full-text available
Training can improve motor skills and modify neural activity at rest and during movement execution. Learning-related modulations may also concern motor preparation but the neural correlates and the potential behavioral relevance of such adjustments remain unclear. In humans, preparatory processes have been largely investigated using transcranial ma...
Article
Objectives Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) show a profound suppression when elicited during the instructed-delay of reaction time (RT) tasks. One predominant hypothesis is that this phenomenon, called “preparatory inhibition”, reflects the operation of processes that suppress motor activity to withhold prep...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows stimulating targeted cortical areas non-invasively in humans. When applied over primary motor cortex (M1), TMS can yield electrical responses in contralateral hand muscles, called motor-evoked potentials (MEPs). Comparing MEPs in different contexts has allowed to identify various neural processes, incl...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the primary motor cortex (M1), elicits motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in contralateral limb muscles which are valuable indicators of corticospinal excitability (CSE) at the time of stimulation. So far, most studies have used single-coil TMS over one M1, yielding MEPs in muscles of a single limb –...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
What is the defining property of addiction; what comes first and what follows? In a recent study, Quoilin and Duque (2015) [1] showed deficits in motor inhibition in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients. While this lack of inhibition may represent interesting biological predictors of alcoholism, it is unclear whether these impairments were present before the pathology or resulted exclusively from the brain damage occurring following chronic alcohol exposure; which came first, which followed. This question is the focus of this project. References: [1]C. Quoilin, J. Duque; SY19-4 DEFICIENT MOTOR INHIBITORY MECHANISMS IN ALCOHOL-DEPENDENCE: A TMS STUDY, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 50, Issue suppl_1, 1 September 2015, Pages i22,
Project
Testing if a double-coil TMS method where the two M1 are stimulated with a 1ms inter-pulse interval (double-coil1ms) is a reliable method to measure corticospinal excitability bilaterally.