Julie Gonneaud

Julie Gonneaud
McGill University | McGill · Douglas Mental Health University Institute

PhD

About

103
Publications
10,223
Reads
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909
Citations
Introduction
I did a PhD (sup.: B. Desgranges, University of Caen) on the effect of age on prospective memory, using neuropsychological tests, virtual reality and fMRI. I then joined G. Chetelat's team (Caen) to work on multimodal imaging of Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on genetic aspects (APOE4, familial AD). In the meantime, I've been involved at the faculty of Psychology. In 2016, I joined the Villeneuve Lab (McGill University) to work on multimodal imaging of people with a familial history of AD.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
McGill University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2012 - September 2016
Université de Caen Normandie
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2008 - August 2016
Université de Caen Normandie
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2008 - December 2012
Université de Caen Normandie
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2007 - July 2008
September 2005 - July 2007
Université Savoie Mont Blanc
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (103)
Article
Importance: National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) workgroups have proposed biological research criteria intended to identify individuals with preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD). Objective: To assess the clinical value of these biological criteria to identify older individuals without cognitive impairment who are at near-te...
Article
Background and Objectives Self-reflection (the active evaluation of ones thoughts, feelings and behaviours) can confer protection against adverse health outcomes. Its impact on markers sensitive to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, is unknown. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between self-reflectio...
Article
Vascular risk factors such as hyperglycemia and platelet hyperactivation play a significant role in type 2 diabetes (T2D), a risk factor for AD. We investigated the relationships between glycemia levels, platelet indices (platelet count; mean platelet volume (MPV)) and AD neuroimaging markers in 105 cognitively unimpaired adults, including 21 amylo...
Article
Full-text available
Background: This study assesses the relationships between dynamic functional network connectivity (DFNC) and dementia risk. Methods: DFNC of the default mode (DMN), salience (SN), and executive control networks was assessed in 127 cognitively unimpaired older adults. Stepwise regressions were performed with dementia risk and protective factors a...
Preprint
Importance National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association (NIA-AA) workgroups have proposed biological research criteria intended to identify individuals with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objective Assess the clinical value of these biological criteria for prediction of near-term cognitive impairment in cognitively unimpaired older i...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Physical activity has been associated with a decreased risk for dementia, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain to be determined. Our objective was to assess whether cardiovascular risk factors mediate the association between physical activity and brain integrity markers in older adults. Methods Participants from the Age-...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Poor vascular health may impede brain functioning in older adults, thus possibly increasing the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The emerging link between vascular risk factors (VRF) and longitudinal decline in resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) within functional brain networks needs replication and fur...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Physical inactivity and female sex are independently associated with increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) lifetime risk. This study investigates the possible interactions between sex and physical activity on neuroimaging biomarkers. Methods: In 134 cognitively unimpaired older adults (≥65 years, 82 women) from the Age-Well randomized...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Deepening our understanding of the mechanisms by which meditation practices impact well-being and human flourishing is essential for advancing the science of meditation. A recent phenomenologically grounded classification system distinguishes attentional, constructive, and deconstructive forms of meditation based on the psychological mec...
Article
Objective: To evaluate novel plasma p-tau231, p-tau181 as well as Aβ40 and Aβ42 assays as indicators of tau and Aβ pathologies measured with positron emission tomography (PET), and their association with cognitive change, in cognitively unimpaired older adults. Methods: In a cohort of 244 older adults at risk of AD owing to a family history of A...
Preprint
Medial temporal lobe (MTL) sub-structures are differentially affected in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD), with a specific involvement of the entorhinal cortex (ERC), the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and CA1. However, the impact of amyloid (Aβ) pathology and APOE ε4 on MTL subregional atrophy remains relatively unknown. Our aim was to uncover these effect...
Article
Full-text available
Resting state functional connectivity (rs-fMRI) is impaired early in persons who subsequently develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia. This impairment may be leveraged to aid investigation of the pre-clinical phase of AD. We developed a model that predicts brain age from resting state (rs)-fMRI data, and assessed whether genetic determinants of A...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions, more specifically the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex (ERC), are particularly affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the specific impact of amyloid (Aβ) pathology and APOE ε4 on MTL subregional atrophy remains relatively unknown. Our aim was to uncover these effects to further...
Article
Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) denotes self‐reported cognitive concerns in the absence of objective cognitive impairment. Individuals with SCD convert to dementia at twice the annual rate of healthy controls, with relatively poorer cognition in SCD conferring additional risk. Non‐pharmacological interventions are currently undergoing intensive...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is an increasing research focus on type 2 diabetes (T2D) as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (Lee, 2018). T2D is a disease characterized notably by hyperglycemia and platelet hyper‐reactivity (Schneider, 2009). However, relatively little is known about subclinical but high levels of glycemia and platelet reactivity in the context of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sleep, especially slow wave sleep (SWS), favors efficient cognitive functioning. This effect may be impaired in aging, but might be modulated by cognitive reserve. Indeed, a study reported that highly educated older adults were able to better tolerate the negative effects of subjective sleep disturbances on verbal fluency scores. Growing evidence a...
Article
The COVID‐19 pandemic and the associated distancing measures dramatically affect psychoaffective health, and this is accentuated in older adults who are more vulnerable to the situation. In this study, we are interested in the predictors of emotional resilience in healthy older adults, and also on how the repetition of confinement periods could inf...
Article
Self‐reflection is conceptualised as an introspective process that involves active evaluation of one’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours. Engagement in self‐reflection is thought to yield more adaptive stress responses, that in turn result in better short‐term (e.g., reduced inflammatory responses to stressors) and long‐term (e.g., recovery from ma...
Article
Physical activity (PA) has been associated with decreased risk of dementia, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain to be determined. One hypothesis is that PA might reduce cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), which in turn would benefit brain health. Our objective was to assess the role of CVRFs in the association between PA and neur...
Article
Full-text available
As the population ages, understanding how to maintain older adults' cognitive abilities is essential. Bilingualism has been linked to higher cognitive reserve, better performance in executive control, changes in brain structure and function relative to monolinguals, and delay in dementia onset. Learning a second language thus seems a promising aven...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ) assesses complex mental activity across the life-course and has been associated with brain and cognitive health. The different education systems and occupation classifications across countries represent a challenge for international comparisons. The objectives of this study were four-fold:...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a major health and societal issue; there is no treatment to date and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease are not well understood. Yet, there is hope that AD risk factors and thus the number of AD cases can be significantly reduced by prevention measures based on lifestyle modifications as ta...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are often described in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but their topography and specific relationships with cognition remain unclear. Methods: Regional WMH were estimated in 54 cognitively impaired amyloid beta-positive AD (Aβpos-AD), compared to 40 cognitively unimpaired amyloid beta-negative older co...
Article
Full-text available
Beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins, the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are believed to spread through connected regions of the brain. Combining diffusion imaging and positron emission tomography, we investigated associations between white matter microstructure specifically in bundles connecting regions where Aβ or tau accumulat...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Older adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline (SCD) have a heightened risk of developing dementia and frequently experience subclinical anxiety, which is itself associated with dementia risk. Objective: To understand whether subclinical anxiety symptoms in SCD can be reduced through behavioral interventions. Methods: SCD...
Article
Full-text available
Background As the population ages, maintaining mental health and well-being of older adults is a public health priority. Beyond objective measures of health, self-perceived quality of life (QoL) is a good indicator of successful aging. In older adults, it has been shown that QoL is related to structural brain changes. However, QoL is a multi-facete...
Article
Full-text available
Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are frequently found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Commonly considered as a marker of cerebrovascular disease, regional WMH may be related to pathological hallmarks of AD, including beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to examine the regional distribution of WMH ass...
Conference Paper
White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are a frequent marker of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although WMH have been commonly linked to cerebrovascular disease, recent studies suggest an association between AD pathology and regional WMH distribution. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of AD neuroimagin...
Conference Paper
Brain white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are frequent in older adults, including cognitively unimpaired individuals and are associated to decreased cognitive performances. The prevalence of WMH and their links with cognitive performance and with cortical β‐amyloid (Aβ) burden have been rarely assessed in younger adults. The aim of this study was t...
Poster
The Lifetime of Experiences questionnaire (LEQ, Valenzuela and Sachdev, 2007) is an instrument that comprehensively assesses mental activity (education/occupation and leisure activities) across the lifespan (13‐30, 30‐65, 65‐present). The LEQ has been associated with brain health outcomes and cognitive decline. Challenges for the use of this questi...
Conference Paper
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a multifactorial disease, characterized not only by pathological protein aggregation (Ab and tau), but also by early vascular dysfunctions and functional connectivity alterations (Iturria‐Medina 2016; van der Kant 2019). The study objective was to investigate the association between different markers of vascular health a...
Conference Paper
White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are frequent in the older adults and are associated to worse cognitive performances and to dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with greater brain WMH volume, particularly in posterior regions, compared to cognitively unimpaired older adults. The aim of this study was to assess in details the topography of...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Reserve, resilience, maintenance, and related concepts are intensely debated in aging and Alzheimer's disease research. Methods: Through a short survey, we gathered information about theoretical concepts and methodologies used among research groups of the Reserve, Resilience, and Protective Factors Professional Interest Area of the...
Article
Full-text available
Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are very frequent in older adults and associated with worse cognitive performance. Little is known about the links between WMH and vascular risk factors, cortical β-amyloid (Aβ) load, and cognition in cognitively unimpaired adults across the entire lifespan, especially in young and middle-aged adults....
Article
Objective To determine whether years of education and the ε4 risk allele at APOE influence β-amyloid pathology similarly in asymptomatic individuals with a family history of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and pre-symptomatic autosomal dominant AD mutation carriers. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 106 asymptomatic individuals with...
Article
Time-based prospective memory (TBPM) allows us to remember to perform intended actions at a specific time in the future. TBPM is sensitive to the effects of age, but the neural substrates of this decline are still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was thus to better characterize the brain substrates of the age-related decline in TBPM,...
Preprint
We aimed at developing a model able to predict brain aging from resting state functional connectivity (rs-fMRI) and assessing whether genetic risk/determinants of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyloid (Aβ) pathology contributes to accelerated brain aging. Using data collected in 1340 cognitively unimpaired participants from 18 to 94 years old select...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The Cognitive Debt hypothesis proposes that repetitive negative thinking (RNT), a modifiable process common to many psychological risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) may itself increase risk. We sought to empirically examine relationships between RNT and markers of AD, compared with anxiety and depression symptoms. Methods: T...
Article
Full-text available
Importance Vascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but it is unclear whether there is a direct association of these risk factors with AD pathogenesis. Objectives To assess the associations of vascular risk factors with AD pathogenesis in asymptomatic individuals, and to test whether this association is m...
Article
Objective: To investigate relationships between flortaucipir (FTP) uptake, age, and established Alzheimer disease (AD) markers in asymptomatic adults at increased risk of AD. Methods: One-hundred nineteen individuals with a family history of AD (Presymptomatic Evaluation of Experimental or Novel Treatments of Alzheimer's Disease [PREVENT-AD] coh...
Article
Age being the main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, it is particularly challenging to disentangle structural changes related to normal brain ageing from those specific to Alzheimer's disease. Most studies aiming to make this distinction focused on older adults only and on a priori anatomical regions. Drawing on a large, multi-cohort dataset ran...
Article
IMPORTANCE Fluid and imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) are often used interchangeably, but some biomarkers may reveal earlier stages of disease. OBJECTIVE To characterize individuals with tau abnormality indicated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) assay or positron emission tomography (PET). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Between 2010...
Article
We evaluated event-based prospective memory (EBPM) in adolescents with Autism, varying the load of the to-be-performed intentions. We included measures of inhibition, working memory and binding. Results showed that increasing the retrospective memory load reduced performance in controls. In Autism, adolescents were impaired in the low load conditio...
Chapter
The advent of amyloid-beta (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has transformed the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by enabling the quantification of cortical Aβ accumulation and propagation in vivo. This revolutionary tool has made it possible to measure direct associations between Aβ and other AD biomarkers, to identify factors that...
Article
Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is a clinical entity with various potential etiologies including but not limited to Alzheimer's disease. We examined whether a positive ([18F]Florbetapir) beta amyloid positron emission tomography scan, supporting underlying Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, was associated with specific memory deficits i...
Preprint
It remains unclear which grey matter (GM) changes are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and how these changes might differ from normal brain aging. Using independent component analysis of GM maps on a large, multi-cohort dataset, we derived morphometric networks and investigated GM volume in such networks in young, old adulthood, and AD. GM...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Research suggests that prospective memory (PM) is impaired from the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to further characterize this impairment in patients with mild AD, using a virtual reality (VR) task to provide ecological assessment of PM. Methods: Fifteen cognitively normal older individuals (76.47 years old ± 4...
Article
Introduction Subjectively experienced cognitive decline in older adults is an indicator of increased risk for dementia and is also associated with increased levels of anxiety symptoms. As anxiety is itself emerging as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the primary question of the present study is whether an 8-week mindfulness-based i...
Poster
Full-text available
Objective: To investigate relationships between tau-PET binding and in vivo Alzheimer’s disease (AD) markers in adults at increased risk of sporadic AD. Methods: One-hundred-nineteen cognitively normal older adults with a family history of sporadic AD (PREVENT-AD cohort, mean age=67±5) underwent tau-PET ([18F]AV-1451), Aβ-PET ([18F]NAV4694) and c...
Article
Importance Alzheimer disease (AD) develops during several decades. Presymptomatic individuals might be the best candidates for clinical trials, but their identification is challenging because they have no symptoms. Objective To assess whether a sporadic parental estimated years to symptom onset calculation could be used to identify information abo...
Article
Full-text available
Prospective memory (PM) refers to the ability to remember to execute an intention at the appropriate moment in the future, which can be performed either at the appearance of an event (event-based, EBPM) or after a certain amount of time (time-based, TBPM). PM is generally impaired during aging but the cerebral substrates of this decline have been l...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is associated with progressive cerebral volume and glucose metabolism decreases. Conditions such as stress and sleep difficulties exacerbate these changes and are risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Meditation practice, aiming towards stress reduction and emotion regulation, can downregulate these adverse factors. In this pilot study, we ex...
Article
Objective: To improve our understanding of early β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation processes using florbetapir-PET scan in 20- to 60-year-old individuals. Methods: Seventy-six cognitively normal individuals aged 20 to 60 years, 57 cognitively normal older individuals (61-84 years old), and 70 patients with mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheim...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurodegeneration. To seek for signs of such pathologies, we compared regional biomarker degrees and patterns of Aβ deposition, glucose hypometabolism, and gray matter volume (GMV) reduction in 3 groups at risk of AD. In elderly carriers of the apolipoprotein...