Julie Franck

Julie Franck
University of Geneva | UNIGE

PhD

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61
Publications
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1,297
Citations

Publications

Publications (61)
Preprint
In this article, we explore the extraction of recursive nested structure in the processing of binary sequences. Our aim was to determine whether the brain learns the higher order regularities of a highly simplified input where only sequential order information marks the hierarchical structure. To this end, we implemented sequence generated by the F...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this article, we explore the extraction of recursive nested structure in the processing of binary sequences. Our aim was to determine whether the brain learns the higher order regularities of a highly simplified input where only sequential order information marks the hierarchical structure. To this end, we implemented sequence generated by the F...
Article
Full-text available
We test the comprehension of transitive sentences in very young learners of Mandarin Chinese using a combination of the weird word order paradigm with the use of pseudo-verbs and the preferential looking paradigm, replicating the experiment of Franck et al. (2013) on French. Seventeen typically-developing Mandarin infants (mean age: 17.4 months) pa...
Article
Full-text available
According to cue-based retrieval theories of sentence comprehension, establishing the syntactic dependency between a verb and the grammatical subject is susceptible to interference from other noun phrases in the sentence. At the verb, the subject must be retrieved from memory, but non-subject nouns that are similar on dimensions that are relevant t...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers occasionally produce verbs that agree with an element that is not the subject, a so-called ‘attractor’; likewise, comprehenders occasionally fail to notice agreement errors when the verb agrees with the attractor. Cross-linguistic studies converge in showing that attraction is modulated by the hierarchical position of the attractor in the...
Article
Full-text available
Research on subject-verb agreement production in SVO languages has shown that objects moved pre-verbally sometimes trigger 'attraction', i.e., erroneous agreement of the verb with the object rather than the subject. Moreover, objects c-commanding one of the agreement positions in the hierarchical structure were found to generate stronger attraction...
Article
Results from a new grammaticality‐judgment experiment in French confirm the published finding in English that sentences containing a Superiority violation involving a bare extracted element and a lexically restricted intervener (e.g., ‘What did which student buy?’), a configuration termed inverse inclusion, are more acceptable than those involving...
Article
Studies on agreement production consistently report an increase in production errors in the presence of an attractor mismatching the agreement feature of the target. In contrast, results from comprehension studies are mixed, ranging from lack of effect to facilitation. We report 2 forced-choice experiments and 2 self-paced reading experiments on nu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speakers occasionally cause the verb to agree with an element that is not the subject, a so-called ‘attractor’; likewise, comprehenders occasionally fail to notice agreement errors when the attractor agrees with the verb. Cross-linguistic studies converge in showing that attraction is modulated by the hierarchical position of the attractor in the s...
Article
Full-text available
Subject and object relative clauses have been studied from the point of view of language acquisition and adult sentence processing. In the adult sentence processing literature, subject relative clauses (RCs) are read faster than object RCs (e.g., Frauenfelder et al. 1980 for French; King and Kutas 1995 for English; Schriefers et al. 1995 for Dutch)...
Article
Previous studies have suggested sentential complementation is the crucial ingredient of language that relates to false-belief (FB) reasoning, while the role of relative clauses (RCs) is less clear. Nevertheless, under the hypothesis that clausal embedding has a meta-representational effect, arguably implied in FB, one expects a link between FB and...
Article
We present a self-organizing approach to sentence processing that sheds new light on notional plurality effects in agreement attraction, using pseudopartitive subject noun phrases (e.g., a bottle of pills). We first show that notional plurality ratings (numerosity judgments for subject noun phrases) predict verb agreement choices in pseudopartitive...
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance verb-argument dependencies generally require the integration of a fronted argument when the verb is encountered for sentence interpretation. Under a parsing model that handles long-distance dependencies through a cue-based retrieval mechanism, retrieval is hampered when retrieval cues also resonate with non-target elements (retrieval...
Poster
Full-text available
Similarity-based interference in the processing of long-distance dependencies (LDDs) is generally assumed to originate during cue-based retrieval: when the retrieval cue matches multiple items, target retrieval is harder (retrieval interference, RI; e.g., McElree 2006). Interference can also arise when items in memory resemble each other in feature...
Chapter
The study of syntactic encoding faces two major questions: How can we characterize the syntactic representations underlying the sentences that speakers build? And how can we characterize the processes that deal with these representations? This chapter addresses these two questions through the lens of the research on how agreement derails in the pro...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body ofwork indicates a close relation between complement clause sentences and Theory ofMind (ToM) in childrenwith autism(e.g., Tager-Flusberg, & Joseph (2005). In Astington, & Baird (Eds.), Why language matters for theory of mind (pp. 298–318). New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press, Lind, & Bowler (2009). Journal of Autism and Develo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
According to Feature Relativized Minimality (fRM; e.g., Friedmann et al. 2009), the degradation of sentences involving intervention is a function of the features' similarity between the extractee and the intervener: ill-formedness is predicted to be stronger when all features match (identity) than when features partially match (inclusion). Moreover...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates effects of syntactic complexity operationalized in terms of movement, intervention, and noun phrase (NP) feature similarity in the development of Aʹ-dependencies in 4-, 6-, and 8-year-old typically developing (TD) French children and children with autism spectrum disorder. Children completed an offline comprehension task tes...
Article
Language down the garden path leads the reader into the meanders of more than forty years of research since the publication of Bever’s 1970 article ‘The cognitive basis for linguistic structure’ (CBLS). The book mirrors the nature of CBLS in compiling an eclectic set of chapters addressing a variety of key theoretical questions, hypotheses, and obs...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Two acceptability judgment experiments were conducted to investigate the role of similarity in weak islands environments. We tested predictions stemming from a narrow approach to similarity (Featural Relativized Minimality) and from a broad approach to similarity (Cue-based memory model) in generating intervention effects. According to Featural Rel...
Poster
Full-text available
We present results from an acceptability judgment study combined with an eye-tracking study on wh-islands with the aim of identifying the locus of the difficulty in the processing of wh-island.
Article
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This study explores (mis)interpretation of bi-clausal wh-questions by French-speaking adults and children, aiming to investigate cross-linguistic differences in sentence revision mechanisms. Following previous work in Japanese (Omaki et al., 2014), the ambiguity of wh-questions was manipulated: in ambiguous questions, the fronted wh-phrase could be...
Poster
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Poster presented at IGG 41 in Perugia (Italy)
Poster
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Poster presented at Cuny 2015 (Los Angeles, US)
Article
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We report three experiments on French that explore number mismatch effects in intervention configurations in the comprehension of object A’-dependencies, relative clauses and questions. The study capitalizes on the finding of object attraction in sentence production, in which speakers sometimes erroneously produce a verb that agrees in number with...
Article
The reference of the following sentence should be Adani et al. (2014) rather than Adani (unpublished). “Adani et al. (2010) and Adani (unpublished) found that both English and Italian speaking children showed better performance in a sentence-picture matching task when the object and the subject of the object relative clause mismatched in number (e...
Article
Full-text available
Word order is one of the earliest aspects of grammar that the child acquires, because her early utterances already respect the basic word order of the target language. However, the question of the nature of early syntactic representations is subject to debate. Approaches inspired by formal syntax assume that the head–complement order, differentiati...
Article
Full-text available
One major controversy in the field of language development concerns the nature of children's early grammatical knowledge. This paper focuses on the early representation of word order. It questions the validity of the results obtained with the Weird Word Order methodology (Akhtar, 1999) in which children are presented with ungrammatical sentences. T...
Article
Full-text available
In their paper Reaching Agreement, Bock and Middleton (2011) review a vast array of psycholinguistic experiments on semantic influences in agreement which they argue provide critical empirical evidence to the longstanding debate about the role of meaning in syntax. The authors propose to unify these findings within the Marking and Morphing model, t...
Article
Full-text available
One major controversy in the field of language development concerns the nature of children's early representations of word order. While studies using preferential looking methods suggest that children as early as 20 months represent word order as an abstract, grammatical property, experiments using the Weird Word Order (WWO) paradigm suggest that i...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines syntactic and morphological aspects of the production and comprehension of pronouns by 99 typically developing French-speaking children aged 3 years, 5 months to 6 years, 5 months. A fine structural analysis of subject, object, and reflexive clitics suggests that whereas the object clitic chain crosses the subject chain, the ref...
Article
Full-text available
The research presented here uses theoretical constructs of formal syntax to account for performance data in agreement production. The phenomenon examined is object interference in French, i.e., incorrect agreement of the verb with the object. In the first experiment, interference is shown to occur in object relative clauses despite the absence of a...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments investigate whether native speakers of French can use a noun's phonological ending to retrieve its gender and that of a gender-marked element. In Experiment 1, participants performed a gender decision task on the noun's gender-marked determiner for auditorily presented nouns. Noun endings with high predictive values were selected. T...
Article
We report four cross-linguistic experiments (in Spanish, Italian and French) testing the influence of morphophonological gender marking in the subject noun phrase on the production of gender agreement. Agreement errors are elicited using a methodology in which participants are required to complete, with a predicative adjective, a sentence preamble....
Article
Full-text available
Mismatch negativity, an index of automatic cerebral activity in response to novel stimuli, was used to determine the onset of morphosyntactic processing in French. Stimuli were four two-word sentences made up of a pronoun (first or second person) and a verb (first or second person). Verb forms differed only in the inflectional suffix, which made th...
Article
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Article
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This paper links experimental psycholinguistics and theoretical syntax in the study of subject-verb agreement. Three experiments of elicited spoken production making use of specific characteristics of Italian and French are presented. They manipulate and examine its impact on the occurrence of 'attraction' errors (i.e. incorrect agreement with a wo...
Article
Full-text available
A number of French-speaking children show difficulties in learning to write, partly as a result of the high complexity of the orthographic system. In order to shed light on the nature of these difficulties, we designed a study which examines the written performances of seven children (mean age 10.0) with learning disabilities (LDS) in comparison to...
Article
We report a study on the spoken production of subject–verb agreement in number by four age groups of normally developing children (between 5 and 8;5) and a group of 8 children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI; between 5;4 and 9;4), all French speaking. The production of verb agreement was experimentally elicited by asking children to complete...
Article
Full-text available
We report two parallel experiments conducted in French and in English in which we induced subject-verb agreement errors to explore the role of syntactic structure during sentence production. Previous studies have shown that attraction errors (i.e., a tendency of the verb to agree with an immediately preceding noun instead of with the subject of the...
Article
In the current paper, we assess whether morphophonological information (consistent, inconsistent or ambiguous with the syntactic information) affects syntactic encoding. We report four experiments (one in Italian, one in French and two in Spanish) in which we elicited gender agreement errors between the subject of a sentence and a predicative adjec...
Article
Full-text available
In five experiments highly-proficient bilinguals were asked to name two sets of pictures in their L2: a) pictures whose names in the L2 and their corresponding L1 translations have the same grammatical gender value, and b) pictures whose names in the L2 and their corresponding L1 translations have different gender values. In Experiments 1, 2, and 3...
Article
Full-text available
We report two experiments that assessed the role of orthography in constraining subject-verb agreement in written (Experiment 1) and spoken (Experiment 2) French. We contrasted a condition in which the singular and plural forms of the subject head nouns were homophones but non-homographs (e.g., chanson, song-S, vs. chansons, songs-P) with a conditi...
Article
In the current paper, we assess whether morphophonological information (consistent, inconsistent or ambiguous with the syntactic information) affects syntactic encoding. We report four experiments (one in Italian, one in French and two in Spanish) in which we elicited gender agreement errors between the subject of a sentence and a predicative adjec...
Article
We report two parallel experiments conducted in French and in English in which we induced subject-verb agreement errors to explore the role of syntactic structure during sentence production. Previous studies have shown that attraction errors (i.e., a tendency of the verb to agree with an immediately preceding noun instead of with the subject of the...
Article
This article addresses the question of whether accuracy in developing a syntactic frame for a to-be-uttered sentence is influenced by conceptual information beyond the initial assignment of grammatical functions on the basis of the speakers' intentions, as predicted by the maximalist hypothesis we put forward in previous work (Vigliocco & Franck, 1...
Article
This paper surveys the literature on grammatical agreement in order to synthesise and distinguish theoretical arguments and experimental data relative to the maximal and minimal input hypotheses. The maximal input hypothesis assumes that during the construction of a syntactic frame for the sentence, the grammatical encoder takes advantage of any re...
Article
Full-text available
This paper surveys the literature on grammatical agreement in order to synthesise and distinguish theoretical arguments and experimental data relative to the maximal and minimal input hypotheses. The maximal input hypothesis assumes that during the construction of a syntactic frame for the sentence, the grammatical encoder takes advantage of any re...
Article
In four experiments (two in French and two in Italian), we investigated whether the language production system uses conceptual information regarding biological gender in the encoding of gender agreement between a subject and a predicate. Both French and Italian have a nominal gender system that includes a distinction between nouns reflecting the se...
Article
Full-text available
The research presented uses theoretical constructs of formal syn-tax as tools to capture performance data in agreement production. The phenomenon examined is interference in subject–verb agreement. A general overview of our experimental findings which highlights the different syntactic factors involved in inter-ference is provided. A fine-grained c...
Article
Full-text available
Julie.Franck@pse.unige.ch Experimental research on agreement production has provided compelling evidence that the interference produced by a syntactic element intervening between the subject and its verb (e.g., *The son of the neighbours are absent) is sensitive to the hierarchical position of this attractor (e.g., Vigliocco & Nicol, 1998). Our res...
Article
Full-text available
Alario and Caramazza (2002) have suggested that during noun production, gender and phonological information are both involved in determiner selection, although they act independently. They also suggested that this process occurs later in French than in other languages like German and Dutch. One possible reason is that in French, some determiner for...

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Projects (3)
Project
We provided evidence for a reverse effect of number and gender mismatch in the comprehension and production of object relative clauses in French.
Project
We conducted several self-paced reading experiments on object relatives, taking advantage of grammatical properties of English, Italian and French in order to tease apart encoding and retrieval interference effects.