Julie Flynn

Julie Flynn
University of Southern Queensland  · School of Nursing and Midwifery

Doctor of Philosophy

About

27
Publications
11,476
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422
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Background: Needleless connectors (NCs) are essential devices designed to provide safe, needle-free connection between venous access devices, syringes and infusions. There is a variety of designs, and associated decontamination products and practices; the resulting confusion can cause detrimental patient outcomes. This study aimed to explore nurse...
Article
Background Documentation and assessment of progress in labour using a partograph is recommended by the World Health Organisation to assist in the timely recognition of labour dystocia. Recent studies have tested new designs of partographs that aim to account for more variable rates of labour progress. However, other studies have suggested that poor...
Article
Background : Fetal occipto-posterior position during labour can contribute to negative outcomes. Encouraging women to adopt positions utilising thigh flexion with the aim of increasing pelvic diameters and promoting fetal rotation to the occpito-anterior position are often used. However, the efficacy of these strategies has not yet been determined....
Article
Full-text available
Background: Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are ubiquitous medical devices, crucial to providing essential fluids and drugs. However, post-insertion PIVC failure occurs frequently, likely due to inconsistent maintenance practice such as flushing. The aim of this implementation study was to evaluate the impact a multifaceted intervention c...
Article
Full-text available
Pilot randomized controlled trial (180 patients) of needleless connector decontamination. Central line-associated bloodstream infection occurred in 2% (1/61) of 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) wipe, 2% (1/59) of 70% IPA cap, and zero (0/58) infections in 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% IPA wipe patients. Larger definitive trials are feasible and need...
Article
Aim To test the feasibility of an efficacy trial comparing different flushing frequencies and volumes to reduce peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) failure in paediatric inpatients. Methods Pilot, 2 × 2 factorial, randomised controlled trial comparing PIVC flushing techniques in intervention pairs: (i) low volume (3 mL) versus high volume (10 mL...
Article
Background: The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness of connector decontamination with 70% alcohol wipes, alcoholic chlorhexidine gluconate wipes, or alcohol impregnated caps to prevent catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI). Methods: A systematic search was conducted in CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Contro...
Article
Full-text available
Background Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are commonly used for delivering intravenous therapy. PICC failure is unacceptably high (up to 40%) due to mechanical, infectious and thrombotic complications. Poor securement potentiates all complication types. This randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed to examine the feasibility of a la...
Article
Our data suggest that the ideal method of needleless connector decontamination is 30 seconds with CHG swabs, although even 5-second CHG swabbing outperformed other methods. However, poor compliance with active decontamination method may negate the effectiveness of CHG swabbing. CHG swabbing also leaves a residue on the external surface of the needl...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Research has identified high failure rates of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) and varied flushing practices. Methods: This is a single-centre, pilot, non-masked, factorial randomised controlled trial. Participants were adults, with a PIVC of expected use ≥24 hours (n = 160), admitted to general medical or surgical wards of a t...
Article
Background: Peripheral vascular catheters (PVC) are the most frequently used invasive medical devices in hospitals, with 330 million sold each year in the USA alone. One in three UK inpatients at any one time has at least one PVC in situ according to the Scottish National Prevalence survey. Method: A narrative review of studies describing the in...
Article
Background: Up to 85% of hospital in-patients will require some form of vascular access device to deliver essential fluids, drug therapy, nutrition and blood products, or facilitate sampling. The failure rate of these devices is unacceptably high, with 20-69% of peripheral intravenous catheters and 15-66% of central venous catheters failing due to...
Article
The aim of this study was to determine whether a variation in practice from an aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) to a sterile technique when changing needleless connectors on central venous access devices (CVAD) was associated with any change in catheter related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rates in the bone marrow transplant (BMT) population. A...
Article
Full-text available
Background. Needleless connectors (NC) are used on virtually all intravascular devices, providing an easy access point for infusion connection. Colonization of NC is considered the cause of 50% of postinsertion catheter-related infections. Breaks in aseptic technique, from failure to disinfect, result in contamination and subsequent biofilm formati...
Article
To assess the effectiveness of four securement methods to prevent peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) failure. A single-centre, four-arm, randomised, controlled, non-blinded, superiority pilot trial was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital in Queensland (Australia), between November 2012 and January 2013. Adult patients, with a PIVC expecte...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Working to complete a thesis of publications with the theme Vessel Health and Preservation.