Julie Crudele

Julie Crudele
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Neurology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
3,414
Reads
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479
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
417 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. Julie M. Crudele currently works as an Acting Assistant Professor at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Crudele works on AAV gene therapy for muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked myotubular myopathy, focusing on maximizing vector efficacy and immunological safety.
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - present
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2010 - March 2015
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2009 - April 2010
University of Pennsylvania
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2008 - November 2014
University of Pennsylvania
Field of study
  • Cell and Molecular Biology; Gene Therapy and Vaccines
September 2002 - June 2006
Dartmouth College
Field of study
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) are a major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A, affecting approximately 20% to 30% of patients. Current treatment for inhibitors is based on long-term, daily injections of large amounts of FVIII protein. Liver-directed gene therapy has been used to induce antigen-specific tolerance, but there...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging successful clinical data on gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector for hemophilia B (HB) showed that the risk of cellular immune response to vector capsid is clearly dose-dependent. To decrease the vector dose we explored AAV-8 (1-3 x 10(12) vg/kg) encoding a hyperfunctional factor IX (FIX-Padua, arginine 338 to leucine) in...
Article
Gene-editing has shown promise for correcting or bypassing dystrophin mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, pre-clinical studies have focused on young animals with limited muscle fibrosis and wasting, thereby favoring muscle transduction, myonuclear editing and prevention of disease progression. Here we explore muscle-specific dy...
Article
Full-text available
Following the publication of this paper [1], it was brought to the authors' attention that one of the contributing authors was left off of the paper. The authors apologize for the unfortunate oversight. In this correction paper, they have included Dr. Paola Tonino in the author list section.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Nebulin is a critical thin filament-binding protein that spans from the Z-disk of the skeletal muscle sarcomere to near the pointed end of the thin filament. Its massive size and actin-binding property allows it to provide the thin filaments with structural and regulatory support. When this protein is lost, nemaline myopathy occurs. Ne...
Article
Full-text available
Muscular dystrophy is a group of progressive genetic diseases affecting the musculature which are characterized by inflammatory infiltrates, necrosis and connective tissue and fat replacement of the affected muscles. Unfortunately, treatments do not exist for the vast majority of muscular dystrophy patients. Adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-base...
Chapter
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked disease caused by mutations in the massive dystrophin gene that lead to extremely low or non-detectable levels of dystrophin. Conversely, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a highly variable and significantly less severe disease that results from truncated or poorly expressed dystrophin variant...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 is a genome-editing technology1,2 that utilizes archaeal and bacterial Cas9 nucleases to introduce double-stranded breaks in DNA at targeted sites. These breaks can be used to remove, replace, or add pieces of DNA. While not the first genome editor, CRISPR-Cas9 is effi...
Article
Full-text available
Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current...
Article
Full-text available
Treatment of hemophilia, which involves infusion of the missing clotting factor, is often hindered by the development of neutralizing antibodies to the replaced clotting factor. We utilized liver-directed AAV gene therapy to tolerize outbred hemophiliac dogs with pre-existing anti-factor VIII and IX antibodies and to treat their underlying hemophil...
Article
The paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE)/Furin is a protein convertase system that plays a vital role in several biological processes, including coagulation. The propeptide processing of human FIX by PACE/Furin is a critical posttranslational modification, so cells co-expressing PACE/Furin and FIX are used for production of clinical recom...
Article
Emerging data from early phase clinical studies of AAV gene therapy for hemophilia B (HB) (factor IX [FIX] deficiency) show sustained expression of therapeutic levels of FIX and phenotypic improvement. However, the safety and efficacy of in vivo gene therapy is limited by the vector dose. Recently, we reported a naturally occurring, hyperfunctional...
Article
3350 Cancer is frequently associated with activation of coagulation, and a procoagulant state facilitates tumor metastasis. Recent studies have suggested that the activated protein C (aPC) pathway plays a role in modulating tumor metastasis, and this protection likely requires both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects of aPC. Notably, our e...

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