Julie Carrier

Julie Carrier
Université de Montréal | UdeM · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

234
Publications
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11,966
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Publications

Publications (234)
Conference Paper
Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for cognitive decline, but the effect of sex on this association is unknown. This study aims at characterizing the relationship between risk of OSA and cognitive function in older men and women. Method: We included 152 women (73 ± 6 years) and 89 men (75 ± 6 years) matched for education, ag...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is associated with reduced slow wave (SW) density (number SW/min in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep) and amplitude. It has been proposed that an age-related decrease in SW density may be due to a reduction in EEG amplitude instead of a decline in the capacity to generate SW. Here, we propose a data-driven approach to adapt SW amplitude criteria...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Slow waves and spindles are essential oscillations occurring during NREM sleep that may be disrupted by moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated these oscillations in the acute and chronic trauma stage. Methods Four groups were tested with whole-night polysomnography: hospitalized patients with acute TBI (n=10,...
Article
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Introduction Brain topography modulates age-related changes in the human sleep electroencephalogram, which are linked with differences in integrity of specific cortical areas and may reflect local changes in sleep homeostasis. In mice, there is conflicting evidence regarding the topography of age-related changes for NREM and REM sleep. To disambigu...
Article
25th Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society (ESRS), ELECTR NETWORK, SEP 22-24, 2020
Conference Paper
Introduction: Recent studies have suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for cognitive deficits in cognitively healthy older adults. However, whether this association exists in older adults who present abnormal cognitive decline is unknown. This study aims at characterizing the relationship between risk of OSA and episodic me...
Article
Full-text available
There is now ample evidence that sleep spindles play a critical role in the consolidation of newly acquired motor sequences. Previous studies have also revealed that the interplay between different types of sleep oscillations (e.g. spindles, slow waves, sharp-wave ripples) promotes the consolidation process of declarative memories. Yet the function...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk for mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Identifying patients who will present cognitive decline is crucial in treatment decision, particularly for patients with no or mild daytime sleepiness. We aim to characterize the ability of two cognitive screening tests, the Mini-Mental State Examina...
Conference Paper
Introduction Accumulating evidence demonstrates a direct relationship between impaired neural integrity and disrupted sleep physiology in normal and pathological aging. However, previous work has focused almost exclusively on NREM sleep as a proxy of cortical integrity with aging. Whether this relationship holds true for REM sleep is unknown. This...
Poster
Introduction Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is a prodrome of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), offers the opportunity to identify AD-related markers before the dementia phase. Cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, which degenerate early in AD, play a major role during Rapid-Eye-Movement (REM) sleep, at a time when several other neuronal systems are...
Poster
Full-text available
Measuring interactions between thalamus, hippocampus and cortex during sleep spindles: Combining MEG and machine learning
Article
Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Anatomical gray matter abnormalities in the motor cortico-subcortical loop areas remain under studied in iRBD patients. We acquired T1-weighted images and administrated quantitative motor tasks in 41 patients wi...
Article
Slow waves occurring during non-rapid eye movement sleep have been associated with neurobehavioural performance and memory. In addition, the duration of previous wakefulness and sleep impacts characteristics of these slow waves. However, molecular mechanisms regulating the dynamics of slow-wave characteristics remain poorly understood. The EphA4 re...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction Sleep disturbances may play an important role in the pathophysiology of both depression and cardiovascular dysfunctions. Previous observations suggested atypical patterns of heart rate changes in people with depression, often marked by elevated and unstable heart rate during sleep. This study assessed the validity of novel biomarkers b...
Article
Introduction NREM sleep markers like sleep spindles are crucial for brain plasticity and their density, amplitude and duration decrease in aging. Few studies were able to entrain NREM sleep oscillations using transcranial alternating stimulation (TACS) and to enhance sleep-dependent memory consolidation. This pilot study aimed to induce sleep spind...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Subjective cognitive complaint (SCC) increases the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has recently been identified as a risk factor of MCI and dementia in the elderly. However, the ability of SCC to predict cognitive dysfunction and cognitive decline over time among individual with OSA n...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction Aging is associated with modifications in waking electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence, a measure of cerebral functional connectivity. EEG coherence in the alpha frequency band was reported to be lower in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep than during wakefulness in young individuals. The aim of this study was to compare EEG functional c...
Article
Introduction Light, particularly blue light, increases alertness, performance and cognitive brain responses, but age-related decrease in the effects of light has been reported. The extent to which these age-related modifications are caused by changes at the level of the eye (because of senile miosis and lens yellowing) or the brain is unclear. Met...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Chronic sleep-wake disturbances are among the most invalidating and frequently reported symptoms following a traumatic brain injury (TBI), but their pathophysiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. We aimed to explore potential mechanisms by which anatomical damage due to TBI, more specifically white matter damage, can cause...
Conference Paper
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Introduction Cerebral white matter is especially vulnerable to hypoxic damage, and thus, may be affected by nocturnal repetitive hypoxemia that is characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Mean diffusivity (MD) can serve as a marker of cerebral white matter integrity, and has been observed to decrease in the acute stage of an ischemic stroke...
Conference Paper
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Introduction Research report robust change in functional connectivity (FC) during waking resting state after sleep loss. Studies indicate that older participants show smaller or similar effects to acute sleep loss on vigilance and cognition as compared to the young. However, age-related effects of sleep loss on FC have not been reported. The presen...
Article
Introduction Autism is a developmental disorder with a neurobiological etiology. Studies of the autistic brain point toward atypically organized brain networks which may lead to a lower capacity to synchronize the EEG during sleep. We compared the intrisic characteristics and topography of nonREM sleep EEG slow waves (SW) in autistic and neurotypic...
Article
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Motor memory consolidation is thought to depend on sleep-dependent reactivation of brain areas recruited during learning. However, up to this point, there has been no direct evidence to support this assertion in humans, and the physiological processes supporting such reactivation are unknown. Here, simultaneous electroencephalographic and functiona...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep spindles and K-complexes are among the most prominent micro-events observed in electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during sleep. These EEG microstructures are thought to be hallmarks of sleep-related cognitive processes. Although tedious and time-consuming, their identification and quantification is important for sleep studies in both he...
Article
Introduction: Prodromal markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been derived from wakefulness. However, brain perfusion during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep could be a sensitive marker of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), as activation of REM sleep relies more on the cholinergic system. Methods: Eight subjects with aMCI, and 16 contro...
Article
Study objectives Although sleepwalking (somnambulism) affects up to 4% of adults, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Sleepwalking can be preceded by fluctuations in slow-wave sleep EEG signals, but the significance of these pre-episode changes remains unknown and methods based on EEG functional connectivity have yet to be used to better...
Article
Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent hypoxemia, hemodynamic fluctuations, and sleep fragmentation, all of which could damage cerebral gray matter that can be indirectly assessed with neuroimaging. Objectives: To investigate whether markers of obstructive sleep apnea severity are associated with gray matter changes among middle-...
Article
Sleep is necessary for the optimal consolidation of procedural learning, and in particular, for motor sequential skills. Motor sequence learning (MSL) remains intact with age, but sleep-dependent consolidation is impaired, suggesting that memory deficits for procedural skills are specifically impacted by age-related changes in sleep. Age-related ch...
Article
While maternal influences on young children’s sleep are increasingly documented, the study of paternal contributions to this important sphere of child functioning is only just beginning. In addition, much of this emerging research has focused on infancy only or has relied on parental reports of child sleep. The current study aimed to examine the as...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we propose an Internet of Things (IoT) system application for remote medical monitoring. The body pressure distribution is acquired through a pressure sensing mattress under the person's body, data is sent to a computer workstation for processing, and results are communicated for monitoring and diagnosis. The area of application of s...
Article
Older adults show impaired consolidation in motor sequence learning (MSL) tasks, failing to demonstrate the sleep-dependant performance gains usually seen in young individuals. To date, few studies have investigated the white matter substrates of MSL in healthy aging, and none have addressed how fiber pathways differences may contribute to the age-...
Article
Full-text available
Among the most exciting open questions in neuroscience is why and how sleep benefits our cognitive functions. Although the “why” remains a controversial topic, there is increasing evidence that a partial answer to the “how” may be found in spindle oscillations (~8–16 Hz). Spindle oscillations are central in a large variety of brain functions includ...
Article
Unlabelled: It is hypothesized that a fundamental function of sleep is to restore an individual's day-to-day ability to learn and to constantly adapt to a changing environment through brain plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is among the key regulators that shape brain plasticity. However, advancing age and carrying the BDNF Met...
Article
Full-text available
Although numerous studies have convincingly demonstrated that sleep plays a critical role in motor sequence learning (MSL) consolidation, the specific contribution of the different sleep stages in this type of memory consolidation is still contentious. To probe the role of stage 2 non-REM sleep (NREM2) in this process, we used a conditioning protoc...
Article
Full-text available
Notwithstanding its effects on the classical visual system allowing image formation, light acts upon several non-image-forming (NIF) functions including body temperature, hormonal secretions, sleep-wake cycle, alertness, and cognitive performance. Studies have shown that NIF functions are maximally sensitive to blue wavelengths (460–480 nm), in com...
Article
Full-text available
View largeDownload slide REM sleep is regulated by the cholinergic system, which shows early degeneration in Parkinson’s disease with cognitive impairment. Latreille et al . reveal that EEG abnormalities during REM sleep predict subsequent dementia in patients with Parkinson’s disease. These prodromal biomarkers will aid early diagnosis and identi...
Chapter
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In the past decade, our understanding of the sleep and emotion mechanisms in young adults has markedly increased. Recent findings suggest that sleep stages could play a crucial role in emotion regulation processes. This chapter considers how sleep and emotion regulation processes change across the life span, exploring possible interrelations betwee...
Article
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Background and objectives: The onset of pervasive sleep-wake disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is poorly understood. This study aimed to (a) determine the feasibility of using polysomnography in patients in the acute, hospitalized stage of severe TBI and (b) explore sleep quality and sleep architecture during this stage of...
Article
The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent and longitudinal relations between sleep and externalizing symptoms among young children. Sixty-four families (mostly Caucasian; 36 boys) were met twice, when children were 2 (T1) and 4 years of age (T2). At T1, children wore an actigraph monitor for a 72-hr period, and both mothers and father...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11-15 Hz; >0.5 s) help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g., daytime), even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explo...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep slow waves (SWs) change considerably throughout normal aging. In humans, SWs are generated and propagate on a structural backbone of highly interconnected cortical regions that form most of the default mode network, such as the insula, cingulate cortices, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and medial frontal lobe. Regions in this network undergo c...
Article
Concussions exert persistent effects on asymptomatic athletes, especially women. Among chief mechanisms of concussion recovery are alterations of neuronal plasticity. Olfactory function, often impaired following a concussion, greatly involves plasticity and, therefore, appears as a good candidate to study the deleterious effects of concussions. The...
Article
During the middle years of life, sleep becomes more fragile and its sensitivity to psychostimulants may increase. This study evaluated the effects of 200 mg and 400 mg of caffeine on sleep in young and middle-aged adults. The sleep of 22 young (23.5 ± 1.9 years) and 24 middle-aged (51.7 ± 11.5 years) adults was recorded using polysomnography in two...
Article
Many scholars have proposed that parent-child attachment security should favor child sleep. Research has yet, however, to provide convincing support for this hypothesis. The current study used objective measures of sleep and attachment to assess the longitudinal links between mother-child attachment security and subsequent sleep, controlling for ch...
Article
Full-text available
EEG sleep spindles are short (0.5-2.0 s) bursts of activity in the 11-16 Hz band occurring during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This sporadic activity is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, brain plasticity, and protection of sleep integrity. Many automatic detectors have been proposed to assist or replace experts for sleep spind...
Article
Full-text available
It is now accepted that hippocampal- and striatal-dependent memory systems do not act independently, but rather interact during both memory acquisition and consolidation. However, the respective functional roles of the hippocampus and the striatum in these processes remain unknown. Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in a da...
Article
Full-text available
The current study examined associations among actigraphy, maternal sleep diaries, and the parent-completed child behavior checklist (CBCL) sleep items. These items are often used as a sleep measure despite their unclear validity with young children. Eighty middle class families (39 girls) drawn from a community sample participated. Children (M = 25...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we devel...
Article
L’objectif de cette revue est d’évaluer les effets de l’exposition exogène et endogène à la testostérone chez l’homme et aux estrogènes et à la progestérone chez la femme sur le sommeil. Les niveaux de testostérone sont maximaux lors du sommeil et la privation de sommeil supprime la testostérone. Peu d’études ont évalué les effets de la diminution...