Julie Bull

Julie Bull
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PhD; Master's of Applied Health Services Research; Honors BA (Psychology and Philosophy; First Class Standing)

About

16
Publications
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Introduction
Julie Bull is an Inuk (NunatuKavut) researcher and educator from Happy Valley – Goose Bay, Labrador with nearly 15 years of experience in community-based participatory action research, specifically in research involving Indigenous Peoples. As an award-winning researcher, Julie is committed to bridging the gaps between western and Indigenous ways of understanding the world through the lens of research with a focus on social justice. As a forward thinker and seasoned leader, Julie’s vision is to see Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada and around the world work together to achieve common goals. Julie’s main area of research is the governance of research and research ethics involving Indigenous Peoples.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Recent ethics guidelines and policies are changing the way health research is understood, governed, and practiced among Aboriginal communities in Canada. This provides a unique opportunity to examine the meanings and uses of such guidelines by Aboriginal communities themselves. This qualitative study, conducted in Labrador, Canada, with the Innu, I...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on an innovative process by which the Inuit and First Nations communities of Newfoundland and Labrador confronted and challenged the policies and procedures of the provincial research ethics system. We describe the ways in which these communities engaged with health and university research review administrators to exchange inform...
Article
Full-text available
In Toolbox of Principles for Research in Indigenous Contexts: Ethics, Respect, Equity, Reciprocity, Cooperation and Culture. N. Gros-Louis McHugh, K. Gentelet, and S. Basile, eds. First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission. http://www.cssspnql.com/docs/default-source/centre-de-documentation/toolbox_research_princip...
Article
In Labrador, the NunatuKavut (formerly Labrador Inuit Métis) have begun to introduce a rigorous community-based research review process. We conducted a study with leaders and health care workers in and beyond the NunatuKavut community of Labrador, asking them what should be emphasised in a community review. We also sought to identify whether and ho...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Mental health, substance use/addiction and violence (MSV) are important issues affecting the well-being of Indigenous People in Canada. This paper outlines the protocol for a research-to-action program called the Mental Wellness Program (MWP). The MWP aims to increase community capacity, promote relationship-building among communities,...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose For many Indigenous nations globally, ethics is a conversation. The purpose of this paper is to share and mobilize knowledge to build relationships and capacities regarding the ethics review and approval of research with Indigenous peoples throughout Atlantic Canada. The authors share key principles that emerged for shifting practices that...
Article
Full-text available
Some of the world’s most southern Inuit populations live along central and the southeastern coast of Labrador in the territory of NunatuKavut and are represented by the NunatuKavut Community Council (NCC). Southern Inuit and NCC staff have been actively collaborating with researchers and research ethics boards since 2006 on research ethics and the...
Article
In June 2000, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) introduced thirteen new areas for health research, including the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health (IAPH). Fourteen years later, four students involved with Aboriginal health research reflect on their graduate experiences with this CIHR initiative.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Download from: http://www.nunatukavut.ca/home/files/pg/ncha_web.pdf
Article
The establishment of the first ever Aboriginal Support Program at the University of Prince Edward Island led to the development of the Mawi'omi Centre. This Aboriginal Lounge became a welcomed home to support and encourage Aboriginal students on campus. Students, themselves, speak to the value of this lounge and what it means to their education and...
Article
Atlantic Aboriginal Health Research Program: Community-Based Research Publication. 17-23.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
http://www.circumpolarhealthjournal.net/public/journals/32/chs/CHS_2010_7_ICCH14.pdf

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