Julianne Warren

Julianne Warren
Scholar-at-large

Ph.D. in wildlife ecology and conservation biology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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33
Publications
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202
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Publications

Publications (33)
Chapter
Living Earth Community: Multiple Ways of Being and Knowing is a celebration of the diversity of ways in which humans can relate to the world around them, and an invitation to its readers to partake in planetary coexistence. Innovative, informative, and highly accessible, this interdisciplinary anthology of essays brings together scholars, writers a...
Chapter
As Leopold was piecing together the erosion story in the Southwest and beginning his professional game protection work—between 1914 and the mid-1920s—the world was changing rapidly around him. Millions died in the Great War and from an influenza pandemic, and political boundaries in Europe were redrawn. On the American plains farmers plowed million...
Chapter
“Dawn on the Delta was whistled in by Gambel quail.…When the sun peeped over the Sierra Madre, it slanted across a hundred miles of lovely…wilderness rimmed by jagged peaks,” Leopold vividly recalled in his 1940s essay “The Green Lagoons.” The essay recounts the story of a “voyage of discovery” that Aldo and his brother Carl had taken twenty years...
Chapter
Conservation, to Leopold’s mind, was about the relationship between human thoughts and actions and their effects on the land. A civilization functioning in concert with the land’s conservation, he believed, would be not only good for land but also more productive of rich human lives, which were interwoven with it. To best integrate human ways with...
Chapter
By 1933, as Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office as president and initiated the relief programs of his dizzying first 100 days, the American home-building dream had gone in reverse. Home foreclosures were taking place at the rate of more than a thousand per day. New farm technology made farming more efficient and sent countless unneeded agricultur...
Chapter
Leopold returned to the Forest Service in September 1914 after his recuperative leave of absence, which had stretched well over a year. Still weak from his illness, he was assigned to paperwork in the Albuquerque Office of Grazing, where he served as assistant to the district supervisor. The administrative position gave him technical knowledge of r...
Chapter
By the time Leopold wrote “The Farmer as a Conservationist” and “A Biotic View of Land,” his important essays from 1939, he was ready to face again the question he had struggled with since 1913: what was conservation’s object? He was also ready to speak directly about land use in moral terms, a matter he had first broached in 1923.
Chapter
By 1931, two years after the stock market crash, millions of Americans were jobless, homeless, and destitute. “Hoovervilles” arose on the edges of large cities — crude shelters built of packing crates, cardboard, and old metal—while lines of hungry men waited for soup and bread. Families dug through garbage dumps in St. Louis and sought table scrap...
Chapter
In conjunction with his June 1939 talk, “A Biotic View of Land,” before the joint meeting of the Ecological Society of America and the Society of American Foresters, Leopold sent a copy of the address to a respected friend and frequent correspondent, P. S. Lovejoy, asking for a critique. Lovejoy, an Illinois native three years Leopold’s senior—once...
Chapter
By 1909—the start of Aldo Leopold’s professional career—the United States had traveled far on a journey toward material prosperity within its continent of natural bounty. The New World was a cornucopia of land products. Already it had fed industrial revolutions in western Europe and in America, helping to transform the world. Its natural wealth als...
Chapter
Aldo Leopold landed in Casas Grandes, in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, three days before Christmas 1937, just two and half weeks shy of his fifty-first birthday. The flight, his first ever, had taken him over winding streams and arroyos, rocky hills covered with twisted oaks and junipers, and canyons abounding with white-tailed deer and...
Chapter
Leopold composed his ringing descriptions of the great marsh, with its “sense of time…thick and heavy” and its noble cranes, “symbol of our untamable past,” in the form of a “Marshland Elegy. “ It was a sad song of past, present, and future loss. After tracking the effects of intensifying, machine-driven human land uses on the marsh, from first set...
Chapter
For Leopold, by the late 1930s it had become a regular drumbeat: Conservation was not chiefly about restoring and protecting land. It was about improving people and transforming culture, rebuilding values from the ground up. It was about making “a new kind of people,” as he said in his letter to former student Douglas Wade; it was about “rebuilding...
Article
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Conference Paper
A prose poem featuring the song of the extinct huia.
Article
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Keywords: city, climate change, nature, urban ethic, ambiguity
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People of the twenty-first century urgently require new ways of envisioning Earth and humanity’s uncertainly unfolding future in order to live in ways that do not further exacerbate the environmental crisis. The fragmented environmental community is responsible for pulling together to help do so. Mature hope requires the cooperation of all the acad...
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Human demands on nature have increased due to our burgeoning population. The applications of scientific knowledge to the development of increasingly powerful technologies and consumptive lifestyles by more and more people have created a modern category of human-caused disaster-stealth disasters. Stealth disasters-such as agriculturally-induced soil...
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Land is necessary for human flourishing, and its use remains a compelling concern for every society, even those wherein industrialization has sharply diminished people's awareness of land. Here, we consider land's influence on political thinking, particularly thinking about democratic governance, and ask if this influence might be made more benefic...
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A household icon of the environmental movement, Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) may be the most quoted conservationist in history. A Sand County Almanac has sold millions of copies and Leopold's writings are venerated for their perceptions about land and how people might live in concert with the whole community of life. But who is the man behind the words...
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Civil societies are related in complex ways with the nature that surrounds them. Drawing upon ecological principles, social, economic, and political theories, and empirical evidence from environmental psychology, we explore the ongoing dialectic between nature and culture—how humans alter nature and nature alters humans, their cultures and associat...
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Broadly conceived and considered in its many usages, sustainability has grave defects as a planning goal, particularly when used by conservationists: it confuses means and ends; it is vague about what is being sustained and who or what is doing the sustaining; it is uninspiring; it is little more than Pinchot-era conservation (and thus ignores the...
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Science and policy are both relevant to managing land. How they fit together is best understood by viewing land management as a process and by beginning the inquiry from and with that process, drawing distinctions between issues of substance and process and between the functions of describing nature and evaluating it normatively. This process- base...

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Projects (4)
Project
re/generativity