Julian Quandt

Julian Quandt
Radboud University | RU · Behavioural Science Institute

Master of Science

About

11
Publications
2,284
Reads
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64
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - September 2022
Radboud University
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2015 - June 2017
Radboud University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Statistics 1 (1st year Bachelor-course) Statistics 2 (2nd year Bachelor-course) Psychometrics and Decision-Theory (2nd year Bachelor-course)

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Inhibitory-control training can change food consumption. Here, we review work on one specific inhibitory-control training, namely go/no-go training (GNG), with the aim of clarifying how this training changes behavior. Recent work suggests it is unlikely that GNG trains general inhibitory control or even food-specific inhibition. Instead, recent res...
Article
Full-text available
Consistently not responding to stimuli during go/no-go training leads to lower evaluations of these NoGo stimuli. How this NoGo-devaluation-effect can be explained has remained unclear. Here, we ran three experiments to test the hypothesis that people form stimulus-stop-associations during the training, which predict the strength of the devaluation...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluations and value-based decisions are often accompanied by a feeling of confidence about whether or not the evaluation or decision is accurate. We argue that this feeling of confidence reflects the variation of an underlying value distribution and that this value distribution represents previously experienced values related to an object. Two pr...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how sustainable preference change can be achieved is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work shows that merely responding or not responding to objects during go/no-go training can influence preferences for these objects right after the training, when people choose with a time limit. Here we examined whether and how su...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how sustainable preference change can be achieved is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work shows that merely responding or not responding to objects can change people’s preferences for these objects for at least one week. However, it is unclear whether such lasting preference change is caused directly by the mere (n...
Article
Full-text available
A recent p-curve analysis on effects of so-called inhibitory control training on eating behavior and food choice revealed the evidential value of this kind of training based on published studies was inconclusive. Based on this finding, it was recommended that higher-powered, preregistered, experiments should be conducted in order to better assess t...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluations of stimuli can be changed by simple motor responses such that stimuli to which responses are consistently withheld tend to be evaluated less positively than other stimuli. The exact mechanism that underlies this no-go devaluation effect is still unknown. Here we examine whether attention to the stimuli during training contributes to the...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the formation and modification of preferences is important for explaining human behavior across many domains. Here we examined when and how preferences for food items can be changed by linking mere action versus inaction to these items. In 7 preregistered experiments, participants were trained to consistently respond to certain food i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the formation and modification of preferences is important for explaining human behavior across many domains. Here we examined when and how preferences for food items can be changed by linking mere action versus inaction to these items. In 7 preregistered experiments, participants were trained to consistently respond to certain food i...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Consistently not responding to stimuli during go/no-go training leads to lower evaluations of these no-go stimuli compare to both go and untrained stimuli (i.e., stimuli that were not used during the training). How this no-go devaluation effect can be explained has remained unclear, however. Here, we ran three experiments to test the hypothesis that people form stimulus-stop associations during the training, which predict the strength of the no-go devaluation effect.
Project
Consistently not responding to stimuli during go/no-go training leads to lower evaluations of these no-go stimuli than that of both go and untrained stimuli. How this no-go devaluation effect can be explained has remained unclear, however. Here, we ran two experiments to examine two competing underlying learning mechanisms: associative learning and inferential learning (aka., propositional learning).
Project
In this project, we aim to examine whether we can amplify the effect of Go/no-go training on food choice by incorporating reinforcement learning principles. Specifically, we will ask participants to perform a reinforcement learning food Go/no-go task where four training conditions will be included: Go to obtain reward (i.e., 'GoToWin' condition), Go to avoid punishment (i.e., 'GoToAvoid' condition), NoGo to obtain reward (i.e., 'NoGoToWin' condition), and NoGo to avoid punishment (i.e., 'NoGoToAvoid' condition). Next, we will ask participants to make binary food choices between all combinations of these aforementioned training conditions (e.g., 'GoToWin vs. NoGoToAovid').