Julian Limberg

Julian Limberg
King's College London | KCL · Department of Political Economy

PhD

About

14
Publications
2,724
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121
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Does growing state activity inevitably lead to more complex policy systems? In this article, we offer a new, comprehensive approach that systematically differentiates between the size and the complexity of policy portfolios to answer this question. Looking at data from 21 OECD countries over more than three decades (1980-2015) in the areas of socia...
Article
How can states expand their fiscal capacity in the 21st century? I examine this question by looking at one of the most powerful contemporary fiscal tools at hand – the Value-Added Tax (VAT). Using a novel dataset on VAT rates worldwide since 2000, I argue that fiscal problem pressure can lead to an expanded usage of the VAT. However, this effect de...
Chapter
The chapter analyses the spread of general consumption taxes. It makes two points. First, it shows that the initial introduction of a general consumption tax has boosted revenue-raising capacity in countries around the world. Typically, the first general consumption tax was not a VAT but a less technically sophisticated general sales tax. Second, t...
Article
Full-text available
The last 50 years has seen a dramatic decline in taxes on the rich across the advanced democracies. There is still fervent debate in both political and academic circles, however, about the economic consequences of this sweeping change in tax policy. This article contributes to this debate by utilizing a newly constructed indicator of taxes on the r...
Article
Which factors have driven wealth taxation over the long run of history? We look at a new dataset on the first permanent introduction of taxes on net wealth, i.e., recurrent taxes levied based on the absolute value of an individual’s financial assets, to answer this question. First, we place the introduction of wealth taxation in the historical gene...
Article
What drives taxes on the rich? In this article, we claim that the existing empirical literature on taxing the rich suffers from two key shortcomings: 1) It pays too little attention to the major structural and technological changes that have taken place in advanced capitalist economies since the 1970s; and 2) it lacks consensus on how to measure ta...
Preprint
Why do (some) ordinary citizens support tax cuts for the rich? A prominent explanation in the political economy literature stresses the role of unenlightened self-interest. According to this view, citizens consistently fail to gauge whether they are directly affected by tax policy reforms. We use a randomized survey experiment in the US to identify...
Article
Full-text available
At the 26th Climate Change Conference of the Parties, scheduled for November 2021, negotiators will finally decide on the future of international carbon markets under the Paris Agreement. While several issues still need to be solved, this ‘policy impact forum’ article seeks to raise awareness of an important challenge that must be dealt with at the...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the new Tax Introduction Dataset (TID). Listing the year and the mode of the first permanent introduction of six major taxes (inheritance tax, personal income tax, corporate income tax, social security contributions, general sales tax and value added tax) in 220 countries, 1750–2018, TID is the most comprehensive dataset of i...
Article
Full-text available
Do more rules improve overall policy performance? To answer this question, we look at rule growth in the area of environmental policy from an aggregate perspective. We argue that impactful growth in rules crucially depends on implementation capacities. If such capacities are limited, countries are at risk of 'empty' rule growth where they lack the...
Article
Have banking crises boosted path-breaking fiscal innovations? Drawing on the literature that deals with the impact of warfare on fiscal capacity, I argue that banking crises have facilitated the rise of progressive tax instruments by causing revenue needs and demands for fiscal fairness. I test this argument by means of event history analyses and n...
Article
Full-text available
Has the financial crisis influenced taxes on the rich? In this article, I argue that crisis countries have raised income tax progressivity because of fiscal fairness considerations. I test this claim by analysing a new data set on top marginal personal income tax (PIT) rates for 122 countries from 2006 to 2014, applying matching methods and a diffe...
Article
Progressive taxation is an effective redistributive tool in times of growing inequality. However, like all public policies, an increase in tax progressivity is unlikely if it lacks popular demand. Has the financial crisis affected the demand for progressive taxation? Building on research that has identified fairness beliefs as the main factor pushi...

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