Julia S. Soares

Julia S. Soares
Mississippi State University | MSU · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

9
Publications
3,847
Reads
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89
Citations
Introduction
Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Cognitive Science area at Mississippi State University. I do research exploring the mechanisms of memory and forgetting in everyday settings. I am particularly interested in memory interactions with digital technology, especially digital cameras and social media.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
Mississippi State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 2014 - June 2020
University of California, Santa Cruz
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
August 2010 - May 2014
Binghamton University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
A photo-taking-impairment effect has been observed such that participants are less likely to remember objects they photograph than objects they only observe. According to the offloading hypothesis, taking photos allows people to offload organic memory onto the camera's prosthetic memory, which they can rely upon to "remember" for them. We tested th...
Chapter
Full-text available
Digital technologies have changed the everyday use of human memory. When information is saved or made readily available online, there is less need to encode or maintain access to that information within the biological structures of memory. People increasingly depend on the Internet and various digital devices to learn and remember, but the implicat...
Article
People often report taking photos to aid memory. Two mixed-method surveys were used to investigate participants' reasons for taking photos, focusing specifically on memory-related reasons, which were split into two sub-types: photos taken as mementos, and photos taken as a means of offloading information. Participants reported their motivations for...
Article
The photo-taking-impairment effect is observed when photographed information is less likely to be remembered than nonphotographed information. Three experiments examined whether this effect persists when multiple photos are taken. Experiment 1 used a within-subjects laboratory-based design in which participants viewed images of paintings and were i...
Article
Full-text available
The retrieval of a subset of items can cause the forgetting of other, non-retrieved items, a phenomenon known as retrieval-induced forgetting. Initial work suggested that giving people the opportunity to restudy non-retrieved items following retrieval practice is sufficient to eliminate the effect of retrieval-induced forgetting, but more recent wo...
Article
Fidget‐spinners have experienced a rapid rise in popularity, at least partially because they are marketed as attentional aides with the potential to enhance student learning. In the current study, college‐aged students watched educational videos while either using a fidget‐spinner or not. Using a fidget‐spinner was associated with increased reports...
Article
Retrieval-induced forgetting is observed when the retrieval of target information causes the forgetting of nontarget information. The present study investigated whether similar dynamics occur in the context of generating arguments in the process of explanation. Participants studied arguments associated with several issues before attempting to think...
Article
Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the observation that retrieval of target information causes forgetting of related nontarget information. A number of accounts of this phenomenon have been proposed, including a context-shift-based account (Jonker, Seli, & Macleod, 2013). This account proposes that RIF occurs as a result of the context shift fro...
Article
Full-text available
In two lick suppression experiments with rats, we assessed interference with behavior indicative of conditioned inhibition by a latent inhibition treatment as a function of test context. We asked what effect the test context has, given identical latent inhibition treatments in Phase 1 and identical conditioned inhibition trainings in Phase 2. In Ex...

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