Júlia Chaumel

Júlia Chaumel
Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces | MPIKG · Department of Biomaterials

Doctor of Philosophy

About

4
Publications
766
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19
Citations
Introduction
Júlia Chaumel currently works at Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany. Júlia does research in Structural Biology, Marine Biology and Evolutionary Biology.

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Tessellated cartilage is a distinctive composite tissue forming the bulk of the skeleton of cartilaginous fishes (e.g. sharks and rays), built from unmineralized cartilage covered at the surface by a thin layer of mineralized tiles called tesserae. The finescale structure and composition of elasmobranch tessellated cartilage has largely been invest...
Article
Full-text available
An accepted uniting character of modern cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays, chimaera) is the presence of a mineralized, skeletal crust, tiled by numerous minute plates called tesserae. Tesserae have, however, never been demonstrated in modern chimaera and it is debated whether the skeleton mineralizes at all. We show for the first time that tessell...
Article
Full-text available
A prerequisite for many analysis tasks in modern comparative biology is the segmentation of 3-dimensional (3D) images of the specimens being investigated (e.g. from microCT data). Depending on the specific imaging technique that was used to acquire the images and on the image resolution, different segmentation tools are required. While some standar...
Article
In most vertebrates the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton is replaced by bone during development. During this process, cartilage cells (chondrocytes) mineralize the extracellular matrix and undergo apoptosis, giving way to bone cells (osteocytes). In contrast, sharks and rays (elasmobranchs) have cartilaginous skeletons throughout life, where only t...

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