Julia Bear

Julia Bear
Stony Brook University | Stony Brook · College of Business

About

35
Publications
55,864
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768
Citations

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Gender differences in negotiation are typically explained by processes that concern women (e.g., women anticipate backlash for assertive behavior). Research has begun to suggest that processes that concern men (e.g., men want to be seen as “real” men) also help to explain gender differences. However, these 2 approaches typically remain disconnected...
Article
Gender gaps in pay and career advancement increase as people take on greater caregiving responsibilities, with large gaps persistent in high-level, time-intensive positions. Given extant research concerning gender roles, and job demands and resources, I hypothesized that temporal flexibility, in particular control over work hours, would positively...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a conceptual framework for expanding the scope of future research on the role of gender in career negotiations. Extant research on gender in career negotiations emphasizes women’s disadvantages relative to men in compensation negotiations. We present an inductive study of what and how women negotiate for career advancement and the attain...
Article
We focus on how interpersonal characteristics should influence leader support for gender equity in organizations. Recognizing gender disparities in organizations and the “labyrinth” that women face when they advance in their careers (cf. Eagly & Carli, 2007), we develop a model for how interpersonal characteristics of leaders, both men and women, i...
Article
The caregiving ambition framework offers a new approach to understanding work-life issues in terms of aspirations to nurture and care for others. I propose that caregiving ambition varies along two dimensions: (1) the aspiration to be the direct provider of care, which entails a physical presence in order to meet needs personally, and (2) the aspir...
Article
We propose that performance feedback can be a power retention mechanism that puts women at a relative disadvantage and contributes to the lack of women in leadership positions. Feedback is an evaluative process, with the (typically higher-power) source often having considerable discretion and means to deliver feedback and the feedback recipient oft...
Article
According to gender role congruity theory, women, compared to men, underperform in masculine negotiations because these negotiations are incongruent with women’s gender role. Based on this framework, we developed two gender-relevant primes—a masculine-supplement prime and a feminine-complement prime—that address role incongruity and should improve...
Article
Two studies examine whether the workplace motherhood penalty and fatherhood bonus are better conceived, respectively, as a caregiver penalty and breadwinner bonus. Participants acting as employers structured offers for married female or male job candidates with children. In Study 1, participants assumed “mother = caregiver” and “father = breadwinne...
Article
Full-text available
A comprehensive survey conducted in 2008 found that only 13 % of Wikipedia contributors are women. We proposed that masculine norms for behavior in Wikipedia, which may be further exacerbated by the disinhibiting nature of an online, anonymous environment, lead to different psychological experiences for women and men, which, in turn, explain gender...
Article
Full-text available
Attachment theory has received scant consideration in the negotiation literature. We examined the effects of attachment anxiety and avoidance on negotiation propensity and performance in two studies. In terms of negotiation propensity (Study 1), attachment anxiety had significant, deleterious effects, though contrary to our predictions, attachment...
Article
Despite extensive research on gender and negotiation outcomes, the role of gender identity is less well understood. Across three behavioral studies, we demonstrate that gender identity plays an important role in women’s decisions about negotiation, and that gender identity relevant priming improves women’s performance in competitive negotiations. W...
Article
Conflict research has shown that managing relationship conflict via avoidance is beneficial for team performance, but it is unclear whether avoidant conflict management benefits individuals on an affective level. Drawing on theories of gender roles, we proposed that gender is an important factor that influences whether avoidant conflict management...
Article
Attachment theory has received scant consideration in the negotiation literature. We examined the effects of attachment anxiety and avoidance on negotiation propensity and performance in two studies. In terms of negotiation propensity (Study 1), attachment anxiety had significant, deleterious effects, though contrary to our predictions, attachment...
Article
We examine whether variations in men and women’s attributions of power to their negotiation counterpart underlie gender differences in negotiation outcomes. In four studies, we demonstrate that women attribute greater power to their counterpart compared to men, and that this difference accounts for men’s greater propensity to negotiate compared to...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have assumed that the presence of negative emotions during task conflict implies the absence of positive emotions. However, emotions researchers have shown that positive and negative emotions are not 2 ends of a bipolar continuum; rather, they represent 2 separate, orthogonal dimensions. Drawing on affective events theory, we develop and t...
Data
We tested the effects of team strategic orientation on team member perceptions, work strategy and information search. In Experiment 1, 80 teams worked on a hidden profile decision-making task. A defensive team strategic orientation increased members' perceptions of the problem's scope, leading to a more process-focused work strategy and broader inf...
Article
This chapter describes the domain organization of social relationships, how it emerges over development, and the implications of disorganization of domain structure for personality disorders. We describe a model of the organization of the developing personality in childhood and illustrate how deficits in this organization may contribute to adult pe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A recent survey of contributors to Wikipedia found that less than 15% of contributors are women. This gender contribution gap has received significant attention from both researchers and the media. A panel of researchers and practitioners has offered several insights and opinions as to why a gender gap exists in contributions despite gender anonymi...
Article
Full-text available
Given that women continue to be underrepresented in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and that scientific innovations are increasingly produced by team collaborations, we reviewed the existing literature regarding the effects of gender diversity on team processes and performance. Recent evidence strongly suggests that team collaborat...
Article
Abstract Avoidance of negotiation is rarely investigated, and the implicit assumption guiding much of the current negotiation research is that engagement is inevitable. In addition, compensation is typically examined, although topics related to both employment and family life are also negotiated in organizations. Two experimental studies tested hyp...
Article
In two experiments, we test the effects of team strategic orientation on team member perceptions and information search. In both studies, defensive team strategic orientation increases members’ perceptions of oppositional strength and problem scope, leading to a more process-focused work strategy and greater information search. When teams need crit...

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