Julia Baumann

Julia Baumann
Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz | KFU Graz · Institute of Biology

Dr.rer.nat.

About

37
Publications
6,048
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257
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Biology, Department of Biodiversity and Evolution, at the University of Graz. In my research, I apply morphometric methods to answer evolutionary questions in different mite taxa and study non-parasitic relationships between mites and other animals.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - March 2020
University of Freiburg
Position
  • Professor
October 2012 - October 2017
Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Information about larva and nymphal stages as well as additional descriptions of adults of four littoral species of the families Fortuyniidae, Selenoribatidae and Podacaridae found around the coast of South Africa are provided. Juveniles of Fortuynia elamellata micromorpha are well in accordance with the morphology of other known juveniles of Fortu...
Article
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A molecular genetic and morphometric investigation revealed the supposedly widespread Caribbean and Western Atlantic intertidal oribatid mite species Fortuynia atlantica to comprise at least two different species. Although there are no distinct morphological differences separating these taxa, COI and 18S sequence divergence data, as well as differe...
Article
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The South African coast is known to harbor four different species of intertidal oribatid mites and their distribution strongly correlates with marine ecoregions. Relatively little is known about the dispersal of these organisms and how populations of different locations are connected. To test dispersal abilities and connectivity of these South Afri...
Article
Coevolution is often considered a major driver of speciation, but evidence for this claim is not always found because diversity might be cryptic. When morphological divergence is low, molecular data are needed to uncover diversity. This is often the case in mites, which are known for their extensive and often cryptic diversity. We studied mites of...
Article
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There has been a long controversy about what defines a species and how to delimitate them which resulted in the existence of more than two dozen different species concepts. Recent research on so-called "cryptic species" heated up this debate as some scientists argue that these cryptic species are only a result of incompatible species concepts. Whil...
Article
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A faunistic study of the intertidal oribatid mite fauna of South Africa’s coastline revealed the presence of four species from three families, showing specific biogeographic patterns. Their occurrences show a clear east–west divide, with a small gap near East London between the Podacaridae and the other two families, the Selenoribatidae and Fortuyn...
Preprint
Full-text available
Coevolution is often considered a major driver of speciation, but evidence for this claim is not always found because diversity might be cryptic. When morphological divergence is low, molecular data are needed to uncover diversity. A taxon for which this holds true are the mites, which are known for their extensive and often cryptic diversity. We s...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to disperse is one of the most important factors influencing the biogeography of species and speciation processes. Highly mobile species have been shown to lack geographic population structures, whereas less mobile species show genetically strongly subdivided populations which are expected to also display at least subtle phenotypic diff...
Article
The phytoseiid mites of the Cape Verde archipelago are scarcely known. We report the results of a survey conducted on the islands of Santiago and Santo Antão, where phytoseiids were collected from native, cultivated and invasive plants. Fourteen species were collected, four of which represent new records for the islands. One new species, Typhlodrom...
Article
Three new phytoseiid species of the subfamily Amblyseiinae, Neoseiulus laetus sp. nov., N. uncinatus sp. nov. and Chelaseius longicervix sp. nov., and the male of Neoseiulus madeirensis Papadoulis & Kapaxidi, are described from the Madeira archipelago. Moreover, six Amblyseiinae species are also reported for the first time from the islands and addi...
Article
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The definition, as well as the existence of cryptic species, is still a subject of controversial debates. Some scientists claim that cryptic diversity is a real phenomenon that should be extensively studied while others argue that cryptic species do not exist as they are nothing more than an incompatibility of species concepts.We investigated the e...
Article
Two new intertidal oribatid mite species from the Indo-pacific region are described. Indopacifica iohanna sp. n. was found on the coasts of the Philippines and can be distinguished from its congeners by the lack of a ventral tooth on the claws. The larva and nymphs of this species show the same type of plication and setation typical for juveniles o...
Article
New phytoseiid mites from Mauritius Islands are being reported, including the description of two new species, Transeius pungi sp. nov. and Typhlodromus (Anthoseius) recurvitremus sp. nov., the description of the male of Phytoseius haroldi Ueckermann & Kreiter, and the redescriptions of two Amblyseius species only known from the type specimens, A. n...
Article
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The fifth insect camp of the Entomological Society of Austria (ESA) was conducted from April 27 to May 2, 2018. Many of the 39 participants were recognized experts on different arthropod groups. Fifty-seven localities within and nearby the Donau-Auen National Park were investigated, and a total of 1265 invertebrate species identified: 8 Collembola,...
Article
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A new species of Scutacaridae (Acari: Heterostigmatina: Pygmephoroidea) associated with Reticulitermes banyulensis Clément, 1978 termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) is described from Spain. By rearing the mites in laboratory cultures, all life stages (larva, female and male) of Imparipes clementis Baumann sp. nov. were available for descriptions,...
Article
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The present study highlights the distribution, systematics, morphology, genetics, and ecology of two newly discovered intertidal oribatid mites from the Western Caribbean. The fortuyniid Litoribates floridae sp. nov. represents a cryptic species as it looks nearly identical to L. bonairensis. The two species can be distinguished only by subtle morp...
Article
Full-text available
Mites of the family Scutacaridae have been found in termite nests and also phoretic on termites. In contrast to what has been reported until now for scutacarid mites, the respective species did not possess claws on leg I for attachment on their host, but clasped to the termites' coxae probably by using their large, pad-like empodia on legs II and I...
Article
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The members of the family Scutacaridae (Acari, Heterostigmatina, Pygmephoroidea) are soil-living, fungivorous mites, and some of them are known to be associated with other animals. After reviewing the mites’ behavioural and morphological adaptations to their animal-associated lifestyle, the present publication shows the result of a thorough literat...
Article
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Knowledge about the fauna of scutacarid mites (Heterostigmatina, Pygmephoroidea, Scutacaridae) on the Iberian Peninsula is very scarce. In order to increase information on Iberian scutacarids, collections were performed in the south of Andalusia, resulting in one new species Scutacarus tarifae sp. nov. and four new records for the Iberian Peninsula...
Article
Full-text available
Two new intertidal oribatid mite species were found on the coast of Bonaire. Litoribates bonairensis sp. nov.can be distinguished from its only congener, L. caelestis, by the cerotegumental pattern and shape of sensillus. This is also the first record of the genus from the Caribbean region. Thasecazetes falcidactylus gen. nov., sp. nov. is characte...
Article
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The intertidal oribatid mite species Alismobates galapagoensis and Litoribates caelestis occur on the archipelago of Galápagos. To test for morphological variation between populations of different islands, a comprehensive morphometric study was performed. Four A. galapagoensis populations from the islands Bartolomé, Isabela, Santa Cruz and San Cris...
Article
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Based on males gained from laboratory cultures, nine new descriptions and one redescription of scutacarid males are given: the respective species are Heterodispus foveatus Jagersbacher-Baumann and Ebermann 2012, Imparipes dispar Rack, 1964, Lamnacarus ornatus Balogh and Mahunka, 1963, Scutacarus acarorum (Goeze, 1780), S. deserticolus Mahunka, 1969...
Article
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Imparipes (Sporichneuthes) dispar Rack, 1964 is a species belonging to the mite family Scutacaridae which displays appetence behavior and a unique jumping ability. Both features indicate that I. dispar might disperse via phoresy, but possible hosts were not known until now. A field experiment was conducted to determine whether I. dispar performs ph...
Article
Fortuynia hawaiiensis n. sp. represents a new species occurring on the archipelago of Hawaii. The complete absence of males from all Hawaiian samples points to thelytokous parthenogenetic reproduction in this species. This reproductive mode may have evolved in F. hawaiiensis n. sp. because it reduces costs of producing males, mate finding and sperm...
Article
Full-text available
As the holotype slide of Imparipes (Imparipes) americanus (Banks, 1904) was found to contain an additional, previously unnoticed specimen of the same species, I. americanus is redescribed here on the basis of the holotype and the new paratype. In contrast to other scutacarid species associated with wild bees, I. americanus probably does not use the...
Article
The mite Scutacarus acarorum (Scutacaridae, Heterostigmatina) is one of the dominant bumblebee inquilines in the Holarctic. The wide distribution and the host generalist behaviour of S. acarorum suggest that it could be a group of multiple cryptic species. European S. acarorum populations and a small population from New York were studied using trad...
Article
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The small archipelago of Bermuda is a geologically young landmass in the Western Atlantic Ocean and recently turned out to be inhabited by a number of intertidal oribatid mites. One newly described species, Carinozetes bermudensis, showed an unusual vast range of habitats like sandy beaches, rocky substrate and mangroves. In the present study, 13 B...
Article
The genera of the mite family Scutacaridae (Heterostigmatina) can be easily distinguished by certain qualitative traits, whereas the species of these genera are lacking conspicuous distinctive features and thus, species descriptions are often based on quantitative characters. However, the intraspecific variability of these traits can be pronounced...
Article
We provide the first description of the mite species Imparipes (Imparipes) burgeri n. sp. (Scutacaridae, Heterostigmatina). The species is recorded from localities in Austria, Belgium, Germany, Poland and Slovakia. A total of 759 females have been found phoretic upon 45 host species belonging to ground-nesting or parasitc on ground-nesting hosts ap...
Article
Scutacarid mites (Scutacaridae, Heterostigmatina) are oviparous and show a shortened developmental cycle, the larva being the only existing juvenile stage. Eggs inside of gravid females and freshly laid eggs generally show early stages of development and thus contain no differentiated embryo. However, findings of eggs already undergoing embryogenes...
Article
The description of a new Egyptian soil inhabiting scutacarid species, Heterodispus cordidiscus n. sp. (Acari, Heterostigmatina), including female, male and larva, is given. It is the first description of male and larva within the genus Heterodispus Paoli, 1911. The redescription of the nominal species H. elongatus Trägårdh, 1905 by Paoli (1911) has...
Article
A new species of soil living scutacarid mite Heterodispus foveatus n. sp. is described. Additional attention is given to describe the morphology and ecology of its unique (for heterostigmatic mites) sporothecae. H. foveatus n. sp. is distributed from the riparian zone of the Egyptian Nile to South Africa. It is found phoretically on a variety of ho...
Article
Full-text available
Mites of the soil inhabiting family Scutacaridae (Heterostigmatina) are distributed throughout the world, but only rarely found in high densities. Larvae and males are extremely difficult to detect and identify in soil samples. Laboratory cultures are necessary to describe these life stages, detect female dimorphism, or carry out other kinds of bio...
Article
Full-text available
In the mite family Scutacaridae, several species belonging to different genera show thanatosis or 'playing dead' behaviour. Some of them possess morphological features that are obviously connected with this behaviour. We compared the morphological adaptations to thanatosis in females of Lamnacarus ornatus Balogh and Mahunka, 1963 to those in Pygmod...

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
The aim of the project (performed through my doctoral study) was to assess the suitability of different traditional and geometric morphometric methods for the mite family Scutacaridae. Morphometric means were used to analyse differences between populations, between mites collected from the field and mites from laboratory cultures as well as between different species.
Project
I investigate the biology, biogeography, ecology and evolution of intertidal oribatid mites. Presently, I focus on the bio- and phylogeography of Caribbean intertidal mites.