Juergen Pollerspoeck

Juergen Pollerspoeck
Zoologische Staatssammlung München · Ichthyological department

Master of Fiscal Affairs
www.shark-references.com, www.elasmo-key.org, www.molasse-haie-rochen.de

About

50
Publications
66,322
Reads
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147
Citations
Introduction
- Editor and founder of www.shark-references.com, www.molasse-haie-rochen.de and www.elasmo-key.org - Independent researcher - Authorised CITES expert for sharks, rays and skates (Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety - BMU-) - Volunteer of the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology - Member "Paläontologische Gesellschaft e.V." - Member "Freunde der Bayerischen Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Historische Geologie, München e.V." - Member "Deutsche Elasmobranchier Gesellschaft (D.E.G.) e.V." - Member "Gesellschaft für Ichthyologie (GFI)"

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
Full-text available
Diet is a crucial trait of an animal’s lifestyle and ecology. The trophic level of an organism indicates its functional position within an ecosystem and holds significance for its ecology and evolution. Here, we demonstrate the use of zinc isotopes (δ66Zn) to geochemically assess the trophic level in diverse extant and extinct sharks, including the...
Article
Full-text available
The newly collected shark and ray tooth fossils from the marine sediments of the Upper Marine Molasse close to Allerding (4.8 km SE of Schärding, Austria) allow for a review of the hitherto known diversity comprising a taxonomic update and the documentation of additional taxa. Besides ten taxa already known from the area, the following taxa were co...
Article
In this study we describe a new kitefin shark (Dalatiidae) genus and species Dracipinna bracheri gen. et sp. nov. based on upper Oligocene and lower Miocene tooth fossils. The teeth were excavated at three different sites which all lie in transgression phases. The fossil shark teeth are diverse and, depending on the excavation site, indicate pelagi...
Article
The sandpit near Rengetsweiler (Baden-Württemberg, SW Germany) is a famous locality for fossil shark and ray teeth from the Upper Marine Molasse (Lower Miocene). A total of 21 shark and ray genera were recovered from these sediments (Aetobatus, Alopias, Araloselachus, Carcharhinus, Carcharias, Carcharodon, Centrophorus, ?Dasyatis, Galeocerdo, Hemip...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The driving forces and the impact on diversity patterns of mass-extinction events are one of the key-questions in palaeontology. Although the K/Pg extinction event is not considered as the most severe, this last extinction has enormously influenced the evolution leading to the modern biota. Despite numerous studies dealing with the most prominent a...
Article
Sibert and Rubin (Reports, 4 June 2021, p. 1105) claim to have identified a previously unidentified, major extinction event of open-ocean sharks in the early Miocene. We argue that their interpretations are based on an experimental design that does not account for a considerable rise in the sedimentation rate coinciding with the proposed event, nor...
Article
Full-text available
The distinct morphology of teeth of the dogfish sharks Squalus spp. allows for tracking its evolutionary history. Fossils of the genus are known since the early Cretaceous; however, fossilized teeth of Squalus from that period are scarce. Here, we report on the oldest finding of a Squalus tooth fossil (upper Campanian-lower Maastrichtian) from the...
Article
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The article describes two ancient shark specimens of Lamna nasus from Pfreimd (Bavaria, Germany).
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Auch nach mehreren Jahrzehnten der Erforschung wartet die egerische Transgressionsabfolge von Unterrudling bei Eferding (Oberösterreich), welche den Übergang der Flachwasserablagerungen der Linz-Melk Formation zu den Tiefwassersedimenten der Eferding Formation (EF) umfasst, noch mit Überraschungen auf. So war kurzzeitig eine Schicht in der siltig-t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The sediments of the vicinity of St. Pankraz near Salzburg are well-known for its extraordinary fossil richness. The most popular outcrop comprises sediments from the Eocene, yielding a diverse fossil content of invertebrates as well as scarce vertebrates. Among the vertebrates are remains of turtles, crocodiles, terrestrial-and marine mammals, and...
Article
Repeated bulk sampling for over a decade in an indurated glauconitic sandy marl horizon at St. Pankraz Salzburg, Austria, has yielded a diverse assemblage of 37 elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) from the early middle Eocene (Lutetian). This elasmobranch fauna is dominated by epipelagic and mesopelagic taxa known today to preferentially inhabit the mi...
Article
Full-text available
The North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) comprises one of the most complete sedimentary records of the Oligocene and Miocene. Driven by global sea-level fluctuations, vast sedimentary influx and tectonic movement. The locality of Unterrudling near Eferding (Upper Austria) exposes the largest succession of sedimentary deposits from the late Oligocene...
Article
A three‐ton shipment of dry shark fins was examined by German customs in 2017 leading to the confiscation of 405 kg of potential CITES species. We analyzed a subsample of this material (115 specimens) using DNA sequence‐based identification and compared results to morphological screening of CITES species. We found a mixture of CITES regulated (4 of...
Book
Full-text available
The table and provided download links below are intended for informational use in Chondrichthyan research. The allocation aims for faciliating to find species numbers and most recent information on taxonomic changes. We will regularly update the table and download links at lest twice annually. The updates will be announced on facebook (https://www....
Article
Full-text available
Apart from wet-collection specimens, shark and ray (Neoselachii) museum collection specimens are often represented as articulated jaws or single teeth. In many cases, detailed information on locality, species identification and data on the specimen's body are lacking. The identification key for jaws and teeth presented herein is part B of a planned...
Article
Full-text available
An important character on several taxonomic levels for shark identification is the tooth morphology. Sharks show a variety of highly specialized dentitions reflecting adaptations to their feeding habits. Intraspecific variation of tooth morphology such as sexual or ontogenetic dimorphism is poorly known in many species, even though tooth morphology...
Article
Full-text available
Deep-neritic sediments of the Eferding Formation (Egerian, Upper Oligocene) of Upper Austria from the Kamig kaolinite quarry revealed minute teeth of the putatively planktivorous shark genus Nanocetorhinus. This is the oldest unambiguous record of this rarely documented genus, which was known so far only from Miocene deposits of Europe, North Ameri...
Article
In the fossil record, sawsharks (family Pristiophoridae BLEEKER, 1859) include the genera Pristiophorus MÜLLER & HENLE, 1837, Pliotrema REGAN, 1906 and Ikamauius KEYES, 1979, which are mainly or exclusively represented by isolated lateral denticles of their saw-like rostra or less commonly (Pristiophorus) also by tiny oral teeth. We studied a large...
Article
The Early Ottnangian (Early Miocene, Burdigalian) marine deposit of Ursendorf (Baden-Württemberg, South Germany) belongs to the Upper Marine Molasse (UMM) unit in the Northern Alpine Foreland Basin. The outcropping sediments mainly consist of coarse-grained, poorly sorted sands, partly showing large-scale cross-bedding. In these sediments, 24 gener...
Article
Full-text available
Elasmobranch remains are quite common in Miocene deposits and were the subject of numerous studies since the middle of the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, the taxonomic diversity of the Marine Molasse sharks, rays and skates is still largely unknown. Here, we describe 37 taxa from the lower Miocene of the Molasse Basin: 21 taxa could be identifie...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Elasmobranchs (sharks, rays, and skates) have been the predominant predators of the Central Paratethys during its fully marine phases in the Oligocene and Miocene. Whilst middle and upper Miocene strata are frequently outcropping in the Austrian part of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB), upper Oligocene and lower Miocene sediments of the Egeri...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to articulated, mostly formaldehyde-fixed and ethanol-preserved, taxidermy or anatomical specimens, sharks and rays are represented in scientific collections by numerous jaws and isolated teeth. These specimens often source from historical collections where existing informations about species, sex or geographic origin in many cases are...
Article
Fossil tip‐dating allows for the inclusion of morphological data in divergence time estimates based on both extant and extinct taxa. Neoselachii have a cartilaginous skeleton, which is less prone to fossilization compared to skeletons of Osteichthyans. Therefore, the majority of the neoselachian fossil record is comprised of single teeth, which fos...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years Azorean fishermen reported the presence of the smalltooth sand tiger shark, Odontaspis ferox (Risso, 1810), a very rare demersal shark species, associated with insular shelves and slopes, with occasional incursions into shallow waters and of poorly known biology and ecology. There are fourteen new records of this species, between 19...
Article
Fossil upper and lower squaliform shark teeth from the upper Austrian marine Molasse (Paratethys, Upper Egerian, Aquitanian) were collected. For testing the phylogenetic signal of 31 reviewed dental characters of both fossil and extant etmopterids and somniosids, we performed phylogenetic analyses using both parsimony and maximum likelihood approac...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the oldest record of a tooth of the shark genus Oxynotus from Europe. Oxynotus, Miocene, new record, Germany, Europe,
Data
This paper contains a collection of 817 citations (no conference abstracts) on topics related to extant and extinct Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) as well as a list of Chondrichthyan species and hosted parasites newly described in 2017. The list is the result of regular queries in numerous journals, books and online publications. It p...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, a diverse fauna of fossil elasmobranch teeth from the Early Miocene (Middle Burdigalian) is analysed. The fossil diversity strongly resembles extant deep-water shark and ray assemblages. The fossils were collected from the Upper Marine Molasse of the lower Ottnangian in the Neuhofener Beds location, Mitterdorf, Germany. The collectio...
Data
This paper contains a collection of 803 citations (no conference abstracts) on topics related to extant and extinct Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) as well as a list of Chondrichthyan species and hosted parasites newly described in 2016. The list is the result of regular queries in numerous journals, books and online publications. It p...
Data
Full-text available
This paper contains a collection of 786 citations (no conference abstracts) on topics related to extant and extinct Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) as well as a list of Chondrichthyan species and hosted parasites newly described in 2015. The list is the result of regular queries in numerous journals, books and online publications. It p...
Book
Full-text available
This is the second version of the database report “Host-Parasite List” and “Parasite-Host List” of cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali). The two lists result from the analysis of 1,078 research articles reporting on host-parasite relations in diverse species of sharks, rays, and chimaeras. The list contains 6,891 recor...
Article
Full-text available
Keywords: Parasquatina zitteli, Heterodontus sp., Scyliorhinus sp., Orectolobiformes, Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, Maastrichtian
Data
Full-text available
This paper contains a collection of 1099 citations (685 articles and 414 conference abstracts) on topics related to extant and extinct Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) as well as a list of Chondrichthyan species and hosted parasites newly described in 2014. The list is the result of regular queries in numerous journals, books and online...
Article
Full-text available
Parasquatina zitteli nov. sp. (Elasmobranchii: Orectolobiformes) aus dem Maastricht von Oberbayern (Gerhartsreiter Schichten, Siegsdorf) und Bemerkungen zur Verbreitung der Ordnung Orectolobiformes. Zusammenfassung Aus dem Gerhartsreiter Graben bei Siegsdorf wird der erste Nachweis der Gattung Parasquatina dokumentiert und aufgrund der morphologisc...
Book
A single bed of conglomeratic, fossil-rich marls intercalated in siliciclastic Lower Egerian deposits (informally denoted as Thalberg Beds, middle to late Chattian, Late Oligocene) yields a diverse elasmobranch fauna. The conglomeratic bed is exposed in the Thalberg Graben, a few km south of Traunstein, Upper Bavaria. It forms part of the Lower Mar...
Article
Full-text available
A rich assemblage of elasmobranch teeth of Early Miocene age (Ottnangian, Upper Marine Molasse) is described from the Heigelsberger Ditch near Teisendorf (Upper Bavaria, Germany). The fauna includes 13 shark and 4 batoid species, including Centrophorus cf. granulosus, Isistius triangulus, Squalus sp., Pristiophorus suevicus, Squatina sp., Mitsukuri...
Data
Full-text available
This collection is the result of research in numerous journals, books and online publications. It contains 721 citations of papers about living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali) and a list of 2013 new described species and parasites of elasmobranchs.
Data
Full-text available
This collection is the result of research in numerous journals, books and online publications. It contains 837 citations of papers about living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali), a list of 2012 new described species and parasites of elasmobranchs. Pollerspöck, J. (2013), Bibliography database of living/f...
Data
Full-text available
This collection is the result of research in numerous journals, books and online publications. It contains more than 700 citations of papers about living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali) and a list of 2011 new described species.
Data
Full-text available
This collection is the result of research in numerous journals, books and online publications. It contains more than 500 citations of papers about living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali).
Book
Full-text available
This is the first version of an “Host - Parasites List” of cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali). This first edition records more than 1.500 different species of parasites recovered from more than 400 species of sharks, rays, skates and chimaeras. All information about the parasites are also available at http://shark-ref...
Data
Full-text available
This collection is the result of research in numerous journals, books and online publications. It contains more than 350 citations of papers about living/fossil sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichtyes: Elasmobranchii, Holocephali).

Questions

Questions (18)
Question
Just got this image from Jim Greenfield of a Rhynchobatus (posterior margin of pectoral fin well seperated from anterior margin of pelvic fin, large dorsal fins, caudal fin with long lobe, snouth pointed). The photo was taken in Reethi Beach, Maldives last month. Its length was 2.5 to 3 m.
I think it is an adult Rhynchobatus djiddensis, because the large black pectoral marking is missing.
Any other ideas?
Question
I got this two images of a Eagle Ray for photo ID. The person who sent me this images gave me the following information: off Marve, Malad-Mumbai, size is around 20-22 inches, in a fisherman's net, tail cut-off, he assumed it could be a species of Aetomylaeus.
I think it is Aetobatus flagellum (BLOCH & SCHNEIDER, 1801) because
-the pectoral fin is seperate from the rostral lobe,
-the pectoral fin joining the head at level of the eye
-the snouth with a single convex rostral lobe
-broad and short disc
-dorsal surface brownish to greenish without any markings
-large spiracles
What is your opinion?
Question
I got this image of a shark for ID. Place of catch is Andaman, India. The image was labeled with Hemitriakis sp.
I think it could be Mustelus mosis HEMPRICH & EHRENBERG, 1899. Is this correct?
Diagnosis after Compagno, 1984: Body fairly slender. Head short, prepectoral length 17 to 22% of total length; snout moderately long and bluntly angular in lateral view, tip rather expanded and bulbous in adults with hypercalcified rostral mass, preoral snout 5.5 to 6.6% of total length, preorbital snout 6.3 to 7.3% of total length; internarial space broad, 2.4 to 2.9% of total length; eyes fairly large, eye length 2.1 to 3 times in preorbital snout and 2.5 to 3.3% of total length; interorbital space 2.4 to 2.9% of total length; mouth moderately long, greater than eye length, its length 2.7 to 3.8% of total length; upper labial furrows about equal to lowers and 1.3 to 2% of total length; teeth molariform and asymmetric, with cusp reduced to a low point, cusplets absent except in very young sharks; buccopharyngeal denticles covering anterior half of palate and mouth floor or entire palate and floor. Interdorsal space 20 to 23% of total length; trailing edges of dorsal fins denticulate, without bare ceratotrichia; first dorsal somewhat falcate, with posterior margin nearly vertical from apex, its midbase closer to pectoral bases than to pelvics; pectoral fins moderate-sized, length of anterior margin 13 to 15% of total length, width of posterior margin 9.8 to 13% of total length; pelvic fins small, anterior margin length 6.5 to 7.9% of total length; anal height 2.9 to 4.7% of total length; anal caudal space greater or subequal to second dorsal height, and 7.1 to 9.1% of total length; ventral caudal lobe more or less falcate in adults. Crowns of lateral trunk denticles lanceolate or tricuspidate, with longitudinal ridges extending their entire length. Rostral node of cranium, hyomandibulae, scapulocoracoid tips; sometimes supraorbital crests and rostral shafts of cranium, extrabranchial cartilages, and radials of second dorsal, pectoral, pelvic, and caudal fin radials hypercalcified in adults; palatoquadrates not subdivided; monospondylous precaudal centra 25 to 39, diplospondylous precaudal centra 34 to 48, precaudal centra 59 to 81. Colour uniform grey or grey-brown, above, light below, no white or dark spots or dark bars; South African examples generally have white-tipped first dorsal and black-tipped second dorsal and caudal. Development viviparous. Size large, adults 63 to 150 cm

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The focus of this study is to examine elasmobranch diversity before and immediately after the ecological disaster to unlock the magnitude of demise on deep-water inhabitants and the timespan for faunal recovery.
Project
• Identify Miocene chondrichthyan faunas from the Mediterranean and Paratethys seas and additional localities around the world. • Analyze the diversification patterns of Mediterranean and Paratethys Miocene chondrichyans and compare the results with other regions. • Evaluate the influence of extrinsic factors on chondrichthyan faunas from the Miocene to the Pliocene on regional (Mediterranean and Paratethys seas) and global scales.