Judy Kim

Judy Kim
Johns Hopkins University | JHU · Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

About

13
Publications
2,422
Reads
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272
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
265 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - August 2014
Georgetown University
Position
  • Laboratory Manager

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
How does first-person sensory experience contribute to knowledge? Contrary to the suppositions of early empiricist philosophers, people who are born blind know about phenomena that cannot be perceived directly, such as color and light. Exactly what is learned and how remains an open question. We compared knowledge of animal appearance across congen...
Article
Full-text available
Learning to read causes the development of a letter- and word-selective region known as the visual word form area (VWFA) within the human ventral visual object stream. Why does a reading-selective region develop at this anatomical location? According to one hypothesis, the VWFA develops at the nexus of visual inputs from retinotopic cortices and li...
Article
Full-text available
The nature of orthographic representations in the human brain is still subject of much debate. Recent reports have claimed that the visual word form area (VWFA) in left occipitotemporal cortex contains an orthographic lexicon based on neuronal representations highly selective for individual written real words (RWs). This theory predicts that learni...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: The neural substrates of semantic representation have been the subject of much controversy. The study of semantic representations is complicated by difficulty in disentangling perceptual and semantic influences on neural activity, as well as in identifying stimulus-driven, "bottom-up" semantic selectivity unconfounded by top-down task-...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of programming to modern society, the cognitive and neural bases of code comprehension are largely unknown. Programming languages might ‘recycle’ neurocognitive mechanisms originally developed for natural languages. Alternatively, comprehension of code could depend on fronto-parietal networks shared with other culturally-inve...
Article
Full-text available
A number of fMRI studies have provided support for the existence of multiple concept representations in areas of the brain such as the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). However, the interaction among different conceptual representations remains unclear. To better understand the dynamics of how the brain extracts meani...
Preprint
Full-text available
Empiricist philosophers such as Locke famously argued that people born blind could only acquire shallow, fragmented facts about color. Contrary to this intuition, we report that blind and sighted people share an in-depth understanding of color, despite disagreeing about arbitrary color facts. Relative to the sighted, blind individuals are less like...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite the importance of programming to modern society, the cognitive and neural bases of code comprehension are largely unknown. Programming languages might 'recycle' neurocognitive mechanisms originally used for natural languages. Alternatively, comprehension of code could depend on fronto-parietal networks shared with other culturally derived s...
Article
Typical readers rely on two brain pathways for word processing in the left hemisphere: temporo-parietal cortex (TPC) and inferior frontal cortex (IFC), thought to subserve phonological decoding, and occipito-temporal cortex (OTC), including the “visual word form area” (VWFA), thought to subserve orthographic processing. How these regions are affect...
Preprint
How does first-person sensory experience contribute to knowledge? Contrary to the suppositions of empiricist philosophers, people who are blind know about phenomena that cannot be perceived directly, such as color and light. Do blind individuals learn about appearance primarily by remembering sighted people’s descriptions of what they see (e.g. “el...
Article
Reading has been shown to rely on a dorsal brain circuit involving the temporoparietal cortex (TPC) for grapheme-to-phoneme conversion of novel words (Pugh et al., 2001), and a ventral stream involving left occipitotemporal cortex (OTC) (in particular in the so-called “visual word form area”, VWFA) for visual identification of familiar words. In ad...

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