Judith Johnson

Judith Johnson
University of Leeds · School of Psychology

PhD, ClinPsyD

About

86
Publications
32,186
Reads
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4,218
Citations
Citations since 2017
63 Research Items
3563 Citations
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Introduction
Judith Johnson is based at both the School of Psychology, University of Leeds, and the Bradford Institute for Health Research. Judith’s research aims to understand and support the development of wellbeing and resilience. She is particularly interested in investigating these topics in healthcare staff. She is also currently researching the role of communication in healthcare settings in order to understand how healthcare staff can be better supported and trained in this aspect of their roles. For more information about Judith's work and blogs about her research, see https://judithjohnsonphd.com.

Publications

Publications (86)
Article
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Introduction Despite widespread recognition that communicating unexpected news during obstetric ultrasound examinations is challenging, there is a dearth of research investigating how to teach evidence-based communication to sonographers. Communication Coaching is a supportive, positive method that has previously been associated with improvements i...
Article
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The West Yorkshire Health and Care Partnership (WY HCP) offers staff and volunteers a range of services designed to support and enhance their mental and emotional wellbeing. This evaluation investigated the factors which facilitate and hinder staff using these services. It was commissioned byWY HCP and completed by theUniversity of Leeds.
Article
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Background Critical incident debriefs are a commonly used occupational health tool for supporting staff after traumatic work incidents. However, there is a dearth of literature evaluating training programmes for debrief facilitators. Aims To evaluate a 5-day training programme to equip healthcare, social care and voluntary, community and social en...
Article
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Background International efforts have been made to develop appropriate interventions to support the mental health needs of healthcare professionals in response to COVID-19. However, fewer staff have accessed these than expected, despite experiencing elevated levels of mental distress since the onset of the pandemic. Consequently, we aimed to examin...
Article
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Objective: The social distancing and isolation measures used to minimise the spread of COVID-19 have negatively impacted anxiety levels. It has been demonstrated that music listening can help reduce anxiety and the current pandemic has called for an examination of the extent to which music listening may be important when social interaction is limit...
Article
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Objective To examine the association of physician burnout with the career engagement and the quality of patient care globally. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and CINAHL were searched from database inception until May 2021. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Observational studies assessing...
Article
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Background and Aims Poor well-being affects the performance of all kinds of workers, including surgeons. This study aimed to answer two questions: (1) how does burnout affect surgeons personally, and what is their burnout experience like? (2) How does burnout affect the care that surgeons provide in the United Kingdom (UK)? Method This study condu...
Article
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Background First responders are faced with stressful and traumatic events in their work that may affect their psychological health. The current review examined the effectiveness of psychological interventions to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, stress and burnout in first responders. Methods Four databases were sear...
Book
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We are overjoyed to see the one-of-a-kind dynamics that the case formulation approach entails by addition of additional chapters to the second edition of the book. As we continue to make progress on the translation of your book, I wanted to let you know how excited we are to be a part of the extraordinary adventure that is the case formulation app...
Article
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Objective To examine the association of physician burnout with the career engagement and the quality of patient care globally. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and CINAHL were searched from database inception until May 2021. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Observational studies assess...
Article
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Background Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among ambulance personnel, but its prevalence varies between developed and developing countries. This study aimed to investigate the lived experience of potentially traumatic work events between Saudi and UK ambulance personnel. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 16 ambulance workers...
Article
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Issue Health care management is faced with a basic conundrum about organizational behavior; why do professionals who are highly dedicated to their work choose to remain silent on critical issues that they recognize as being professionally and organizationally significant? Speaking-up interventions in health care achieve disappointing outcomes beca...
Article
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Background: Making a medical error is a uniquely challenging psychosocial experience for clinicians. Feelings of personal responsibility, coupled with distress regarding potential or actual patient harm resulting from a mistake, create a dual burden. Over the past 20 years, experiential accounts of making an error have provided evidence of the ass...
Technical Report
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Evaluation of the services offered by the West Yorkshire Staff Wellbeing Hub conducted collaboratively between the University of Leeds and the Hub team.
Article
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The West Yorkshire (WY) Staff Wellbeing Hub aims to support NHS, Social Care and Voluntary Sector staff. This evaluation has been conducted as a partnership between the WY Hub and the University of Leeds. It presents data reflecting user uptake and experiences.
Article
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Purpose Three main objectives of this study were as follows: (1) To estimate the prevalence rate of post-traumatic stress disordered (PTSD) symptoms among Saudi paramedics, (2) To investigate which types of coping strategies were associated with PTSD symptoms among Saudi paramedics, (3) To explore which sources of social support were associated wit...
Article
Background Poor wellbeing affects the performance of all types of workers. Surgeons are particularly at risk of suffering from burnout, but minimal qualitative research has examined the causes of burnout and potential solutions in this group. Understanding this could inform the development of future burnout interventions. Purpose This study aimed...
Article
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Background: Critical care nurses (CCNs) are routinely exposed to highly stressful events, exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Supporting resilience and wellbeing of CCNs is therefore crucial to prevent burnout. One approach for delivering this support is by preparing critical care nurses for situations they may encounter, drawing on evidence-...
Article
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Anxiety is the most commonly diagnosed mental health disorder in the EU and 18% of the US population experiences an anxiety disorder at any one time. However, only 20% of individuals experiencing anxiety receive a formally administered intervention, highlighting a need for evidence-based interventions that can be self-administered. Music listening...
Article
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Objectives: To explore attitudes towards assisted dying in dementia (ADID) and the rationales underlying these attitudes, among younger and older adults. Method: We conducted separate focus groups with younger ( n = 11) and older adults ( n = 14) in the United Kingdom with personal or professional experience of dementia. Discussions were prompted b...
Article
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Implicit racial bias is a persistent and pervasive challenge within healthcare education and training settings. A recent systematic review reported that 84% of included studies (31 out of 37) showed evidence of slight to strong pro-white or light skin tone bias amongst healthcare students and professionals. However, there remains a need to improve...
Article
Background Previous systematic reviews have found high burnout in healthcare professionals is associated with poorer patient care. However, no review or meta-analysis has investigated this association in surgeons specifically. The present study addressed this gap, by examining the association between surgeon burnout and 1) patient safety and 2) sur...
Article
This article is a commentary on: Richardson C, Robb KA, O’Connor RC. A systematic review of suicidal behaviour in men: a narrative synthesis of risk factors. Soc Sci Med 2021;276:113831. DOI:10.1016/j. socscimed.2021.113831 . Implications for practice and research: ► When assessing suicide risk in men, clinicians should particularly focus on alco...
Article
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Surgical disciplines are popular and training places are competitive to obtain, but trainees report higher levels of burnout than either their non-surgical peers or attending or consultant surgeons. In this review, we critically summarise evidence on trends and changes in burnout over the past decade, contributors to surgical trainee burnout, the p...
Article
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Background Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) nurses and midwives are under-represented in higher and managerial roles. Aims This study aimed to explore the presence and nature of career progression delays for BAME nurses and midwives and to identify where the barriers to progression were. Design A secondary analysis of data from a wider cro...
Article
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Background The COVID-19 pandemic represents the greatest biopsychosocial emergency the world has faced for a century. The pandemic has changed how individuals live and work, and in particular, frontline healthcare professionals have been exposed to alarming levels of stress. Objective The aim of this study was to understand the professional and pe...
Article
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Objective: To review and synthesise qualitative literature relating to the views, perceptions and experiences of patients with acquired neurological conditions and their caregivers about the process of receiving information about recovery; as well as the views and experiences of healthcare professionals involved in delivering this information. De...
Article
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Rationale, aims and objectives: Consistent data demonstrates negative psychological effects of caregiving on front-line health professionals. Evidence that psychological resilience factors can help minimize distress and the potential for low-cost interventions have created interest in resilience-based development programmes; yet evidence of percei...
Article
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Background Qualitative synthesis approaches are increasingly used in healthcare research. One of the most commonly utilised approaches is meta-ethnography. This is a systematic approach which synthesises data from multiple studies to enable new insights into patients’ and healthcare professionals’ experiences and perspectives. Meta-ethnographies ca...
Article
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Objectives: Despite decades of research, improving health care safety remains a global priority. Individual studies have demonstrated links between staff engagement and care quality, but until now, any relationship between engagement and patient safety outcomes has been more speculative. This systematic review and meta-analysis therefore assessed...
Preprint
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Rationale, aims and objectives: Consistent data demonstrates negative psychological effects of caregiving on front-line health professionals. Evidence that psychological resilience factors can help minimise distress and the potential for low-cost interventions have created interest in resilience-based development programmes; yet evidence of perceiv...
Article
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Background Healthcare professionals are experiencing unprecedented levels of occupational stress and burnout. Higher stress and burnout in health professionals is linked with the delivery of poorer quality, less safe patient care across healthcare settings. In order to understand how we can better support healthcare professionals in the workplace,...
Article
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Introduction Ultrasound is used to diagnose pregnancy complications such as miscarriage and fetal health conditions. Within the UK, findings identified during ultrasound examination are delivered by sonographers as standard. However, little is known about the experiences of sonographers when delivering unexpected news (DUN), the impact this has on...
Article
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Background Values are of high importance to the nursing profession. Value congruence is the extent to which an individual’s values align with the values of their organisation. Value congruence has important implications for job satisfaction. Aim This study explored nurse values, value congruence and potential implications for individual nurses and...
Article
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Background Studies indicate there is a need to improve the delivery of unexpected news via obstetric ultrasound, but there have been few advances in this area. One factor preventing improvement has been a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate phrases and behaviours which sonographers and ultrasound practitioners should use in these situations...
Article
Full-text available
Background: studies indicatethere is a need to improve the delivery of unexpected news via obstetric ultrasound, but there have been few advances in this area. One factor preventing improvement has been a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate phrases and behaviours which sonographers and ultrasound practitioners should use in these situations...
Article
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Background The number of physician associates (PAs) training and working in the UK has increased over the last few years following the proliferation of postgraduate courses. Understanding early experiences and what impacts on engagement is important if we are to appropriately support this relatively new professional group. Methods This paper repor...
Article
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Expectant parents report negative experiences of receiving unexpected news via ultrasound. There is a need to improve communication in this setting, but a lack of understanding on how to achieve this. This systematic review aimed to synthesise findings from qualitative studies exploring experiences of expectant parents or healthcare professionals w...
Article
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Objective: To synthesize the literature on the views and experiences of patients/family members and health-care professionals (HCPs) on the disclosure of adverse events. Methods: Systematic review of qualitative studies. Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Study quality was evaluated using the Critical Apprai...
Article
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Burnout is a growing problem in mental health‐care professionals. Clinical supervision is a mandated part of all psychological therapeutic practice but no previous study has explored whether higher quality supervision is associated with lower burnout in qualified psychological therapists. The study aimed to investigate whether the quality of the su...
Article
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Background Stressful life events are a risk factor for suicidal ideation and behaviour, but the strength and nature of this association is unclear. This review examined the prospective relationship between stressful life events and subsequent suicidal ideation and behaviours. Methods Five databases were searched from inception to April 2019. Eligi...
Chapter
It is well established that high levels of work-related stress are impacting negatively on health, wellbeing and work-related outcomes in healthcare professionals. There is also growing evidence to show that job strain, burnout and low wellbeing are associated with poor patient safety and medical errors. In the UK, errors are estimated to cost the...
Article
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Background Previous studies suggest there is a need to improve the delivery of bad and challenging news in obstetric ultrasound settings. However, no research has explored the experiences of trainee sonographers when learning how to deliver challenging news. Understanding this could identify gaps in current provision and inform future training inte...
Article
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Background Bullying and discrimination may be indirectly associated with patient safety via their contribution to burnout, but research has yet to establish this. Aims The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between workplace bullying, perceived discrimination, levels of burnout and patient safety perceptions in nurses and mid...
Article
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Background: General practitioners (GPs) have particularly high levels of burnout and poor wellbeing. Whilst burnout and poor wellbeing are associated with poorer safety outcomes within secondary care, there have been no quantitative studies investigating this within primary care. Furthermore, little is known about how occupational demands, burnout...
Article
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Background: Sonographers report high levels of burnout. For those working in obstetric ultrasound, one frequently cited stressor is the delivery of bad or difficult news. Training in news delivery may reduce sonographer stress levels, but no studies have investigated sonographer experiences of this training. Aims: To investigate sonographer experi...
Article
Background: Liaison psychiatry nurses in Emergency Departments assess and plan onward treatment for individuals, often following self-harm or suicide attempts. These nurses are at high risk of occupational stress. Reflective practice groups may be beneficial, but there is currently no research evaluating this. Aim: We explored nurses’ experiences o...
Article
Importance Physician burnout has taken the form of an epidemic that may affect core domains of health care delivery, including patient safety, quality of care, and patient satisfaction. However, this evidence has not been systematically quantified. Objective To examine whether physician burnout is associated with an increased risk of patient safet...
Article
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Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of news delivery interventions to improve observer-rated skills, physician confidence, and patient-reported depression/anxiety. Method: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched from inception to September 5, 2016 (updated February 2017). Eligible st...
Article
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Several rare diseases are regularly identified during the prenatal and perinatal periods, including dysmelia. How these are communicated to parents has a marked emotional impact, but minimal research has investigated this. The purpose of this study was to explore parent experiences and preferences when their baby was diagnosed with dysmelia.Twenty...
Article
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Rising levels of burnout and poor well-being in healthcare staff are an international concern for health systems. The need to improve well-being and reduce burnout has long been acknowledged, but few interventions target mental healthcare staff, and minimal improvements have been seen in services. This review aimed to examine the problem of burnout...
Article
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Background Primary care physicians are particularly prone to high levels of burnout and poor wellbeing. Despite this, no qualitative studies have specifically investigated the best ways to improve wellbeing and prevent burnout in primary care physicians. Previous interventions within primary care have been person-oriented and mainly focused on mind...
Article
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Objectives: The aims of the study were (1) to explore whether primary care physicians (general practitioners [GPs]) perceive burnout and well-being to impact on the quality and safety of patient care and (2) to determine potential mechanisms behind these associations. Method: Five focus groups with 25 practicing GPs were conducted in England, ei...
Article
Abstract Burnout is rising in all physicians and cardiologists are not an exemption. Cardiology is a very popular specialty among medical students as it is associated with outstanding training standards and high prestige and income. In this review, we critically summarise the evidence on consequences, causes, and evidence-based interventions for bu...
Article
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In this review we argue in favour of further integration between the disciplines of positive and clinical psychology. We argue that most of the constructs studied by both positive and clinical psychology exist on continua ranging from positive to negative (e.g., gratitude to ingratitude, anxiety to calmness) and so it is meaningless to speak of one...
Article
Background: Negative stressors can aggravate the impact of schizophrenia. However, some people find ways of combating such stressors. There is a dearth of research examining factors which enable Aims: The goal of this study was to investigate resilience to negative stressors in people with disorders on the schizophrenia spectrum using a qualitativ...
Article
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Abstract Background There is growing interest in the relationships between depressive symptoms and burnout in healthcare staff and the safety of patient care. Depressive symptoms are higher in healthcare staff than the general population and overlap conceptually with burnout. However, minimal research has investigated these variables in nurses. Gi...
Article
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Perceptions of failure have been implicated in a range of psychological disorders, and even a single experience of failure can heighten anxiety and depression. However, not all individuals experience significant emotional distress following failure, indicating the presence of resilience. The current systematic review synthesised studies investigati...
Article
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Reappraisal is thought to be an adaptive emotion regulation strategy, and research suggests that individuals who habitually reappraise report more positive patterns of affect overall. However, some experimental studies indicate that a greater tendency to reappraise can exacerbate stress response, and it is unclear whether reappraisal confers resili...
Article
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Objective: To determine whether there is an association between healthcare professionals' wellbeing and burnout, with patient safety. Design: Systematic research review. Data sources: PsychInfo (1806 to July 2015), Medline (1946 to July 2015), Embase (1947 to July 2015) and Scopus (1823 to July 2015) were searched, along with reference lists o...
Article
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Problem and background: Dysmelia is usually detected prenatally or postnatally in maternity services. The provision of family-centred care for parents at the time of initial diagnosis is crucial to facilitate decision making, access to appropriate services, and the provision of parental care-giving, but no research has investigated parent experien...
Article
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The broaden-and-build theory of emotions suggests that positive emotions such as happiness and hope expand thought-action repertoires and support the building of resources and resilience to a variety of psychological disorders. Even brief, transient experiences of positive emotions have been found to increase resilience measured one month later, su...
Article
The goal of the current study was to investigate psychological resilience in the older adults (>64 years) compared with that of the young ones (<26 years). Questionnaire measures of depression, hopelessness, general health and resilience were administered to the participants. The resilience measure comprised three sub-scales of social support, emot...
Article
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Perceptions of defeat have been linked to a range of clinical disorders including psychosis. Perceived defeat sometimes increases in response to failure, but the strength of this association varies between individuals. The present research investigated whether trait reappraisal, a thought-focused coping style, amplified response to stressful events...
Article
Theoretical perspectives into suicidality have suggested that heightened perceptions of defeat and entrapment lead to suicidality. However, all previous empirical work has been cross-sectional. We provide the first longitudinal test of the theoretical predictions, in a sample of 79 students who reported suicidality. Participants completed self-repo...
Article
Suicide is the leading cause of premature death among individuals experiencing psychosis. The risk of suicide is proposed to increase with a greater potential for activation of suicide related schemas. Empirical representations of suicide schemas were compared between individuals experiencing non-affective psychosis, with and without a history of s...
Article
Recent years have seen growing interest into concepts of resilience, but minimal research has explored resilience to suicide and none has investigated resilience to suicide amongst clinical groups. The current study aimed to examine whether a proposed resilience factor, positive self-appraisals of the ability to cope with emotions, difficult situat...
Article
The current study tests whether perceptions of defeat and entrapment are the psychological mechanisms underlying the link between positive psychotic symptoms and suicidal ideation in schizophrenia. A sample of 78 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed self-report measures and a clinical interview. Of this sample, 21.8% reported a...