Judith Galtry

Judith Galtry
Australian National University | ANU

About

21
Publications
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440
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
121 Citations
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Introduction
My research interests are: * New Zealand's role in the global nutrition transition from breastfeeding towards increased uptake of infant formula, with an emphasis on Asia. * the impact of labour market policies and feminist theory on breastfeeding * parental leave policies * skin cancer prevention strategies, including a focus on Vitamin D and skin colour * the life and contribution of feminist theorist, Susan Moller Okin * long-distance buses and climate change.

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Background: There have been recent calls for increased recognition of breastfeeding as a human right. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 (CEDAW) is the core human rights treaty on women. CEDAW's approach to breastfeeding is considered from an historical perspective. A comparison is d...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the life and intellectual contribution of prominent feminist theorist, Susan Moller Okin, in particular her analysis of the challenges posed by multiculturalism for feminism and its relevance for her country of birth, New Zealand.
Article
Full-text available
Breastfeeding is rarely seen as an economic policy issue. Many view the idea of placing a dollar value on mothers’ milk as repugnant. Breastfeeding cannot be framed as simply an economic relationship. It is a complex, physiological, emotional and social relationship between mother and child, intricately related to the nature of the society, communi...
Chapter
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in New Zealand. Australia and New Zealand also lead the world in melanoma incidence rates. This is attributed to various geographical, demographic, and behavioral characteristics in both countries, including high summer ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels, predominantly fair- to medium-skinned populations, and a...
Article
Full-text available
On narrow economic measures of wellbeing, New Zealand's dairy industry is a huge success. Infant formula, in particular, is New Zealand's 'export superstar'. However, using a broader wellbeing lens, there is some public disquiet about environmental, human and animal wellbeing associated with the dairy industry. This article questions whether New Ze...
Article
In the August 2011 issue of Policy Quarterly, Maureen Baker sets out to outline ‘Key issues in parental leave policy’. One aim of the article was to examine ‘some of the continuing debates about paid parental leave’. However, we argue that the article fails to advance debates about paid parental leave in New Zealand, because: 1) it does not adequat...
Article
Full-text available
Using New Zealand as a case study, to determine whether ethnicity is appropriate for communicating sun exposure health promotion messages. This study reviews recent literature on minimising skin cancer risk and achieving sufficient serum vitamin D levels. It draws on a variety of scientific literature, reports and media statements to determine appr...
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand's paid parental leave policy was introduced in 2001. Since then it has been altered a number of times, including an extension to its length and a loosening of eligibility criteria. Given that some parents continue to be ineligible for leave, there have been calls for further expansion of the eligibility criteria and an increase in the l...
Article
Full-text available
In early 2005 the Labour-Progressive government stated that, while New Zealand’s overall labour force participation rates were high, the rate for some groups of women, particularly those aged 25-34 years, were below the OECD average. Given that this is the main childbearing age range for New Zealand women, mothers of young children form a significa...
Article
Full-text available
Parental leave is a complex area of public policy. Concerns include health protection for working mothers, equal employment opportunities for women, access to adequate antenatal and birthing care, maternal recovery, optimal nutrition for infants, and gender equality within families. Given this complexity, the design of parental leave schemes, inclu...
Article
In recent decades there has been a marked rise in the labour market participation of women with infants in many countries. Partly in response to this trend, there are calls for greater emphasis on infant and child health in research and policy development on parental leave and other work-family balancing measures. Yet achieving high rates of breast...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines parental leave policy from the perspective of infant and young child health. Factors assisting the successful integration of breastfeeding and maternal employment are outlined. Health effects of day care attendance are also explored as an integral component of this assessment. It is suggested that the potential health disadvanta...
Article
Full-text available
In 1997, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement strongly supporting the physiological benefits conferred by human milk. It recommended that infants be breastfed for 12 months and called for employers to support breastfeeding. The following year, federal legislation was formulated to facilitate breastfeeding among women i...
Article
Full-text available
Feminist literature has highlighted the way in which pregnancy and childbearing signal ''difference'' from the male labor market norm. The issue of breastfeeding adds complexity to this analysis. This paper argues that, in labor market terms, there are costs attached to breastfeeding for most women. However, health-focused research indicates that t...
Article
Public health authorities in the United States actively promote breast-feeding, with target goals for increased beast-feeding rates by the year 2000. In recent decades, however, there has been an increase in the number of American mothers with infants who are in the labor market. Drawing together research examining the intersection of breast-feedin...
Article
Full-text available
At NIWA's 2006 workshop on ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and its effects, Billingsley and Milne (2006) outlined how the Ultraviolet Index (UVI) was used to communicate SunSmart behaviour and skin cancer risk to the New Zealand public. While the process of communicating the UVI both to the media, who were relied on to communicate the UVI, and to the p...

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Projects (2)
Archived project
Project
This report shows that measures to increase women’s opportunities to engage in optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF), which includes exclusive breastfeeding for six months, and continued breastfeeding to two years and beyond, is an effective and cost eff icient response to the urgent global problem of climate change, that also meets wider social and gender equity and economic goals. Breastfeeding, unlike formula feeding, is an environmentally sustainable method of infant feeding. Industrially manufactured milk formula further adds to the climate change burden