Jude Kornelsen

Jude Kornelsen
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Family Practice

PhD

About

76
Publications
7,663
Reads
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1,352
Citations
Introduction
Jude Kornelsen, PhD, is a health services researcher and Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at UBC who has a focused program of research on rural maternity care. As co-director of the Centre for Rural Health Research, her primary focus involves rural maternal health issues including the emergence and integration of midwifery in our health care system.
Additional affiliations
April 2016 - present
Ministry of Health, Government of British Columbia, Canada
Position
  • Strategic Advisor, Rural and Remote Health
January 2004 - November 2015
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Associate Professor/Co-Director, Centre for Rural Health Research
Description
  • From within the Department of Family Practice at UBC, I co-direct the Centre for Rural Health Research and Direct the Applied Policy Research Unit. The mandate of both is to increase evidence for in rural health care planning.
January 1998 - December 2002
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health
Position
  • Research Associte
Description
  • Research Associate - Women's Health / Maternity Care

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Introduction: Many studies have explored the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on perinatal health, but few have examined the effects of the pandemic on birthing families through a rural lens. Given that the COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced long-standing disparities between urban and rural communities, it is important that...
Article
Full-text available
Background The challenge of including citizen-patient voices in healthcare planning is exacerbated in rural communities by regional variation in priorities and a historical lack of attention to rural healthcare needs. This paper aims to address this deficit by presenting findings from a mixed methods study to understand rural patient and community...
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Background A significant concern for rural patients is the cost of travel outside of their community for specialist and diagnostic care. Often, these costs are transferred to patients and their families, who also experience stress associated with traveling for care. We sought to examine the rural patient experience by (1) estimating and categorizin...
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The attrition of small volume surgical and maternity services in rural Canada over the past three decades has made access to these services especially challenging for rural citizens. While many of these closures have occurred as consequences of regionalization, a strategy to regionally centralize healthcare services, many studies investigating outc...
Article
Introduction: Across Canada and internationally, access to abortion remains challenging, particularly for those living in rural and remote communities. International research and policy call for the training of advanced practice clinicians, including midwives, to provide abortion services to fill the ever-increasing access gap. Research in other j...
Article
Introduction: While 12.4% of British Columbians live rurally, only 2.0% of specialists practise rurally, making interfacility transport of high-acuity patients vital. Decision-making aids have been identified as a way to improve the interfacility transfer process. We conducted a pilot study to explore the potential of the Standardised Early Warnin...
Article
Despite the suggested benefits of shared decision-making (SDM), its implementation in policy and practice has been slow and inconsistent. Use of complex adaptive systems (CAS) theory may provide understanding of how healthcare system factors influence implementation of SDM. Using the example of choice of mode of birth after a previous caesarean sec...
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CONTEXT: Over the past 25 years, the attrition of small volume rural surgery programs across Western Canada has been significant and sustained. The 'Joint position paper on rural surgery and operative delivery' (JPP) offers a consensus policy framework for the sustainability of rural surgical programs by nesting them within larger regional programs...
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Background Family Physicians with Enhanced Surgical Skills (FPESS) have sustained rural operative care, including local access to caesarean section, in many communities across rural Canada and internationally. The contemporary role of FPESS within the health system, however, has not been without challenges. The 12-month Prince Albert Enhanced Surgi...
Article
Introduction: The High Acuity Response Team (HART) was introduced in British Columbia (BC), Canada, to fill a gap in transport for rural patients that was previously being met by nurses and physicians leaving their communities to escort patients in need of critical care. The HART team consists of a critical care registered nurse (CCRN) and registe...
Article
Objective: To investigate whether the fetal fibronectin assay would be useful for determining if a woman was close to a term delivery. If effective, this test would allow parturient women to stay in their communities longer. Design: This feasibility study used a prospective cohort design to examine the negative predictive value of the fetal fibr...
Article
Introduction: In Australia, many small birthing units have closed in recent years, correlating with adverse outcomes including a rise in the number of babies born before arrival to hospital. Concurrently, a raft of national policy and planning documents promote continued provision of rural and remote maternity services, articulating a strategic in...
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Background Australia has a universal health care system and a comprehensive safety net. Despite this, outcomes for Australians living in rural and remote areas are worse than those living in cities. This study will examine the current state of equity of access to birthing services for women living in small communities in rural and remote Australia...
Article
Background: Repeat cesarean delivery is the single largest contributor to the escalating cesarean rate worldwide. Approximately 80 percent of women with a past cesarean are candidates for vaginal birth after a cesarean (VBAC), but in Canada less than one-third plan VBAC. Emerging evidence suggests that these trends may be due in part to nonclinica...
Article
Problem: The past two decades have seen progressive decline in the number of rural birthing services across Australia. Background: Despite health system pressures on small birthing units to close there have been examples of resistance and survival. Aim: This descriptive study explored the evolution of a rural birthing service in a small town t...
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Objectives: By identifying strategies that practicing physicians use in managing patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS), we present an interim practical management guide (IPMG) that clinical practitioners may find useful in their clinical practices and that may help guide future research. Design: A qualitative research stud...
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Problem: Clinical practice guidelines indicate that over 80% of women with a previous caesarean should be offered a planned vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC), however only one third of eligible women choose to plan a VBAC. To support informed choices for birth after caesarean, it is necessary to understand the factors that influence women's dec...
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Background The precipitous closure of rural maternity services in British Columbia (BC), Canada, and internationally has demanded a reevaluation of how to meet the perinatal surgical needs of rural women in accordance with the Triple Aim objectives of safety, cost-effectiveness, and satisfaction of all key stakeholders. There is emerging internatio...
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Formalized rural health service delivery networks are emerging as an over-arching response to the attrition of rural surgical and maternity services in Canada. In effective networks, there is strong collaborative leadership, form follows function, core network elements are identified and site-specific variations are accommodated to meet the surgica...
Article
Background: Primary Maternity Units (PMUs) offer less expensive and potentially more sustainable maternity care, with comparable or better perinatal outcomes for normal pregnancy and birth than higherlevel units. However, little is known about how these maternity services operate in rural and remote Australia, in regards to location, models of car...
Article
Introduction: This article was developed as part of a larger realist review investigating the viability and efficacy of decentralized models of perinatal surgical services for rural women in the context of recent and ongoing service centralization witnessed in many developed nations. The larger realist review was commissioned by the British Columb...
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Full-text available
Objective: to explore perceptions and examples of risk related to pregnancy and childbirth in rural and remote Australia and how these influence the planning of maternity services. Design: data collection in this qualitative component of a mixed methods study included 88 semi-structured individual and group interviews (n=102), three focus groups...
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Full-text available
Decisions to close small maternity units in rural and remote communities have often precipitated a community response as women and families rally to save local services. But where are the midwives? We argue here that professional bodies such as colleges of midwives have a responsibility to advocate more strongly at a political level for evidence-ba...
Article
Decisions to close small maternity units in rural and remote communities have often precipitated a community response as women and families rally to save local services. But where are the midwives? We argue here that professional bodies such as colleges of midwives have a responsibility to advocate more strongly at a political level for evidence-ba...
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Full-text available
Introduction: There has been a steady erosion of family physicians with enhanced surgical skills providing care for rural residents. This has been largely due to the lack of formal training avenues and continuing medical education (CME) opportunities afforded to those interested, and attrition of those currently practicing. Methods: A qualitativ...
Article
Our professional organizations have prepared this paper as part of an integrated, multidisciplinary plan to ensure the availability of well-trained practitioner teams to sustain safe, effective and high-quality rural surgical and operative delivery services. Without these robust local (or nearby) surgical services, sustaining rural maternity care i...
Article
Full-text available
Current diagnostic models in medical practice do not adequately account for patient symptoms that cannot be classified. At the moment, when all known diagnostic possibilities have been excluded, physicians-and patients-confront uncertainty in diagnosis, which gives rise to the label of Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). This phenomenol...
Article
Introduction: There is limited research data on unassisted childbirth (a planned out-of-hospital birth without the attendance of a regulated care provider) in Canada; this means that there is a lack of understanding of its prevalence and of the childbearing women's motivations. This study aimed to uncover women's reasons for planning to give birth...
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Background Available birth settings have diversified in Canada since the integration of regulated midwifery. Midwives are required to offer eligible women choice of birth place; and 25-30% of midwifery clients plan home births. Canadian provincial health ministries have instituted reimbursement schema and regulatory guidelines to ensure access to m...
Article
Introduction: Midwifery has been regulated and publicly funded in British Columbia since 1998. Midwives are currently concentrated in urban areas; access to care is limited in rural communities. Rural midwifery practice can be challenging because of low birth numbers, solo practice, lack of on-site cesareans and specialist backup, and interprofess...
Article
Context: Despite strong evidence supporting the importance of good nutrition in pregnancy for optimal perinatal outcomes, little research exists regarding the experiences of women's access to food in pregnancy. This is particularly true of research on remote Aboriginal women, who may be constrained by local availability and costs of local food. Met...
Article
Background: Maternity services in rural British Columbia have undergone significant changes in the past decade, most notably marked by service closures in over 20 rural services. A potential solution to this rural maternity service delivery challenge is a shift towards midwife-led or interprofessional models of maternity care. However, little is kn...
Article
A substantial number of small surgical services in rural Canada have been discontinued in the past 15 years because of difficulties recruiting and retaining practitioners, health care restructuring and a lack of a coherent evidence base regarding the safety of small services. The objective of this study was to examine the safety of small perinatal...
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Full-text available
Ours is a qualitative investigation that interviews practitioners and patients about the phenomenon of MUPS (medically unexplained physical symptoms)–i.e., the context of lacking clear diagnostic and treatment options and the experience of being “not yet diagnosed.” With regard to practitioners, since current diagnostic models in medical practice d...
Article
Background: Challenges to the sustainability of rural healthcare in Canada demands innovative solutions to human resources shortages in rural communities.One solution is to support generalists with enhanced skills to meet some of the surgical needs of rural residents. Despite favourable outcomes, generalist surgical care is becoming a vanishing opt...
Article
Many rural communities across canada are facing challenges to the sustainability of core emergency and acute care health services, primarily due to problems with medical and nursing staffing. data related to service efficacy and effectiveness are not well organized. most of canada still relies on reporting by large geopolitical areas (local health...
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Background A significant number of Canadian rural communities offer local maternity services in the absence of caesarean section back-up to parturient residents. These communities are witnessing a high outflow of women leaving to give birth in larger centres to ensure immediate access to the procedure. A minority of women choose to stay in their ho...
Article
The proportion of cesarean sections is increasing in Canada overall and in British Columbia in particular. It has been suggested that this increase is partially the result of women requesting the procedure, although the prevalence of patient-initiated elective cesarean section is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of...
Article
Objectives: interprofessional primary maternity care has emerged as one potential solution to the current health human resource shortage in many developed nations. This study explores the barriers to and facilitators of interprofessional models of maternity care between physicians, nurses, and midwives in rural British Columbia, Canada, and the ch...
Article
Rural pregnant woman who lack local access to maternity care due to their remote living circumstances may experience stress and anxiety related to pregnancy and parturition. The Rural Pregnancy Experience Scale (RPES) was designed to assess the unique worry and concerns reflective of the stress and anxiety of rural pregnant women related to pregnan...
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Full-text available
In the past fifteen years there has been a wave of closures of small maternity services in Canada and other developed nations which results in the need for rural parturient women to travel to access care. The purpose of our study is to systematically document newborn and maternal outcomes as they relate to distance to travel to access the nearest m...
Article
Bella Bella/Waglisla is a small community of 1,250 First Nations residents on British Columbia’s Central Coast that has enjoyed a long history of birth within the community. This ended in 2000 when services began to decline, forcing women to travel to distant referral centres before starting labour. This qualitative investigation documents the expe...
Article
The objective of this study is to compare the level of stress and anxiety between women resident in communities with different degrees of access to local maternity services. Design:  Cross-sectional survey. Fifty-two communities across rural British Columbia with different levels of access to maternity care services (ranging from no services to loc...
Article
Patient-initiated elective Caesarean section (PIECS) is increasingly prevalent and is emerging as an urgent issue for individual maternity practitioners, hospitals, and policy makers, as well as for maternity patients. This qualitative study sought to explore women's experiences of the decision-making process leading to elective operative delivery...
Article
The number of rural hospitals offering maternity care in British Columbia has significantly declined since 2000, mirroring trends of closures and service reductions across Canada. The impact on Aboriginal women is significant, contributing to negative maternal and newborn health and social outcomes. The present qualitative case study explored the i...
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Full-text available
Patient-initiated elective cesarean delivery is emerging as an urgent issue for practitioners, hospitals, and policy makers and for pregnant women. This exploratory qualitative study looks at the birth stories and cultural knowledge that women use to inform the decision about an elective cesarean without medical indication. Data collection consiste...
Article
To develop and apply a population isolation model to define the appropriate level of maternity service for rural communities in British Columbia, Canada. Iterative, mathematical model development supported by extensive multi-methods research in 23 rural and isolated communities in British Columbia, Canada, which were selected for representative var...
Article
Although there has been a devolution of local rural maternity services across Canada in the past 10 years in favour of regional centralization, little is known about the health outcomes of women who must travel for care. The objective of this study was to compare intervention rates and outcomes between women who live adjacent to maternity service w...
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Full-text available
In spite of a sharp decline, since 2000, in the number of rural communities in Canada that offer local maternity care, there remain significant numbers of small rural maternity services that provide elective maternity care without on-site access to cesarean section. In communities with an elective maternity service without local access to surgical...
Article
Between 2000 and 2004, 17 small rural maternity care services in British Columbia (BC) closed or were placed under moratoria. This paper explores the experiences of care providers in 4 rural BC communities that have lost or are at risk of losing their local maternity services. We conducted qualitative, semistructured interviews and focus groups wit...
Article
The closure of many local maternity services has given rise to contemporary realities of care for many rural parturient women in Canada, which, in turn, determines their experience of birth. To date, we do not have an understanding of the realities influencing the birthing experiences of rural parturient women. This qualitative investigation explor...
Article
This paper explores the connection between our cultural inclination towards technology, the nature of technology itself, and birthing women's attitudes towards obstetrical technology using an analytical framework that includes literature on the philosophy of technology, as well as the sociology of childbirth. Data were gathered using a survey instr...
Article
To investigate rural parturient women's experiences of obstetric care in the context of the social and economic realities of life in rural, remote, and small urban communities. Data collection for this exploratory qualitative study was carried out in 7 rural communities chosen to represent diversity of size, distance to hospital with Caesarean sect...
Article
There has been a precipitous decline in the number of rural communities across Canada providing local maternity care. The evidence suggests that the outcome for newborns may be worse as a result. There is also an emerging understanding of the significant physiological and psychosocial consequences for rural parturient women. Because they cannot pla...
Article
There has been a precipitous decline in the number of rural communities across Canada providing local maternity care. The evidence suggests that the outcome for newborns may be worse, as a result. There is also an emerging understanding of the significant physiological and psychosocial consequences for rural parturient women. Because they cannot pl...
Article
This study describes some of the results of a survey conducted shortly after the introduction of midwives as a regulated and publicly funded provider within the British Columbia health care system. The survey asked hospital-based perinatal nurses about their knowledge and attitudes of midwifery and their experiences with midwives. Results suggest t...
Article
University Microfilms order no. UMI00391254. Thesis (M.A.)--Simon Fraser University, 1992. Includes bibliographical references.

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