Juan Olvido Perea García

Juan Olvido Perea García
Leiden University | LEI · Faculty of Social Sciences

Postdoctoral researcher

About

14
Publications
3,912
Reads
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91
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
89 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - August 2017
Aarhus University
Position
  • RA
Education
August 2017 - August 2021
National University of Singapore
Field of study
  • Evolutionary biology
September 2013 - September 2015
Aarhus University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Semiotics
September 2008 - June 2012
University of Malaga
Field of study
  • English Philology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Homogeneously depigmented sclerae have long been proposed to be uniquely human—an adaptation to enable cooperative behaviour by facilitating interpersonal coordination through gaze following. However, recent evidence has shown that deeply pigmented sclerae also afford gaze following if surrounding a bright iris. Furthermore, while current scleral d...
Article
Full-text available
External eye appearance across primate species is diverse in shape and colouration, yet we still lack an explanation for the drivers of such diversity. Here we quantify substantial interspecific variation in eye shape and colouration across 77 primate species representing all extant genera of anthropoid primates. We reassess a series of hypotheses...
Preprint
Full-text available
Homogeneously depigmented sclerae have long been proposed to be uniquely human - an adaptation to enable cooperative behaviour by facilitating interpersonal coordination through gaze following. However, recent evidence has shown that deeply pigmented sclerae also afford gaze following if surrounding a bright iris. Furthermore, while current scleral...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative examinations of external eye morphology in primates initially focused on communicative functions of the eye. Subsequent work has failed to find consistent associations between specific eye morphologies and communicative functions. In this article, we review the field of primate external eye morphology and inspect publicly available and...
Article
Full-text available
The horizontal size of the exposed depigmented sclera in Caucasians has been previously suggested to be sexually dimorphic, and the significance of this phenomenon remains unclear. Here we build on a previous study and extend it by (i) examining sex differences in other measures of ocular morphology and (ii) exploring the link between eye morpholog...
Article
Full-text available
Captivity may have adverse effects on captive great apes, as they spend much more of their time engaged in foraging and other activities in the wild. Enrichment interventions have the potential to alleviate the adverse effects of captivity by introducing novel stimuli. In orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), interactive digital enrichment has proven effect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The implementation of Virtual Reality (VR) tools in criminological research is very scarce, and almost non-existent in the fear of crime (FoC) field. Our objective is to assess the feasibility of Immersive Technologies for research on FoC. To do so, a simulation (360° video) grounded on the manipulation of environmental variables (street lighting)...
Article
Full-text available
Gaze following has been argued to be uniquely human, facilitated by our depigmented, white sclera [M. Tomasello, B. Hare, H. Lehmann, J. Call, J. Hum. Evol. 52, 314–320 (2007)]—the pale area around the colored iris—and to underpin human-specific behaviors such as language. Today, we know that great apes show diverse patterns of scleral coloration [...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the adaptive function of the unique morphology of the human eye, in particular its overexposed white sclera, may have profound implications for the fields of evolutionary behavioural science, and specifically the areas of human interaction and social cognition. Existing hypotheses, such as the cooperative eye hypothesis, have attracte...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of attitudinal and sociodemographic variables on the perceived offensiveness of online communication and hate speech. We conducted an experimental study in which 373 participants rated their perception of offensiveness of four kinds of violent content (direct incitement to violence/threat, exaltatio...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Self-reports and questionnaires have been the preferred research methods in the criminological field of “fear of crime” (FOC) since its rise in the 1960s. Our study had two main goals: (1) to measure the physiological indicators of fear in real time and (2) to compare these data with those obtained through self-reports, designed also to...
Article
Full-text available
The notion that phenomenologically observable differences in the human eye are correlated with behavioral tendencies (other than gaze-following) has been addressed poorly in the psychological literature. Most notably, the proposed correlations are based on an arbitrary categorization in discrete categories of the continuous variability across vario...
Article
We present the results of an empirical study that measured the contribution of a conspicuous eye-gaze (as a function of scleral de-pigmentation) of humans in conveying multimodal referentiality by combining visual and auditory cues in a naturalistic setting. We made participants interact in a cooperative task in which they had to convey referential...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-examining evidence from comparative morphology has become a way to support specific hypotheses in social cognition. In particular, ocular morphology has been compared across extant primate species in order to argue that humans present a unique morphology that enables also an uniquely human array of socio-cognitive functions-including a crucia...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi everyone,
I'm interested in knowing differences in baseline levels of cortisol between Pan. spp. (bonobos and chimps).
I've only found studies reporting differential responses to acute stressors (ie., anticipation to food sharing). There's also a bunch of studies out there but their results are hard to compare because of differences in collection, analysis, etc.
Do you know of any study reporting said differences?

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
To describe the extant diversity and understand the evolutionary history of eye coloration in primates. Social signaling, environmental adaptations and epistatic effects.
Project
Comparing ocular morphologies among extant great apes to better understand their functions and how they evolved.