Juan Jesús Llibre-Rodriguez

Juan Jesús Llibre-Rodriguez
Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana · Centro de Estudios Alzheimer

MD, MS, PhD

About

175
Publications
38,750
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Citations
Introduction
Juan J. Llibre Rodriguez is Professor of Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine at the Medical University of Havana, Finlay Albarran, School of Medicine. He funded the Cuban Section of Alzheimer’s disease in 1996. He trained in Geriatric Medicine at the Medical University of Havana and Epidemiology at the London University (LSHTM). She obtained his MD in 1983 and his PhD in 1998 from the Medical University of Havana and a second PhD in Epidemiology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King College London in 2012. He was awarded with the title of Doctor in Sciences (DSc) in 2014. His focus of research is on the prevalence of dementia in low and middle income countries, as part of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. He has coordinated a multidisciplinary team and Dementia Unit since 1990 in Havana and also several courses and trainning address to professional and caregivers of people with dementia. He is the Principal Investigator of the 10/66 International Dementia Research Group in Cuba. Dr. Llibre coordinates the MSc in Dementia Care and Research at the Medical University of Havana and a National Postgraduate Diploma in Dementia. He has been published three books related with Aging, dementia and mental health and more than 85 articles in the last 10 years, including Lancet, 2008, 372: 464–74; Neuroepidemiology 2008;31:243–251 and  The American Medical Directors Association • Journal (JAMDA) DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2017.09.026 Juan J. Llibre is an Oficial member of Cuban Academic of Sciences for two periods (2012-2018 and 2018 - 2024). He received the Anual Awards of Cuban Academy of Sciences, 2014 and the Anual Award of Cuban Health in 2011, 2015 and 2017. Over the past decades, Dr Llibre´s research focused on the epidemiology of dementia (in particular Alzheimer’s disease), and other NCDs in older Cubans, and the study of vascular factors, APOE and lifestyle factors in the etiology of dementia.
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - present
Finlay Albarran Medical Faculty, UCM,Havana, Cuba
Position
  • Head of Department
Description
  • His main focus of research is on the prevalence of dementia in low and middle income countries, as part of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. He has coordinated, since 2002 the Disability and Dementia Research Program in Cuba.
January 2010 - present
Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana
Position
  • Head of Department
Description
  • Professor of Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine. His main focus of research is the epidemiology of dementia, CNCD and Mental Health in elderly people. He coordinates the National MSc in Dementia Care.
January 2010 - present
Finlay Albarran Faculty, UCM-H
Position
  • Head of Department
Description
  • Professor of Internal Medicine and Geriatric. His main focus of research is on the epidemiology of dementia, CNCD and Mental Health in elderly people. Coordinator of the MSc in Dementia Care at the Medical University of Havana .
Education
January 2012 - February 2014
Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana
Field of study
  • Doctor en Ciencias
January 2008 - May 2012
King College London
Field of study
  • Epidemiology
January 1995 - January 1998
Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana
Field of study
  • Ciencias Medicas

Publications

Publications (175)
Article
Full-text available
We aimed to estimate the prevalence, correlates and impact of dementia in Havana and Matanzas, Cuba. A 1-phase catchment area survey of all over 65-year-old residents of 7 catchment areas in Havana and 1 in Matanzas was conducted. Dementia diagnosis was established according to DSM-IV and our own, pre-validated 10/66 criteria. The impact of dementi...
Article
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The prevalence and incidence of dementia are low in Nigeria, but high among African-Americans. In these populations there is a high frequency of the risk-conferring APOE-e4 allele, but the risk ratio is less than in Europeans. In an admixed population of older Cubans we explored the effects of ethnic identity and genetic admixture on APOE genotype,...
Article
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Studies have suggested that the prevalence of dementia is lower in developing than in developed regions. We investigated the prevalence and severity of dementia in sites in low-income and middle-income countries according to two definitions of dementia diagnosis. We undertook one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and olde...
Article
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Translated from the Spanish and reprinted with permission from the Revista Anales de la Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, [online] Vol. 2, No. 2, 2012. Original available at: http://www.revistaccuba.cu/index.php/acc/article/view/126 Dementia is a syndrome that has great repercussions for quality of life of patients and their families, as well as a high...
Article
Background: There have been few cross-national studies of the prevalence of the frailty phenotype conducted among low or middle income countries. We aimed to study the variation in prevalence and correlates of frailty in rural and urban sites in Latin America, India, and China. Methods: Cross-sectional population-based catchment area surveys con...
Article
Background: Age and gender specific prevalence rates for parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease (PD) are important to guide research, clinical practice, and public health planning; however, prevalence estimates in Latin America (LatAm) are limited. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of parkinsonism and PD and examine related risk factors in a cohor...
Article
Rapid technological advances offer a possibility to develop cost‐effective digital cognitive assessment tools. However, it is unclear whether these measures are suitable for application in populations from Low and Middle‐Income Countries (LMIC). In this cross‐sectional study, we examined the accuracy and validity of the Brian Health Assessment (BHA...
Article
Previous research showed that up to 56% of all dementia cases in Latin America could potentially be prevented if all modifiable risk factors were eliminated. Trends of studies in Latin America show, however, that lifestyles are declining. In absence of a cure, prevention is crucial. The aim was to develop a tool that can be used in primary care set...
Article
Background: Latinos represent the fastest growing proportion of dementia cases among different ethnic groups. Most of the studies in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) include Latino populations within the same group, failing to sufficiently account for the real richness of linguistic, ethnic, ancestry, cultural, and socioeconomic diversity represented acro...
Article
Background: APOE-ε4 allele is the most significant genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). The magnitude of the association between the APOE-ε4 allele, AD, and cognitive decline has been shown to be stronger in populations of European descent relative to populations of African descent. However, these associations have been under...
Article
Objective Teleneuropsychology (teleNP) could potentially expand access to services for patients who are confined, have limited personal access to healthcare, or live in remote areas. The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased the use of teleNP for cognitive assessments. The main objective of these recommendations is to ident...
Article
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia has emerged as a significant societal issue and a global priority. The prevalence of dementia is rising more rapidly in low and middle income countries (LMIC) than in high income countries. A growing body of evidence shows that prevention through risk factor management is the key to reducing the burden of demen...
Article
Full-text available
Background The World Health Organization (WHO) has reframed health and healthcare for older people around achieving the goal of healthy ageing. The recent WHO Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE) guidelines focus on maintaining intrinsic capacity, i.e., addressing declines in neuromusculoskeletal, vitality, sensory, cognitive, psychological, an...
Article
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Introduction: Despite high dementia prevalence in Hispanic populations globally, especially Caribbean Hispanics, no study has comparatively examined the association between education and dementia among Hispanics living in the Caribbean Islands and older adults in the United States. Methods: We used data on 6107 respondents aged 65 and older in t...
Article
Introducción: La demencia es el padecimiento que más contribuye a la discapacidad, dependencia y mortalidad en las personas mayores.⁽¹⁾ Sin embargo, se desconoce la frecuencia y naturaleza del problema en la población más envejecida de la provincia La Habana, Cuba. Objetivos: Determinar la prevalencia y factores de riesgo de demencia en personas d...
Article
El síndrome de fragilidad se caracteriza por una mayor vulnerabilidad y riesgo de deterioro funcional y cognitivo ante un estrés mínimo, siendo la demencia una de las principales causas de discapacidad y dependencia entre los adultos mayores a nivel global, con impacto físico, psicológico y social. y económico no solo en las personas que lo padecen...
Article
Introducción: En Cuba, la prevalencia de las enfermedades demenciales (10,2 %) constituye una realidad a la que se enfrenta hoy día el Sistema Nacional de Salud. La demencia repercute no solo en la persona que la padece, sino en su familia y sobre todo en la salud del cuidador, quien es sometido a cambios físicos y emocionales que comprometen su ca...
Poster
Background: Rapid technological advances offer a possibility to develop cost-effective digital cognitive assessment tools. However, it is unclear whether these measures are suitable for application in Spanish-speaking populations living in the United States and in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC). The Brain Health Assessment (BHA) is a tablet...
Article
In Cuba, 10 % of people aged 65 years and over are living with dementia, mainly Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this review is to provide information about the impact of COVID 19 on one of the most vulnerable groups in the population, people with dementia, and to provide useful recommendations to healthcare professionals, families and caregivers. T...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cuba’s life expectancy at 79 is third highest in Latin America. Many attribute this to social investments in health and education, but comparative research is sparse, thus we compare Cuba with neighboring Dominican Republic, Costa Rica due to its strong social protections, and the U.S. Given high cardiovascular mortality, we focus on car...
Article
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Objectives: This study was designed to explore prevalence and correlates of self-reported loneliness and to investigate whether loneliness predicts mortality among older adults (aged 65 or above) in Latin America, China and India. Methods: The study investigated population-based cross-sectional (2003–2007) and longitudinal surveys (follow-up 2007–2...
Article
Background: Population aging will lead to a dramatic increase in dementia prevalence, which will disproportionally affect racial minorities. The presence of racial differences in dementia prevalence has been widely reported in United States, but there are no relevant studies on this topic in low-middle income countries (LMIC). Methods: In a cros...
Article
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Across Latin American and Caribbean countries (LACs), the fight against dementia faces pressing challenges, such as heterogeneity, diversity, political instability, and socioeconomic disparities. These can be addressed more effectively in a collaborative setting that fosters open exchange of knowledge. In this work, the Latin American and Caribbean...
Article
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During the last decade, the Caribbean Hispanic islands experienced accelerated demographic aging, representing the fastest aging region within Latin America. Age-related non-communicable diseases, including dementia, are now reported at high prevalence. The Caribbean islands share similar genetic ancestry, culture, migration patterns, and risk prof...
Article
More than 300 pathogenic variants in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 genes have been reported causing Dominant Inhered Alzheimer Disease (DIAD); most of these reports come from Northern hemisphere countries. In recent years, a growing number of familial AD cases have become known in Central and South American countries; however, little is known about epidemio...
Article
Hispanics populations in the U.S. are more likely to develop dementia than non‐Hispanic White populations; among Hispanics, those with Caribbean origin seem to carry the higher risk for developing dementia. However, little is known about how various social risk factors for dementia differentially affect non‐Hispanic Whites and Hispanics of Caribbea...
Article
Little is known about risk factors of dementia in Latin American countries. Findings from western countries cannot be readily translated to Latin American countries. To inform risk stratification and targeted preventive strategies, we aimed to identify risk factors of incident dementia in Cuban older adults and explores how these change with age. D...
Article
Introduction: A growing number of dominantly inherited Alzheimer's disease (DIAD) cases have become known in Latin American (LatAm) in recent years. However, questions regarding mutation distribution and frequency by country remain open. Methods: A literature review was completed aimed to provide estimates for DIAD pathogenic variants in the Lat...
Article
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The SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic will disproportionately impact countries with weak economies and vulnerable populations including people with dementia. Latin American and Caribbean countries (LACs) are burdened with unstable economic development, fragile health systems, massive economic disparities, and a high prevalence of dementia. Here, we unders...
Article
Background: Rapid technological advances offer a possibility to develop cost-effective digital cognitive assessment tools. However, it is unclear whether these measures are suitable for application in populations from Low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Objective: To examine the accuracy and validity of the Brain Health Assessment (BHA) in d...
Article
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION Age-related cognitive disorders, including Alzheimer disease, are among the main causes of disability and dependence in older adults worldwide. High blood homocysteine levels (hyperhomocysteinemia) are a risk factor for diseases whose metabolism involves different B vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins provide a protective effect by mitigati...
Article
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia has emerged as a significant societal issue and a global priority. The prevalence of dementia is rising more rapidly in low and middle income countries (LMIC) than in high income countries. Yet, knowledge of dementia risk factors is dominated by research from high income countries (HIC), which cannot be readily...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Little is known about risk factors of dementia in Latin American countries. We aimed to identify socio–demographic, health and lifestyle risk factors of incident dementia in Cuban older adults. Methods: Data were from 1,846 participants in the Cuban cohort of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. Participants completed questionnaires, he...
Article
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Background: Dementia shows sex difference in its epidemiology. Childbirth, a distinctive experience of women, is associated with the risk for various diseases. However, its association with the risk of dementia in women has rarely been studied. Methods: We harmonized and pooled baseline data from 11 population-based cohorts from 11 countries ove...
Article
Background We examined how the relationship between education and latelife cognitive impairment (defined as a Mini Mental State Examination score below 24) is influenced by age, sex, ethnicity, and Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE*4). Methods Participants were 30,785 dementia-free individuals aged 55-103 years, from 18 longitudinal cohort studies,...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of COVID–19 on Mental Health in the Hispanic Caribbean Region - Jorge J Llibre-Guerra, Ivonne Z. Jiménez-Velázquez, Juan J Llibre-Rodriguez, Daisy Acosta
Article
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Background To date, dementia prediction models have been exclusively developed and tested in high-income countries (HICs). However, most people with dementia live in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), where dementia risk prediction research is almost non-existent and the ability of current models to predict dementia is unknown. This st...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Research carried out in high income countries suggests that loneliness may be a common experience among older adults living in these settings. Loneliness is correlated with poor socioeconomic status, living alone, being widowed and is associated with adverse health outcomes, including mortality. There is still a lack of evidence about th...
Chapter
Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico, otherwise known as the Spanish Insular Caribbean, comprise a subgroup of insular territories that have similar cultural, historical, and colonial backgrounds. The Spanish Insular Caribbean population faces a particularly high risk for dementia, and only steadily emerging, albeit unique behavioral and p...
Article
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Objectives: Depression and anxiety are common mental disorders in later life. Few population-based studies have investigated their potential impacts on mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aim of this study is to examine the associations between depression, anxiety, their comorbidity and mortality in later life using a popula...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background The World Health Organization has reframed health and healthcare for older people around achieving the goal of healthy ageing. Recent evidence-based guidelines on Integrated Care for Older People focus on maintaining intrinsic capacity, addressing declines in mobility, nutrition, vision and hearing, cognition, mood and continence aiming...
Article
Full-text available
Background: With no effective treatments for cognitive decline or dementia, improving the evidence base for modifiable risk factors is a research priority. This study investigated associations between risk factors and late-life cognitive decline on a global scale, including comparisons between ethno-regional groups. Methods and findings: We harm...
Article
Full-text available
With no effective treatments for cognitive decline or dementia, improving the evidence base for modifiable risk factors is a research priority. This study investigated associations between risk factors and late-life cognitive decline on a global scale, including comparisons between ethno-regional groups.
Article
Introducción: La OMS en su 70a Asamblea Mundial de la Salud realizada el 29 de mayo del 2017 en Ginebra, Suiza, aprobó el Plan de Acción Mundial para enfrentar las demencias. La demencia afecta a 50 millones de personas en el mundo, si no se logra una intervención eficaz esta cifra casi se triplicará para el año 2050. Esta enfermedad puede llegar a...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Frailty and depression are highly comorbid conditions, but the casual direction is unclear and has not been explored in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of depression on incident frailty in older people living in Latin America. Methods: This study was based on a population...
Article
Objectives: Growing evidence shows that cardiovascular health (CVH) is associated with brain health. Little is known about this topic among older adults in Latin America, where the number of people living with dementia is rising. This study aimed to assess the longitudinal association between cardiovascular health and dementia in six Latin America...
Article
Full-text available
Introducción: Las demencias son consideradas la primera causa de discapacidad en los adultos mayores. A la vez, los ancianos, por lo general, suelen necesitar progresivas atenciones y, por lo tanto, se vuelven en cierta medida dependientes, contribuyendo así a la carga económica y al estrés psicológico de sus familiares, cuidadores, enfermeros y de...
Article
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Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate healthy life expectancies in eight low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), using two indicators: disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) and dependence-free life expectancy (DepFLE). Method: Using the Sullivan method, healthy life expectancy was calculated based on the prevalence of depende...
Article
Full-text available
Background Adult leg length is influenced by nutrition in the first few years of life. Adult head circumference is an indicator of brain growth. Cross-sectional studies indicate inverse associations with dementia risk, but there have been few prospective studies. Methods Population-based cohort studies in urban sites in Cuba, Dominican Republic Pu...
Article
Full-text available
Background Exposure to endogenous estrogen may protect against dementia, but evidence remains equivocal. Such effects may be assessed more precisely in settings where exogenous estrogen administration is rare. We aimed to determine whether reproductive period (menarche to menopause), and other indicators of endogenous estrogen exposure are inversel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Diabetes prevalence is already high in middle income countries, particularly among older people. Current evidence on diabetes as a risk factor for dementia is limited to cohort studies in high income countries. Few studies carried out fasting glucose assessments to identify undiagnosed cases, and assess diabetes control. We aimed to dete...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Adult leg length is influenced by nutrition in the first few years of life. Adult head circumference is an indicator of brain growth. Cross-sectional studies indicate inverse associations with dementia risk, but there have been few prospective studies. Methods Population-based cohort studies in urban sites in Cuba, Dominican Republic Pu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Exposure to endogenous estrogen may protect against dementia, but evidence remains equivocal. Such effects may be assessed more precisely in settings where exogenous estrogen administration is rare. We aimed to determine whether reproductive period (menarche to menopause), and other indicators of endogenous estrogen exposure are inversel...