Juan José García-Granero

Juan José García-Granero
Spanish National Research Council | CSIC · Institución Milà y Fontanals

PhD

About

58
Publications
18,783
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Citations
Introduction
I am an archaeobotanist interested in how prehistoric societies interacted with their environment in terms of plant food acquisition and transformation practices, particularly during the Neolithic and Bronze Age. To address these issues I analyse mainly starch grains and phytoliths, with an emphasis on the integration of multiple archaeological proxies. My current research focuses mostly on South Asia and the Mediterranean region.
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - September 2019
University of Oxford
Position
  • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellow
March 2016 - March 2017
Spanish National Research Council
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2016 - March 2016
University Pompeu Fabra
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2011 - June 2015
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Archaeology
September 2010 - September 2011
University College London
Field of study
  • Environmental Archaeology
September 2006 - February 2010
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • History

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
The thorough reconstruction of subsistence practices throughout human history remains one of the most challenging questions in archaeological research. Analyses of microbotanical remains recovered from archaeological artefacts have greatly contributed to our knowledge of past livelihood strategies. However, certain methodological issues are seldom...
Article
Botanical evidence suggests that North Gujarat (India) was a primary center of plant domestication during the mid-Holocene. However, lack of systematic archaeobotanical research and significant taphonomic processes have so far hampered the possibility of substantiating this hypothesis. This paper explores the role of plants in the subsistence strat...
Article
Full-text available
Most research on the plant genus Phoenix has focused on Phoenix dactylifera (date palm) due to its worldwide economic importance. Comparatively less attention has been devoted to other species within this genus that are also socio-economically important at a local scale, such as Phoenix theophrasti (Cretan date palm). The aim of this paper is to br...
Article
Full-text available
The analysis of microbotanical remains (starch grains and phytoliths) from food-related domestic contexts and artefacts has the potential to provide insights into daily plant preparation and consumption activities. In particular, pottery vessels offer an unparalleled comparative framework for the study of food preparation and consumption, since pot...
Article
The analysis of starch grains from food-related archaeological artefacts and human dental calculus has provided evidence for the consumption of plant resources worldwide. Recently, and based on experimental research, starch grain analysis has also been used as a proxy to reconstruct food transformation in the archaeological record through the analy...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable confusion and uncertainty persist on the cultural and chronological contexts of Holocene microlithic assemblages reported from South Asia. The paucity of securely dated sites with microlithic remains has compounded the confusion. Evidence from sites securely attributed to the Mesolithic based on a holistic approach (including direct ev...
Poster
Full-text available
Preliminary results of the microbotanical analysis of the grinding stones from Frydenlund, an archaeological site of the Funnel Beaker culture phase Ic. The site was excavated in 2009-2012 by Odense Bys Museer and Moesgaard Museum.
Article
Currently, the development of mobile pastoralism in Mongolia is known almost exclusively from burial and ritual contexts. Here we present the results of archaeological excavations and geoarchaeological work carried out at a deeply stratified multiperiod habitation site in northwestern Mongolia. Data include an unprecedented number of well-preserved...
Article
Full-text available
This study attempts a holistic approach to past foodways in prehistoric northern Gujarat, India, by considering evidence of food production, distribution, preparation and consumption. We present here the results of a pilot residue study, integrating lipid and starch grain analyses, conducted on 28 ceramic vessels from three Chalcolithic/Harappan se...
Article
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Systematic archaeobotanical research in the Bronze Age Aegean has greatly expanded our knowledge regarding staple crops and aspects such as palaeoecology, human diet and food production. However, some plant foodstuffs remain ‘invisible’ to conventional archaeobotanical methods. This study explores the use of plant ingredients in Minoan cuisine thro...
Article
This article argues that a holistic approach to documenting and understanding the physical evidence for individual cities would enhance our ability to address major questions about urbanisation, urbanism, cultural identities and economic processes. At the same time we suggest that providing more comprehensive data-sets concerning Greek cities would...
Article
Intensive archaeobotanical research in northern Greece and other circum-Mediterranean regions over the last two decades has demonstrated an extensive spectrum of domestic and wild plants consumed by Neolithic communities. However, macrobotanical remains are seldom associated with the artefact in which they were cooked, and therefore we know the lis...
Article
Full-text available
The exploitation of lithic resources was an important aspect of prehistoric resource exploitation strategies and adaptation. Research has mostly focused on technological and spatial aspects of lithic factory sites, often overlooking how these sites were integrated within local socioecological dynamics in terms of food acquisition and consumption. T...
Article
Full-text available
The identification of fuel-related practices in archaeological contexts is almost always associated with the identification of fire-related structures. Charcoal analysis is the standard method of identifying wood use in the past; however, in many circumstances wood was not the primary source of fuel. In arid and semi-arid environments alternative f...
Article
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ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Getreide gehören weltweit zu den wichtigsten Grundnahrungsmitteln. Trotzdem ist wenig darüber bekannt, in welcher Form sie in vorgeschichtlicher Zeit konsumiert wurden. Das am IPNA durchgeführte Arbeitstreffen brachte deshalb internationale Experten und Expertinnen von botanischen Makroresten (Samen, Früchte usw.), Mikroresten ( St...
Article
Full-text available
The origins of agriculture and the shift from hunting and gathering to committed agriculture is regarded as one of the major transitions in human history. Archaeologists and anthropologists have invested significant efforts in explaining the origins of agriculture. A period of gathering intensification and experimentation and pursuing a mixed econo...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the introduction of domesticated crops in Sudan. Substantial early evidence of the cereals wheat and barley has, until recently, been mainly restricted to the post-Neolithic, third millennium BC pre-Kerma site on Sai Island, and prehistoric finds in general are scarce. Interestingly, an analysis of phytoliths from plant deposi...
Chapter
This paper presents the results of ethnographic observations of non-mechanized crop-processing activities at two localities in Catalonia (Spain). The aim of the study is to analyze the patterns of phytolith deposition on threshing floors and to be able to reconstruct them. Phytoliths are extremely durable plant micro-remains that are commonly found...
Article
Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv. (foxtail millet) was originally domesticated in northern China. The time and route of its introduction into South Asia is currently unclear due to the possible confusion with autochthonous Brachiaria ramosa (L.) Stapf. (browntop millet). Geometric morphometrics (GM) offer an alternative to traditional archaeobotanical...
Article
The term “millets” is used to identify several genera of grasses (Poaceae), most of which belong to the subfamily Panicoideae. Millets are one of the major food sources in arid and semi-arid areas of the world and they have been important crops in the prehistory of Africa and Eurasia. In this paper, we discuss phytoliths and starch grains from two...
Article
Full-text available
Although cereals are among the most important staple foods worldwide, we know little about how they were prepared for consumption in prehistoric times. That is wh international experts on macrobotanical remains (seeds, fruits etc.), microfossils (starch granules and phytoliths), and on use-wear analysis morphotechnology of grinding devices were inv...
Data
The study of the technology underlying pre-industrial storage structures has an interest from an anthropological and archaeological perspective, in terms of the evolution of key cultural and cognitive capabilities, often related to the transition to food production. Microarchaeological techniques offer a unique perspective on the study of pre-indus...
Article
Full-text available
The study of the technology underlying pre-industrial storage structures has an interest from an anthropological and archaeological perspective, in terms of the evolution of key cultural and cognitive capabilities, often related to the transition to food production. Microarchaeological techniques offer a unique perspective on the study of pre-indus...
Thesis
Full-text available
Understanding how human societies adapted to past environmental and climatic variability is fundamental to face present and future climatic events, particularly in highly vulnerable arid and semi-arid regions. Northern Gujarat (northwestern India) is a semi-arid ecotone where high intra- and inter-annual precipitation variability has a great impact...
Article
Full-text available
The integrated analysis of several proxies in order to answer a research question is a widespread approach in palaeoecology, but it is not well developed in archaeobotanical research. Applying a multi-proxy approach to archaeobotany has several advantages: a more diverse anatomical and taxonomical representation of the original plant input and a be...
Technical Report
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The 2012 NoGAP fieldwork in northern Gujarat (India) has been carried out through the sixth and seventh field seasons, based on a cooperation agreement between the Institució Milà i Fontanals and the MS University of Baroda. Specifically, the campaigns took place btween 11th February and 12th March 2013, and between 19th Aprl and 26th April 2013. T...
Article
Full-text available
Loteshwar (23º 36ʹ 1.8ʺ N; 71º 50ʹ 11.8ʺ E) is situated in the Sami Taluka of Patan District in North Gujarat, Western India. First excavated in 1990’s the site was re-excavated by the North Gujarat Archaeological Project during November/December 2009. The 2009 excavation unearthed two cultural periods namely Mesolithic (dated between the end of th...
Article
Full-text available
The study of plant exploitation and early use of cereals in Africa has seen over the years a great input from charred and desiccated macrobotanical remains. This paper presents the results of one of the few examples in Africa of microbotanical analyses. Three grave contexts of phytolith-rich deposits and the dental calculus of 20 individuals were a...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper describes the results of osteological studies on a sub-adult human skeleton found at Vaharvo Timbo in Ranod Village in Sami Taluka of the Patan District, Gujarat, belonging to the Chalcolithic period (3000-2600 BCE). The skeleton has been kept partially embedded in a block of soil, as it will be for display in the museum. Hence, a...
Article
In Central Asia, the introduction of mechanised farming and the transformation of the landscape caused by agricultural intensification over the last 50 years have resulted in the massive destruction of archaeological remains. In this paper, we focus on an underestimated and unexploited type of remote sensing for the study of landscape change and an...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The fifth NoGAP fieldwork season was carried out between November and December 2011 in North Gujarat (India). For the 2011 fieldwork season there was the need of acquiring further data on the archaeology from the Holocene deposits, with a special focus on the record before the 5000 BC bracket, which testifies to the earliest occupation of this area...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The archaeological study conducted in North Gujarat by the NoGAP project has revealed the existence of dozens of archaeological sites of hunter-gatherer and agro-pastoral groups as well as farmers of the Harappan Civilization. This are,a “peripheral” to the Indus Civilisation, has great potential for understanding the strategies of resource use thr...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The third work campaign of the NoGAP project has centered its primary work in three aspects: the excavation of the Loteshwar site, which develops a methodology of holistic and broad spectrum samples, as well as graphically documenting the stratigraphy of the excavation through different techniques of high resolution centimetrics; the geoarcheologic...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
http://culm.weebly.com/english-version.html
Project
The North Gujarat Archaeological Project (NoGAP) was born form a collaboration between the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology of the Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF-CSIC) and the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History of the M. S. University of Baroda (Gujarat, India). This project aims at understanding how the inhabitants of North Gujarat managed natural resources during the Early and Middle Holocene, approximately between 9000 and 4000 years ago, as well as possible environmental shifts that may have affected these populations. Fieldwork started in 2007 and thenceforth we have carried out different investigations, from the excavation of archaeological sites (Loteshwar in 2009, Datrana in 2010 and Vaharvo Timbo in 2011) to the study of environmental sequences from a geoarchaeological perspective. During the past few years we have also studied farming and nomad traditional communities, we have created a reference collection of modern plants and we have carried out a systematic archaeological survey at a regional level to determine North Gujarat's archaeological heritage.
Project
The CUISINE project aims at developing an innovative methodology for the study of culinary practices (cuisine) in past societies through the integrated analysis of phytoliths, starch grains and lipids from cooking pottery. In order to interpret the archaeological record, extensive plant reference collections and several experiments will be developed as part of the project. At the same time, the methods developed during the experimentation phase will be tested and validated on two archaeological case studies in the Aegean: Neolithic Stavroupoli (ca. 5600-5000 cal. BC) and Bronze Age Knossos-Gypsades (ca. 3650-1100 cal. BC). The development of these integrated analyses on Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements will allow for the study of the emergence of new social practices and cultural identities linked to the origins of food production and the development of urban societies. Moreover, this project will bring plants into the picture on the basis of full-spectrum residue analyses from archaeological pottery. Plants and animals are often cooked (and consumed) together (e.g. the combination of dairy and cereals to prepare dishes such as trahanas, the use of spices to flavour up a stew, etc.). Thus, the combination of techniques/approaches proposed in this project will eliminate the methodological bias that has overemphasised the role of meat products and byproducts on prehistoric cuisine.