Juan Ignacio Gómez González

Juan Ignacio Gómez González
Universidad de Cádiz | UCA · INMAR - Instituto de Investigaciones Marítimas

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Publications (3)
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This project focuses on the analysis and critical review of a characteristic type of deposits located in the city of Gadir (Cádiz), known in the scientific literature as “ritual wells”. They are underground structures that appear clogged with materials and organic remains as a result of the celebration of different ritual acts. The main objective i...
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En este trabajo se analiza la incidencia del factor visibilidad en la configuración del paisaje arcaico de la ciudad fenicia de Gadir (Cádiz, Sur de España) utilizando como referencia los tres núcleos urbanos fenicios hasta hoy día hallados en la Bahía gaditana y su relación con los santuarios que citan las fuentes clásicas. Se aplica el método de...
Article
Full-text available
This work analyses the influence of the visibility factor on the configuration of the archaic landscape of the Phoenician city of Gadir (Cadiz, Southern Spain) using the three shrines mentioned by classic sources as a reference. Theoretical or cumulative viewshed analyses are the methods used to investigate the visibility relationships each of the...

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Projects (2)
Project
This project analyses the social impact of the landing of the Carthaginian general Hamilcar Barca on Gadir in 237 BC, as well as the influence exerted in a pre-war and war context, between the later “occupation” of the Phoenician city by the North African army and the defeat of Gadir in 206 BC. The arrival of such substantial forces, although they were supposedly “friends” and “allies”, should necessarily have both quantitative and qualitative consequences on the social balance of Gadir. Two factors in particular must be taken into account when examining these decades: 1) a remarkable increase of population in a city with limited space and 2) the forced cohabitation between the inhabitants of Gadir and people of various ethnic and social backgrounds, who had their own religious practices and beliefs and were mainly male members of an army waiting to go into action. Although textual evidence is available on these stages, the sources regard mainly very specific aspects and events leading up to the Second Punic War, with little reference to the social context of a “de facto” occupied city. The silence of the written sources notwithstanding, archaeology does provide evidence suggesting that the interaction between the local population and the Carthaginian army was not without conflict and allowing us to investigate strategies for channelling those social tensions. In particular, we suggest including the “ritual wells” among the religious responses to the social tension occurring during the second half of the 3rd century BC. This peculiar ritual practice, indeed, is currently attested at Gadir only during this time span and it is likely to be connected to these “times of crisis”. Using a multidisciplinary methodological approach, our project aims at analysing these architectural structures (i.e. the wells) and the ritual performed inside them, with special emphasis on the most characteristic sacrifices, those of the canids, but considering also other animal species (e.g. Suidae, malacofauna, etc.) and the extraordinary occurrence of human skeletal remains. This study will be also extended to the other material and organic evidence that is useful to defining and interpreting the various ritual actions taking place inside the wells. However, the project will take into account also further paths of research. First of all, it aims at defining role, ethnicity, social status and gender of those taking part in these rituals (i.e. promoters and participants). Secondly, it will investigate the possible meaning of these rituals, as well as the dialectical relationship between the collective habitus and the individual agency of the cult operators, who perform a ritual that, although it was regulated and programmed, remains dynamic and continually in progress. Finally, adopting the theoretical-conceptual framework of the so-called "Archaeology of Gesture", we aim at establishing the ritual “operational sequence", so as to determine all ritual actions and consider also immaterial components of the ceremony (e.g. dramatization, music, dances, etc.).