Juan L Cantalapiedra

Juan L Cantalapiedra
University of Alcalá | UAH · Department of Life Sciences

PhD in Biology (UCM, Madrid)

About

95
Publications
24,174
Reads
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692
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - March 2022
University of Alcalá
Position
  • Senior Researcher
August 2017 - March 2018
Museum für Naturkunde - Leibniz Institute for Research on Evolution and Biodiversity
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research project funded by the German Research Foundation [DFG]
May 2015 - April 2017

Publications

Publications (95)
Article
Full-text available
Proboscideans were keystone Cenozoic megaherbivores and present a highly relevant case study to frame the timing and magnitude of recent megafauna extinctions against long-term macroevolutionary patterns. By surveying the entire proboscidean fossil history using model-based approaches, we show that the dramatic Miocene explosion of proboscidean fun...
Article
The study of deep-time ecological dynamics has the ability to inform conservation decisions by anticipating the behavior of ecosystems millions of years into the future. Using network analysis and an exceptional fossil dataset spanning the past 21 million years, we show that mammalian ecological assemblages undergo long periods of functional stasis...
Article
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Evolutionary theory has long proposed a connection between trait evolution and diversification rates. In this work, we used phylogenetic methods to evaluate the relationship of lineage-specific speciation rates and the mode of evolution of body size and tooth morphology in the Neogene and Quaternary radiation of horses (7 living and 131 extinct spe...
Article
Alternative prioritization strategies have been proposed to safeguard biodiversity over macro-evolutionary timescales. The first prioritizes the most distantly related species (maximizing phylogenetic diversity) in the hopes of capturing at least some lineages that will successfully diversify into the future. The second prioritizes lineages that ar...
Article
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It is often claimed that conserving evolutionary history is more efficient than species‐based approaches for capturing the attributes of biodiversity that benefit people. This claim underpins academic analyses and recommendations about the distribution and prioritization of species and areas for conservation, but evolutionary history is rarely cons...
Article
The resource‐use hypothesis, proposed by E.S. Vrba, states that habitat fragmentation caused by climatic oscillations would affect particularly biome specialists (species inhabiting only one biome), which might show higher speciation and extinction rates than biome generalists. If true, lineages would accumulate biome‐specialist species. This effec...
Article
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Trophic niche breadth plays a key role in biogeographic distribution patterns. Theory posits that generalist strategies are favoured in a more heterogeneous set of environments across a spatio-temporal gradient of resources predictability, conferring individuals and species a greater capacity for colonising new habitats and thus expanding their dis...
Article
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During the latest Cretaceous, the European Archipelago was characterized by highly fragmented landmasses hosting putative dwarfed, insular dinosaurs, claimed as fossil evidence of the “island rule”. The Villaggio del Pescatore quarry (north-eastern Italy) stands as the most informative locality within the palaeo-Mediterranean region and represents...
Conference Paper
The latest Cretaceous Adriatic Carbonate Platform (AdCP) system in the paleo-Mediterranean area stands as one of the most complex and debated topics related to the evolution of land vertebrates in the area surrounding the Tethys Sea. Italy holds the sole Late Cretaceous dinosaur-dominated site of the AdCP, namely the Villaggio del Pescatore localit...
Article
The apparently regular and favourable climate that characterizes the Holocene as an interglacial period shows, however, important climatic instability well documented in the Northern Hemisphere. These fluctuations from colder to warmer or wetter to drier affected both biodiversity and human societies in the last 12,000 years, although the impact in...
Article
1. The shape of the tree of life is the result of shifting diversification rates, and identifying the factors driving these shifts is one of the main aims in evolutionary biology. Various biotic and abiotic factors have been proposed to have an impact on mammal diversification, such as climatic and tectonic changes, the acquisition of new traits, a...
Conference Paper
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The relationship between past climatic events and evolutionary processes at a broad-scale has an outstanding significance to understand current diversity. Similarly, processes related to the retention of ancestral ecological traits (Phylogenetic Niche Conservatism) aim to explain many geographical distribution patterns in relatively recent times. H...
Article
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We perform a phylogenetic analysis to test the affinities of 'Dorcatherium' from Arrisdrift (early middle Miocene, Sperrgebiet, Namibia). Our results show Arrisdrift 'Dorcatherium' included in a clade of Miocene African forms that also contains 'D.' pigotti and 'D.' iririensis. This clade is not related to the true Dorcatherium-clade which includes...
Article
Through elasmobranch (sharks and rays) evolutionary history, gigantism evolved multiple times in phylogenetically distant species, some of which are now extinct. Interestingly, the world's largest elasmobranchs display two specializations found never to overlap: filter feeding and mesothermy. The contrasting lifestyles of elasmobranch giants provid...
Article
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Despite extensive research on ecological community compositions, general patterns across large-scale environmental gradients have remained unclear. A widely used explanatory model is the stress dominance hypothesis (SDH), predicting that the relative influence of environmental filtering is greater in stressful habitats while competition is more imp...
Article
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Abstract The reconstruction of deep-time diversity trends is key to understanding current and future species richness. Studies that statistically evaluate potential factors affecting paleodiversity have focused on continental and global, clade-wide datasets, and thus we ignore how community species richness build-up to generate large-scale patterns...
Conference Paper
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Birds are one of the most species groups of terrestrial vertebrates inhabit all the biomes on Earth. During early bird diversification, the prominent flying capacity was related without doubt to the development of this adaptive and ecological success. According to the evolutionary process in each bird taxa, this trait allowed that early birds reach...
Conference Paper
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The resource-use hypothesis developed by Vrba predicts that specialist species have higher speciation and extinction rates than generalist ones, due to their higher susceptibility to resource restriction, which makes them more sensitive to environmental change, vicariance and directional selection. Here, we present the first test of the resource-us...
Conference Paper
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The study of how long-term changes affect metacommunities is a relevant topic, which involves the evaluation of connections among biological assemblages across different spatio-temporal scales, in order to fully understand links between global changes and macroevolutionary patterns. We applied multivariate statistical analyses and diversity tests u...
Article
Corral de Lobato, a karstic site in the area of Molina de Aragón has been studied in a preliminary way. Even though there are not many Neogene karstic sites in the Iberian Chain, they occur in four clusters, with ages ranging from latest middle Miocene (MN7/8) to early Pleistocene (MN17). Correlations between these clusters and the reference strati...
Article
Full-text available
The study of how long-term changes affect metacommunities is a relevant topic, that involves the evaluation of connections among biological assemblages across different spatio-temporal scales, in order to fully understand links between global changes and macroevolutionary patterns. We applied multivariate statistical analyses and diversity tests us...
Article
Full-text available
We developed new quantitative palaeoclimatic inference models based on the body-size structure of mammal faunas from the Old World tropics and applied them to the Somosa-guas fossil site (middle Miocene, central Iberian Peninsula). Twenty-six mammal species have been described at this site, including proboscideans, ungulates, carnivores, insecti-vo...
Conference Paper
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Living rhinoceros’ species are but a vestige of the great diversity that the Family Rhinocerotidae attained during the Cenozoic. We present an overview of the diversification patterns of the Rhinocerotina (Family Rhinocerotidae), with emphasis on the potential influence of sampling biases. We conducted a taxonomic review of the group, including an...
Conference Paper
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The roles of environmental and biotic factors in shaping diversity has been mainly assessed at large evolutionary and taxonomic scales, generally looking at entire clades and continental species pools. We investigate the influence of competition, functional diversity, local and global environmental changes, as well as biogeographic events on the di...
Article
Debris-flow hosted assemblages dominated by mammalian remains are very scarce in the fossil record and few examples are reported. Herein we present a detailed taphonomic study of Somosaguas-North (Madrid Basin, Spain), a Middle Miocene mammalian-dominated site embedded in debris-flow deposits, in order to increase our knowledge of themode of format...
Conference Paper
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Biomechanics and forces as well as properties of teeth are demonstrated to be crucial to understand diet, dental functional traits and evolution in primates. In this work, biomechanics of extant and extinct primate jaws during chewing were analysed using a classical two-dimensional lever approach. First, we aim to test for correlation between indic...
Conference Paper
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Xenarthra is an American clade that was widespread in the past whose diversity has been greatly reduced, being now represented only by sloths, anteaters and armadillos. Armadillos are the most diverse group of extant xenarthrans, with more than 30 species included in 3 subfamilies. The objective of this work was to explore the eco-variation between...
Conference Paper
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Carnivorans are a highly diversified group that shows adaptations to many different ecological niches. Despite the relationship between jaw shape and biomechanics has been thoroughly studied in the past, no study has analysed both characteristics in an evolutionary framework using Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) together with Geometric Morphometrics...
Article
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Palaeomerycids were strange three-horned Eurasian Miocene ruminants known through fossils from Spain to China. We here study their systematics, offering the first cladistic phylogeny of the best-known species of the group, and also reassess their phylogenetic position among ruminants, which is currently disputed. The beautifully preserved remains o...
Article
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Computational methods for estimating diversification rates from extant species phylogenetic trees have become abundant in evolutionary research. However, little evidence exists about how their outcome compares to a complementary and direct source of information: the fossil record. Furthermore, there is virtually no direct test for the congruence of...
Article
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Carnivore mammals (Carnivora, Mammalia) constitute a significant component of the Spanish Neogene faunas, not so much due to their fossil abundance, which is generally low, but rather because of their high degree of taxonomic diversity. We assessed their evolutionary dynamics from the fossil record of Iberian carnivores using per-taxon rates of ori...
Article
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Comprehension of changes in community composition through multiple spatio-temporal scales is a prime challenge in ecology and palaeobiology. However, assembly, struc-turing and disassembly of biotic metacommunities in deep-time is insufficiently known. To address this, we used the extensively sampled Iberian Plio-Pleistocene fossil record of rodent...
Conference Paper
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The migratory behavior is a prominent feature for many bird lineages, and its study is very important for achieve a better understanding of their evolutionary processes. Our findings suggest a macroevolutionary framework which for some lineages, the migration plays an important role as a strategy that promotes occupancy and diversification of birds...
Conference Paper
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La hipótesis del uso de los recursos propone un escenario macroevolutivo que conecta ecología (grado de especialización en la ocupación de biomas), cambios climáticos a gran escala y eventos de especiación y extinción. En este trabajo se evalúa la validez de esta hipótesis para todas las especies de aves no paseriformes (N = 3951). Nuestra aproxima...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
From their origin in the Middle Jurassic until the present, birds have undergone one of the most important evolutionary radiations among vertebrates, with the development of great species-level diversity and the occupation of a broad spectrum of ecological niches. Since dietary shifts involve a series of morphophysiological adjustments and reflect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
From their origin in the Middle Jurassic until the present, birds have undergone one of the most important evolutionary radiations among vertebrates, with the development of great species-level diversity and the occupation of a broad spectrum of ecological niches. Since dietary shifts involve a series of morphophysiological adjustments and reflect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The late Miocene brought about the aridification of most of the Mediterranean environments. Nevertheless, the Vallès-Penedès basin (Catalonia, Spain), escaped this harshening and held humid and forest-adapted faunas until around 9.6 Ma. By combining large datasets of macro- (817 localities and 99 genera) and micromammals (456 localities and 107 gen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
From their origin in the Middle Jurassic until the present, birds have undergone one of the most important evolutionary radiations among vertebrates, with the development of great species-level diversity and the occupation of a broad spectrum of ecological niches. Since dietary shifts involve a series of morphophysiological adjustments and reflect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The effect of climate change on extant mammal faunas is a frequent topic in ecological research and the analysis of past mammalian communities and their correlated evolution with global climatic change can provide data relevant to this question. Late Pleistocene and Holocene carnivore mammal faunas from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits (Los Angeles, CA)...
Article
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Deep-time perspectives in macroecology are essential with regard to understanding the impact of climate forcing on faunal communities. Using late Miocene rodent faunas (12 to 5 Ma) from two different biogeographical provinces from southwestern Europe, we asked whether the waxing and waning of faunas with dissimilar ecological affinities tracked cli...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing availability of published evolutionary trees and phylogenetic methods has changed the way we tackle the study of evolution. In this sense, ruminants have become one paradigmatic object of study due to their ecological variety and well-known evolutionary history. The last decades of ruminant research have benefited from diverse phylog...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Vrba's resource-use hypothesis and related habitat-theory suggest that a key to present-day macroecological patterns is found in the past: in the history of turnover of clades (speciation, extinction), and in the paleoclimatic and other geological changes of the areas in which clades evolved. We test several subsidiary predictions of the resource-u...