Joyce Weeland

Joyce Weeland
Erasmus University Rotterdam | EUR · Erasmus school of Social and Behavioural Sciences

About

34
Publications
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378
Citations
Introduction
Joyce Weeland currently works at the Erasmus school of Social and Behavioural Sciences at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
In a randomized controlled trial, the Observational Randomized Controlled Trial of Childhood Differential Susceptibility (ORCHIDS study), we tested whether observed parental affect and observed and reported parenting behavior are mechanisms of change underlying the effects of the behavioral parent training program the Incredible Years (IY). Further...
Preprint
Sexual and dating violence (SDV) by male youth (> 25 years) –including sexual harassment, emotional partner violence and rape– is a worldwide problem. The goal of this preregistered (PROSPERO, ID: CRD42022281220) systematic review was to map existing SDV prevention programs aimed at male youth, including their characteristics (e.g., content, intens...
Article
Caregivers are often encouraged to praise children to reduce externalizing behavior. Although several theoretical perspectives suggest that praise works (e.g., praise reinforces positive behavior), others suggest it may not (e.g., children dismiss praise or experience it as controlling). This longitudinal-observational study examined whether (a) ca...
Article
Behavioral parenting programs are a theory-driven and evidence-based approach for reducing disruptive child behavior. Although these programs are effective on average, they are not equally effective in all families. Decades of moderation research has yielded very few consistent moderators, and we therefore still have little knowledge of who benefit...
Preprint
Caregivers are often encouraged to praise children to reduce externalizing behavior. Although several theoretical perspectives suggest that praise works (e.g., praise reinforces positive behavior), others suggest it may not (e.g., children dismiss praise or experience it as controlling). This longitudinal-observational study examined whether (1) ca...
Article
Full-text available
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 a pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic brought about worldwide challenges and had a profound impact on family dynamics, relationships, and routines. At the same time, the impact may differ largely due to regional differences in the numbers of infections and severity of pr...
Preprint
Full-text available
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 a pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic brought about worldwide challenges and had a profound impact on family dynamics, relationships and routines. At the same time, the impact may differ largely due to regional differences in the numbers of infections and severity of pre...
Article
Full-text available
Many established parenting programs for children's conduct problems are delivered in groups. Various, and at times conflicting, beliefs exist about whether families fare better in groups with parents that are more similar to them, or in groups that are more diverse. We set out to test these beliefs empirically. We integrated data from four trials o...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral parent training (BPT) is a theory‐driven, evidence‐based, and widely used intervention strategy for preventing and decreasing children's disruptive behavior problems, indirectly via improved parenting behavior. However, not all families benefit equally from BPT. To date, our knowledge of who benefits (and who does not) and our understand...
Article
Full-text available
Conduct problems can develop into behavior disorders and put children at risk for other mental health problems. Parenting interventions have been shown to successfully reduce conduct problems and are often expected to prevent the development of broader mental health problems. Few studies have evaluated the longer-term and broader effects of these i...
Article
The effectiveness of a 10-session social problem-solving training (SPST) was evaluated in two independent studies in a juvenile justice (JJ) setting. In both studies, we aimed to examine main intervention effects on social problem-solving skills and recidivism, as well as differential effects as modulated by anger, anger regulation, and single nucl...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Accumulating research provides support for differential susceptibility, which holds that the same children who are most vulnerable to adversity, such as negative parenting, may also benefit most from enriched environments, such as positive parenting. This “for better and for worse” phenomenon is believed to be rooted in endogenous, biolo...
Article
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This article provides an overview of the contributions to the special issue on Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in Clinical and Community Settings: Challenges, Alternatives, and Supplementary Designs. The article introduces the challenges of conducting RCTs in dynamic real‐world settings and outlines the need to consider alternative and suppleme...
Article
Children vary in the extent to which they benefit from parenting programs for conduct problems. How does parental mental health change if children benefit less or more? We assessed whether changes in conduct problems and maternal depressive symptoms co-occur following participation in the Incredible Years parenting program. We integrated individual...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing evidence that exposure to nature, as opposed to a built environment, is associated with better health. Specifically in children, more exposure to nature seems to be associated with better cognitive, affective, and behavioral self-regulation. Because studies are scattered over different scientific disciplines, it is difficult to cre...
Article
Full-text available
We tested whether neighborhood greenness is a promotive and/or a protective factor in the development of adolescent externalizing behavior problems and explored a possible mechanism of its effects via respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) recovery after stress. Data from a longitudinal multi-method study on adolescents (N = 715) was used. Result showe...
Article
Objective: Families with disruptive child behavior are typically referred to services based on children's behavior alone, rather than on underlying mechanisms of disruptive behavior. Yet, the presence of the precise mechanisms targeted by services might be essential for intervention success. We integrated person- and variable-centered approaches t...
Article
In their commentary, Beauchaine and Slep (2018) raise important issues regarding research on behavioral parenting training (BPT). In this reply we highlight key points of agreement and respond to issues that we feel require clarification. BPT has been repeatedly proven effective in decreasing disruptive child behavior (also in the work of our resea...
Article
Deze studie onderzoekt of de preventieve variant van de ouderinterventie Pittige Jaren (in het Engels The Incredible Years; IY) effectief is in het verminderen van externaliserende gedragsproblemen en of veronderstelde moderatoren (d.w.z., ernst van probleemgedrag bij aanvang van de interventie, geslacht kind, sociaaleconomische status, gezinssamen...
Article
Full-text available
The Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) is one of the most widely used and well-validated parent rating scales for children’s disruptive behavior. This screening instrument is a short, targetted and easy to implement inventory with good psychometric properties and is normed for different countries, among which the United States, Spain, Sweden an...
Article
‘De Beeldschermgeneratie beweegt niet meer!’ ‘Onderwijs past niet bij ontwikkeling van jongens’ ‘ADHD’ers en autisten lopen vast in het reguliere onderwijs’ Dit soort koppen, die dagelijks in elke willekeurige krant in binnen- en buitenland zouden kunnen verschijnen, geven blijk van de vele maatschappelijke en onderwijskundige uitdagingen waar lee...
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Full-text available
This study examined parent-observer discrepancies in assessments of negative child behavior and negative parenting behavior to shed more light on correlates with these discrepancies. Specifically, we hypothesized that informant discrepancy between observers and parents on child behavior would be larger when parents reported high levels of negative...
Article
When interacting with other people, both children’s biological predispositions and past experiences play a role in how they will process and respond to social–emotional cues. Children may partly differ in their reactions to such cues because they differ in the threshold for perceiving such cues in general. Theoretically, perceptual sensitivity (i.e...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated whether children scoring higher on a polygenic plasticity index based on five dopaminergic genes (DRD4, DRD2, DAT1, MAOA, and COMT) benefited the most from the Incredible Years (IY) parent program. Data were used from a randomized controlled trial including 341 Dutch families with 4- to 8-year-old children (55.7% boys) showi...
Article
We tested the effectiveness of the preventive behavioral parent training (BPT) The Incredible Years (IY) and the independent effects of previously suggested sociodemographic and intervention-based moderator variables (i.e., initial severity of externalizing problem behavior, child gender, social economic status, family composition, and number of se...
Article
‘Een verspilling van belastinggeld’, zo noemde het National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH, een van Amerika’s grootste subsidieverstrekkers) studies naar psychopathologie die gebruikmaken van kandidaat-genen. De term kandidaat-gen heeft betrekking op enkele genen die mogelijk direct, en/of in interactie met de omgeving, in verband staan met psych...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, several candidate genes (i.e., MAOA, DRD4, DRD2, DAT1, 5-HTTLPR, and COMT) have been extensively studied as potential moderators of the detrimental effects of postnatal family adversity on child externalizing behaviors, such as aggression and conduct disorder. Many studies on such candidate gene by environment interactions (i....
Article
Full-text available
Background There is increasing evidence that variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 (i.e., the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism) moderates the impact of environmental stressors on child psychopathology. Emotional reactivity −the intensity of an individual’s response to other’s emotions− has been put forward as a possible mec...
Article
Gene by environment (G x E) research has been increasingly appreciated as it relates to the development of psychopathology. In particular, interactions between dopaminergic genotypes and maladaptive parenting have been prominently in the spotlight. In this study, we investigated whether high parental psychological control and low support would be d...
Article
Full-text available
The main public health advantages of examining gene by environment interactions (i.e., G × E) in externalizing behavior lie in the realm of personalized interventions. Nevertheless, the incorporation of genetic data in randomized controlled trials is fraught with difficulties and raises ethical questions. This paper has been written from the perspe...
Article
Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential imp...
Article
Full-text available
The insightful overview by Sir Michael Rutter (this issue) on gene–environment interdependence comes about 10 years after the breakthrough Science publications on gene–environment interactions (G×E) involving the MAOA and 5-HTT genes by Caspi et al. (2002, 2003). Since then, a field of research has burgeoned that has produced replications as well a...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am conducting a latent profile analyses in Mplus. However, missing data on the indicator variables are not missing at random. I read that listwise deletion and FIML are not suitable when data is not missing at random. Normally I would control for the variables which predict missing data. However, I do not want to include these variables in my profile analysis since they are not indicators.
What is my best option here?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Severe disruptive behavior problems in childhood predict psychopathology across the lifespan and have tremendous social and economic costs. Effects of our standard practice, Behavioral Parenting Training (BPT), are modest at best and vary immensely between families. Moreover, a large group of families (up to 80%) does not seem to benefit from BPT at all. These statistics show that we are not treating children’s disruptive behavior successfully. Currently, families are referred to BPT based on children’s behavioral symptoms (i.e., disruptive behavior) instead of the etiology of these symptoms (e.g., impulsivity, coercive parent-child interactions). This leads to large heterogeneity in families receiving BPT, specifically in the etiology of problems. In medicine it is universally accepted that treatment strategies improve when the etiology of a specific patient is understood and more directly targeted. It is therefore surprising that in child psychology/pedagogics, we still work on a “one size fits all” basis. Moreover, our traditional variable-centered research methods−assuming homogenous relations between variables across families−are not equipped to deal with large heterogeneity in samples. Moving towards more personalized intervention strategies is the biggest upcoming challenge in intervention research. For this, I propose we radically change the way we assess “what works for whom (moderation) and why (mediation)”. By using a person-centered approach and capitalizing on technological and statistical innovations I aim to quantify and explain the complexity of differential effectiveness of BPT. The Profile study will combine the strengths of large-scaled pooled data with novel, fine-grained single-subject designs to: identify etiological profiles of families receiving BPT; assess which family profiles benefit most; and disentangle the mechanisms driving/preventing change in different family profiles. This new knowledge will possibly help us understand differential effectiveness, use our evidence-based programs more efficiently, move towards a more precise, personalized intervention strategy, and more successfully treat disruptive child behavior.
Project
Within the next 10 years up to 70% of children worldwide will grow up in cities. However, we know relatively little about the possible risks of growing up in such urban (vs. rural or greener) environments. Correlational research on adults suggests that a natural “green” environment (hereafter called nature) has beneficial effects on (mental) health. This implies that an urban environment might have aversive affects, specifically on core components of externalizing psychopathology such as deficits in attention, affect and self-regulation. However, clear-cut experimental evidence for the potential benefits of nature on child development does not exist. The literature is scattered over different disciplines and has important limitations concerning causality and generalizability to children. Moreover, we know even less about how nature might benefit child development (the underlying mechanisms). Thus, we are in need of a new research paradigm for testing effects of nature (vs. an urban environment) on externalizing psychopathology in children, as well as of how this works (e.g., by decreasing deficits in attention and self-regulation). This research paradigm should encompass a triangulation of research strategies including a meta-analysis, longitudinal data, and experimental studies.
Archived project
A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-environment interactions to obtain more insight into a) moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b) behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-environment interactions in an experimental design. The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training). Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest), after 6 months (i.e., posttest), and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up).