Joshua Zonca

Joshua Zonca
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia | IIT · COgNiTive Architecture for Collaborative Technologies (CONTACT)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

22
Publications
2,947
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
111
Citations

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Many types of social interaction require the ability to anticipate others' behavior, which is commonly referred to as strategic sophistication. In this context, observational learning can represent a decisive tool for behavioral adaptation. However, little is known on whether and when individuals learn from observation in interactive settings. In t...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are constantly influenced by others’ behavior and opinions. Importantly, social influence among humans is shaped by reciprocity: we follow more the advice of someone who has been taking into consideration our opinions. In the current work, we investigate whether reciprocal social influence can emerge while interacting with a social humanoid...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Trust is one of the hallmarks of human-human and human-robot interaction. Extensive evidence has shown that trust among humans requires reciprocity. Conversely, research in human-robot interaction (HRI) has mostly relied on a unidirectional view of trust that focuses on robots' reliability and performance. The current paper argues that reciprocity...
Article
Full-text available
Human decisions are often influenced by others' opinions. This process is regulated by social norms: for instance, we tend to reciprocate the consideration received from others, independently of their reliability as information sources. Nonetheless, no study to date has investigated whether and how reciprocity modulates social influence in child–ad...
Preprint
Human decisions are often influenced by other’s opinions. This process is regulated by social norms: for instance, we tend to reciprocate the consideration received from others, independently of their reliability as information sources. Nonetheless, no study to date has investigated whether and how reciprocity modulates social influence in child-ad...
Preprint
Trust is essential for sustaining cooperation among humans. The same principle applies during interaction with computers and robots: if we do not trust them, we will not accept help from them. Extensive evidence has shown that our trust in other agents depends on their performance. However, in uncertain environments, humans may not be able to estim...
Preprint
Research now published in iScience, cite as: Zonca, J., Folsø, A., & Sciutti, A. (2021). The role of reciprocity in human-robot social influence. iScience, 24(12), 103424. 10.1016/j.isci.2021.103424 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S258900422101395X
Article
Full-text available
Indirect reciprocity is a pervasive social norm that promotes human cooperation. Helping someone establishes a good reputation, increasing the probability of receiving help from others. Here we hypothesize that indirect reciprocity regulates not only cooperative behavior but also the exchange of opinions within a social group. In a novel interactiv...
Article
Full-text available
In early deaf individuals, the auditory deprived temporal brain regions become engaged in visual processing. In our study we tested further the hypothesis that intrinsic functional specialization guides the expression of cross-modal responses in the deprived auditory cortex. We used functional MRI to characterize the brain response to horizontal, r...
Preprint
Full-text available
In early deaf individuals, the auditory deprived temporal brain regions become engaged in visual processing. In our study we tested further the hypothesis that intrinsic functional specialization guides the expression of cross-modal responses in the deprived auditory cortex. We used functional MRI to characterize the brain response to horizontal, r...
Article
Full-text available
In social contexts, we refer to strategic sophistication as the ability to adapt our own behavior based on the possible actions of others. In the current study, we explore the role of other-oriented attention and cognitive reflection in explaining heterogeneity in strategic sophistication. In two eye-tracking experiments, we registered eye movement...
Article
Full-text available
In our everyday life, we often need to anticipate the potential occurrence of events and their consequences. In this context, the way we represent contingencies can determine our ability to adapt to the environment. However, it is not clear how agents encode and organize available knowledge about the future to react to possible states of the world....
Article
Full-text available
We run an eye-tracking experiment to investigate whether players change their gaze patterns and choices after they experience alternative models of choice in one-shot games. In phase 1 and 3, participants play 2 × 2 matrix games with a human counterpart; in phase 2, they apply specific decision rules while playing with a computer with known behavio...
Preprint
Full-text available
We run an eye-tracking experiment to investigate whether players change their gaze patterns and choices after they experience alternative models of choice in one-shot games. In Phase 1 and 3, participants play 2x2 matrix games with a human counterpart, while in Phase 2 they are asked to apply specific decision rules while playing with a computer al...
Preprint
Full-text available
In social contexts, we refer to strategic sophistication as the ability to adapt our own behavior based on the possible actions of others. Growing experimental evidence has shown that players implement different levels of sophistication in games, as described by hierarchical models of strategic thinking such as Level-k and Cognitive Hierarchy. In t...
Preprint
In our everyday life, we often need to anticipate the potential occurrence of events and their consequences. In this context, the way we represent contingencies can determine our ability to adapt to the environment. However, it is not clear how agents encode and organize available knowledge about the future to react to possible states of the world....
Preprint
Full-text available
In our everyday life, we often need to anticipate the potential occurrence of events and their consequences. In this context, the way we represent contingencies can determine our ability to adapt to the environment. However, it is not clear how agents encode and organize available knowledge about the future to react to possible states of the world....
Preprint
In our everyday life, we often need to anticipate the potential occurrence of events and their respective consequences. In this context, the way we represent contingencies can determine our ability to adapt to the environment. However, it is not clear how agents encode and organize relevant information to react to possible states of the world. In t...
Article
Full-text available
Brain systems supporting face and voice processing both contribute to the extraction of important information for social interaction (e.g., person identity). How does the brain reorganize when one of these channels is absent? Here, we explore this question by combining behavioral and multimodal neuroimaging measures (magneto-encephalography and fun...
Preprint
Full-text available
Brain systems supporting face and voice processing both contribute to the extraction of important information for social interaction (e.g., person identity). How does the brain reorganize when one of these channels is absent? Here we explore this question by combining behavioral and multimodal neuroimaging measures (magneto-encephalography and func...

Network

Cited By