Joshua D. Weirick

Joshua D. Weirick
Purdue University | Purdue · Department of Linguistics

PhD. Student

About

5
Publications
557
Reads
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1
Citation
Introduction
My current research focuses on the effects of discourse-contextual variables on the processing of syntactic alternations in English, and investigates the processing of the dative alternation and heavy NP shift by monolingual native English speakers and English speaking bilinguals. Using internet- based acceptability judgement, forced preference, and self-paced reading tasks, I hope to provided new insights into the factors that influence sentence comprehension by monolingual and bilingual Englis
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - present
Purdue University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Courses: LING 201: Introduction to Linguistics
August 2015 - December 2015
Central Michigan University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Courses: ELI 181: Advanced Speaking and Listening (speaking CLB 8; listening CLB 8 & 9) (teaching assistant as part of MA TESOL practicum); ELI 184: Advanced writing (CLB 9 & 10) (teaching assistant as part of MA TESOL practicum).
August 2014 - May 2016
Central Michigan University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Writing tutor for undergraduate students, graduate students and distance learners; specialization in asynchronous online tutoring and tutoring non-native writers.
Education
August 2016 - May 2021
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Linguistics
August 2014 - May 2016
Central Michigan University
Field of study
  • TESOL
August 2010 - August 2014
Central Michigan University
Field of study
  • English Applied Linguistics

Publications

Publications (5)
Poster
Full-text available
Abstract: In English, subject-modifying restrictive relative clauses (RCs) are typically adjacent to their antecedents (e.g. some swimmers who had no adult supervision appeared), but can also be extraposed, appearing after the verb phrase (e.g. some swimmers appeared who had no adult supervision). Using informal judgments, Guéron (1980) and Rochemo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research [7], showed that Mandarin speakers of English modified acoustic properties of their English speech as a factor of both the interlocutor (native vs. non-native speakers of English) and their own attitudes towards Mandarin and English. The present study investigates whether these acoustic modifications are perceptible to native spea...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous research (Dmitrieva et al., 2015) showed that Mandarin speakers of English modified acoustic properties of their English speech as a factor of both the interlocutor (native vs. non-native speakers of English) and their own attitudes towards Mandarin and English. The present study investigates whether these acoustic modifications are percep...
Article
Full-text available
This case study examines the differences in comments offered by asynchronous online writing center consultants to L1 and L2 speakers and examines the potential disconnects in consultant perceptions of their practice. The researchers collected and coded sample papers and interviewed participants to contextualize data from the quantitative portion of...

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