Joshua Stevenson

Joshua Stevenson
University of Tasmania · School of Natural Sciences

BICT/BSc(Hons)
PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania. I am interested in algebraic approaches to evolutionary biology.

About

5
Publications
113
Reads
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3
Citations
Introduction
My research interests are in algebraic approaches to problems in evolutionary biology. In particular, my PhD project focuses on modelling genome rearrangements from an algebraic perspective.
Skills and Expertise
Education
January 2019 - December 2019
University of Tasmania
Field of study
  • Mathematical Biology
January 2015 - December 2018
University of Tasmania
Field of study
  • Software Development, Mathematics

Publications

Publications (5)
Preprint
Full-text available
The algebraic properties of flattenings and subflattenings provide direct methods for identifying edges in the true phylogeny -- and by extension the complete tree -- using pattern counts from a sequence alignment. The relatively small number of possible internal edges among a set of taxa (compared to the number of binary trees) makes these methods...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early literature on genome rearrangement modelling views the problem of computing evolutionary distances as an inherently combinatorial one. In particular, attention was given to estimating distances using the minimum number of events required to transform one genome into another. In hindsight, this approach is analogous to early methods for inferr...
Article
Of the many modern approaches to calculating evolutionary distance via models of genome rearrangement, most are tied to a particular set of genomic modeling assumptions and to a restricted class of allowed rearrangements. The “position paradigm”, in which genomes are represented as permutations signifying the position (and orientation) of each regi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Of the many modern approaches to calculating evolutionary distance via models of genome rearrangement, most are tied to a particular set of genomic modelling assumptions and to a restricted class of allowed rearrangements. The ``position paradigm'', in which genomes are represented as permutations signifying the position (and orientation) of each r...

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