Joshua Sbicca

Joshua Sbicca
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Sociology

PhD, Sociology

About

37
Publications
22,011
Reads
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496
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on food as a site of economic, political, and social struggle. My current work studies food systems and cultures and social movements at intersections of carcerality, gentrification, and racial capitalism. Underlying these interests is an ongoing engagement with how activists and scholars articulate and practice food justice and what this means for building broad based social movements.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Colorado State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
August 2010 - May 2014
University of Florida
Position
  • Instructor
Education
August 2010 - May 2014
University of Florida
Field of study
  • Sociology

Publications

Publications (37)
Book
Full-text available
Order: https://bit.ly/2rCkJOp The United States is a nation of foodies and food activists, many of them progressives, and yet their overwhelming concern for what they consume often hinders their engagement with social justice more broadly. Food Justice Now! charts a path from food activism to social justice activism that integrates the two. It cal...
Article
Full-text available
Food offers a visceral entry point into the politics and processes of gentrification. Traditional explanations of gentrification - when a neighborhood experiences disinvestment and economic decline followed by "revitalization" and "redevelopment" - hinge on either political economy or cultural drivers. This article discusses the relationship betwee...
Preprint
Full-text available
As a sustainability initiative with the backing of civil society, business, or government interests, urban agriculture can drive green gentrification even when advocates of these initiatives have the best of intentions and are aware of their exclusionary potential for urban farmers and residents. I investigate this more general pattern with the cas...
Book
Full-text available
Order: http://bitly.ws/8Z3L From hipster coffee shops to upscale restaurants, a bustling local food scene is perhaps the most commonly recognized harbinger of gentrification. A Recipe for Gentrification explores this widespread phenomenon, showing the ways in which food and gentrification are deeply—and, at times, controversially—intertwined. C...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture in the United States (US), long dominated by white male interests, is rooted in entrenched structural inequalities. Prominent among them is the power of growers over a dependable low-wage racialized and gendered workforce that is disciplined with the threat of their disposability. Workers and other activists have long responded with opp...
Chapter
From upscale restaurants to community gardens, food often reflects shifts in taste that are emblematic of gentrification. The prestige that food retail and urban agriculture can lend to a neighborhood helps to increase property values, fostering the displacement of long-term residents while shifting local culture to create new inclusions and exclus...
Chapter
When urban agriculture becomes a sustainability initiative with institutional backing, it can drive green gentrification even when its advocates are well intentioned and concerned about the possible exclusion of urban farmers and residents. This chapter explores these tensions through the notion of an urban agriculture fix , which I apply to a case...
Chapter
We have used a food intersections approach to explore the ways that gentrification is enacted and contested. Food and gentrification are certainly linked in the popular imagination; media coverage of gentrification often references food businesses like coffee shops, hip takes on working-class or ethnic cuisines, and urban farms as symbolic of a nei...
Article
Full-text available
Social network analysis (SNA) is an interdisciplinary method that takes as its starting point the premise that social life is created primarily and most importantly by relations and the patterns formed by these relations. While SNA is often associated with the quantitative analysis of network measures, we illustrate through our overall mapping of,...
Article
Full-text available
How do food movements prioritize and work to accomplish their varied and often conflicting social change goals at the city scale? Our study investigates the Denver food movement with a mixed methods social network analysis to understand how organizations navigate differences in power and influence vis-à-vis resource exchange. We refer to this uneve...
Article
Full-text available
Women in the US have farmed for centuries, but have infrequently had the farmer title. Rural sociologists have explored women’s on-farm roles, as well as rural conceptualizations of gender that influence who can be a farmer. As the proportion of women claiming the farmer title increases, it is important to explore women farmers’ experiences. This a...
Chapter
The formation of food-labor alliances in Los Angeles pushes food justice politics beyond a focus on food access, culturally appropriate food, and self-determination by strategically emphasizing economic inequalities and working conditions and engaging in confrontational politics. These alliances reveal that it is important to have highly visible la...
Article
Full-text available
Food justice scholarship utilizing racial formation theory has largely analyzed race and racism within the conventional food system and the food movement, leaving under-examined the political projects of food justice organizations to realize racial equity. This article recovers the dialectical spirit of racial formation theory, that of oppression a...
Article
Full-text available
Mass incarceration entrenches racial and class inequality and segregation. Before, during, and after low-income people of color enter prison, they experience a range of barriers and biases that make it difficult to break out of the prison pipeline. This article investigates food justice and restorative justice activists in Oakland, California who a...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers committed to food justice often enter communities and nonprofits with a desire to help. They often think there is a scarcity, such as food, that they want to understand and help to increase. At the same time, research obligations may lead to extracting "findings" without advancing food justice. Such actions may unintentionally work agai...
Article
Full-text available
The alternative food movement encounters many structural conditions as it strives toward more environmentally sustainable and socially just agrifood systems. One of the greatest challenges the movement faces is not turning its back on migrant farmworkers at the same time it creates and experiments with alternative agricultural models. This article...
Article
Full-text available
Much of the alternative food movement is predicated on a prefigurative politics of building alternatives to the conventional agrifood system, with only a smaller segment invested in a politics of confrontation with that very same system. In the context of actually existing agrifood relations, this raises a number of concerns. First, the movement of...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing commitment by different parts of the alternative food movement (AFM) to improve labor conditions for conventional food chain workers, and to develop economically fair alternatives, albeit under a range of conditions that structure mobilization. This has direct implications for the process of intra-movement building and therefore...
Article
Full-text available
Cities are a locus for struggles over the ability for historically marginalized groups to feed themselves. These stratified spaces represent a distinct expression of the conventional agrifood system: the undernutrition/malnutrition paradox. By investigating the food politics of two organizations – Food Not Bombs in Orlando, FL and People’s Grocery...
Article
Full-text available
We live in a contested, crisis-prone era, indicative of ongoing processes of neoliberalization. The most recent global financial and food crises have disproportionately impacted those already marginalized in society: people of colour and the working classes. The spatial expressions of this disproportionality are especially acute, evidenced by the u...
Article
Full-text available
http://www.uta.edu/huma/agger/fastcapitalism/10_1/sbicca10_1.html
Article
Full-text available
The food justice movement is a budding social movement premised on ideologies that critique the structural oppression responsible for many injustices throughout the agrifood system. Tensions often arise however when a radical ideology in various versions from multiple previous movements is woven into mobilization efforts by organizations seeking to...
Article
Full-text available
The focus on food within environmental justice scholarship and activism has rapidly advanced as issues such as differential access to healthy food, the distribution of hunger and obesity, and the working con-ditions of agricultural workers have garnered much deserved attention. This has spawned a new research agenda under the moniker of ''food just...
Article
Full-text available
The theoretical frameworks of the treadmill of production and the treadmill of destruction are used to explore how the expansionary dynamics of capitalism and militarism, along with a complicit state apparatus, harm the environment and human health. The treadmill analysis is extended beyond a structural explanation of the occurrence of environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
In an era of ecological degradation and sexual inequality it has become increasingly clear that these problems are complex. The complexity arises from the intersecting contributions of our institutions, cultures, collective imaginations, personal cognitive processes and ecological systems. At the same time, there is growing recognition among activi...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Created a database of 670 New York Times and Washington Post articles between 1971 and 2018 that cover hunger strikes in carceral contexts under the jurisdiction of the United States. The next step is to start data analysis to identify patterns in media coverage and the contexts within which hunger strikes take place. The project is concerned with what drives hunger strikes as a tactic, the response of authorities, and the role of media in structuring the field of contention by (dis)allowing certain voices and narratives.
Project
Studying the disciplinary role of agriculture in prisons in the United States in the context of racial capitalism. This includes creating the first-ever database of federal- and state-run adult prisons with food, plant, and animal production and education. The database provides a foundation for creating an interactive ArcGIS map, a story map, and a gallery of satellite images of prisons with agricultural activities.
Project
This is an edited volume with Alison Alkon and Yuki Kato that elevates the relationship between food and gentrification. It will explore three topical areas. These include how urban growth machines mobilize foodscapes for development, the loss of food spaces due to gentrification and displacement, and forms of food activism and food policy that resist and ameliorate gentrification.