Josephine Hoegaerts

Josephine Hoegaerts
University of Helsinki | HY · Department of Cultures, European Studies

PhD

About

76
Publications
4,009
Reads
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60
Citations
Citations since 2016
32 Research Items
48 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - present
University of Helsinki
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2017 - February 2018
Academy of Finland
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2015 - August 2017
University of Helsinki
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
This introduction outlines how the authors of the special issue share not an eloquence-centred but a more encompassing, interactive, embodied and experience-oriented interpretation of political performance as their heuristic prism. Through this lens, they analyze vocal expectations and deviations in political debates that took place in a few differ...
Article
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has made explicit what many of us already knew and some of us are constantly made to feel: good health and the abilities of our bodies & minds1 are fluid and uncertain. We can only ever hold them precariously (Butler, 2004; Scully, 2014). In the end, we are all vulnerable beings. And, yet, vulnerability, perhaps especi...
Chapter
This short thought piece focuses on the novel contributions the authors of Lived Nation make to the study of the nation, and to the new history of experience. It discusses the historiographical origins of the new history of experience, especially in its links to the history of emotions, and the boundaries of this exciting new historical approach. I...
Article
This article examines the role of the voice in practices of representation in nineteenth-century parliament. It asks how textual representations of vocal practices of political representation can be mobilized for the histories of politics and representation, and how such an enquiry can complicate our understanding of representation as a multifariou...
Preprint
Full-text available
Call for papers — Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies/Journal of Gender Studies Special Issue: Dis/abling Gender Deadline abstracts: 1st of May 2021. For more information, see the PDF.
Article
Full-text available
How do we thoroughly historicize the voice, or integrate it into our historical research, and how do we account for the mundane daily practices of voice . . . the constant talking, humming, murmuring, whispering, and mumbling that went on off stage, in living rooms, debating clubs, business meetings, and on the streets? Work across the humanities h...
Article
The nineteenth century saw a rise in the categorization and systematic observation of manifestations of dysfluent speech. This article examines how, from the 1820s onward, different vocabularies to distinguish between different speech impediments were developed in France, Germany and Britain. It also charts how different meanings, categories and ch...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter focuses on a period in history in which ‘being a politician’ developed into a career-path, as representative politics became a matter of professional skill and expertise rather than a leisurely gentlemanly pursuit. It attempts to chart some ways in which the male career politician can be historicised, drawing on examples from the Belgi...
Book
Full-text available
This book focuses on the multiple and diverse masculinities ‘at work’. Spanning both historical approaches to the rise of ‘profession’ as a marker of masculinity, and critical approaches to the current structures of management, employment and workplace hierarchy, the book questions what role masculinity plays in cultural understandings, affective e...
Article
Full-text available
Sound ‘does’ things to places, to people and to time: it can affect change. This collection focuses specifically on the role sound has played as an agent of modernity. How were sound and music used as the material of modernization, how did they help create group identities, how were they mobilized in asserting power? In order to study this active q...
Article
This article calls for a heightened attention to women’s voices in the history of education, arguing that the articulation of gender is not only ‘legible’ as bodily inscription, but audible within the educational soundscape as well. The voice and its gendered attributes are taken literally here, as acoustic practice. I explore women’s contributions...
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues for an embodied approach to the scientist’s persona, using ‘experience’ as its focal point. Rather than noting that embodied experiences influenced scientists’ practices and identities amidst (or despite) ideals of objectivity, I want to draw attention to the ways in which personal, embodied experiences were celebrated in nineteen...
Article
In order to introduce the special issue on “educational soundscapes” the editors, first of all, explore the intimate link between silence, sound and the production of social meaning. An acoustic history of education, so it is argued, cannot solely focus on silence nor can it solely focus on sound. After having demonstrated the necessity of taking i...
Article
At the heart of the nineteenth-century educational soundscape lies a paradox. Whilst “modern” classrooms generally strived for orderly silence, the goal of its educational practices was the production of competent “citizens”. Middle-class boys in particular were expected to acquire a voice fit for business, the professions, or even (political) publ...
Article
Focussing on the 'audibility' of young children in school archives, this paper revisits one of the oldest and most poignant questions in subaltern studies : can the subaltern speak ? Although archival material pertaining to children is largely comprised of texts generated by the adults governing them, children's fear, joy and anger does occasionall...
Article
Studies of soldiers’ lives and military culture in peacetime have hitherto mainly focused on life in the barracks. The role of maneuvers, exercises for all ranks and all arms aimed to train military men’s movements for specific strategies, have garnered far less attention. In this article, we examine the practice of maneuvering by the Belgian army...
Article
Acording to Karen Sanchez-Eppler, “historical and cultural studies have tended to discount childhood as a significant site of analysis because children are primarily seen as passive receptors of culture”. This status of children as “objects of socialization” rather than as historical actors in their own right can at least partly be attributed to th...
Article
This paper examines deaf citizenship in the nineteenth century and today to determine how metaphors of voice and silence have been used to refer to political representation, emancipation, and participation. The notions of speech and citizenship are metaphorically interdependent and they contrast with the perceived ‘voicelessness’ of deaf adults tha...
Article
Full-text available
The modern history of disability, and of speech impediments in particular, has largely been written as one of medical discourse and (more recently) of social and cultural imaginations. The pathology of speech appears as an embodied, but ultimately intangible, issue, due to the transient nature of sound itself. Once produced, it disappears, and seem...
Book
Stilte is in. Steeds vaker zoeken mensen naar stilte als tegengif tegen de gejaagdheid van het leven. Stilte is echter veel meer dan een hedendaags fenomeen. Stilte heeft een geschiedenis, scherpe kantjes en schaduwzijden. In dit boek wordt op een essayistische en toegankelijke manier het complexe karakter van stilte beschreven. Aan de hand van th...
Article
This article focuses on the acoustic aspect of parliamentary government in nineteenth-century Britain, demonstrating the continued importance of speech and audibility for representatives in the reformed House of Commons. Notions of what constituted a proper parliamentary voice changed as electoral reforms, the rise of the “fourth estate,” and scien...
Chapter
The unequal relation between the infantry and the other arms was commonly known and the quality of the infantrymen was, throughout the nineteenth century generally understood as a problem. Soldiers’ lack of strength and stamina was expressed through metaphors of gender and age: the infantry was not only described as the other arms’ younger sister,...
Chapter
Even the politician’s disembodied voice, the ‘voice and nothing more’ presupposes the presence of a body from which it is emitted. As Mladen Dolar in his call for a ‘theory of the voice’ has aptly stated, the voice appears as something closely associated to both meaning and the body: it is the ‘link which ties the signifier to the body’, but belong...
Chapter
On 25 August 1830, the beau monde of what would soon become Belgium was attending a performance of Auber’s romantic nationalist opera La Muette de Portici. Common lore of the Belgian ‘operetta rev- olution’ speaks of crowds inspired by the martial tones of the opera running into the streets of Brussels while chanting ‘vive la liberté’ and opening t...
Chapter
As mentioned before, the rising importance of travelling for both school-children and soldiers led to an expansion of the repertoire of hiking and marching songs that allowed for a synchronisation of feet while also carrying geographical and historical information on the country travelled.1 Several music manuals for primary schools at the end of th...
Chapter
With the ‘operatic’ revolution, and the diplomatic, military and political consequences it entailed, a new nation was effectively born in 1830. Not only was a new and independent government (including a king) to be installed, the institutions of a modern nation state had to be built as well. In this chapter, three particular institutions are introd...
Chapter
The creation of a national canon of (sung) music developing in conjunction with the construction of national institutions and their respective buildings, points to similar processes of nation building. As will become clear, the national canon was partly consciously created by composers and educators referring to current ideas on the role of music i...
Article
it describes have a history? Because they are intuitively recognizable and anchored in the body, emotions can appear as a universal human feature, present throughout the ages. Recent research into their history, however, shows that emotions and their expression have changed considerably over time. Not only the norms and expectations regarding emoti...
Article
Is a broken heart forever? Or do the metaphor and feeling it describes have a history? Because they are intuitively recognizable and anchored in the body, emotions can appear as a universal human feature, present throughout the ages. Recent research into their history, however, shows that emotions and their expression have changed considerably over...
Article
Battlefields occupy a peculiar place in a modern nation's history and imagination. At the end of the nineteenth century patriotic duty leading to a heroic death was an important element in the romantic discourse in Western Europe. Waterloo was one of the battlefields that explicitly evoked the national past. Waterloo was not only a place for rememb...
Article
Full-text available
This article traces the evolution of different discourses of masculinity in the nineteenth century Belgian army. It highlights specifically the way in which officers and men used concepts such as fatherliness, brotherhood, youthfulness, filial duty and other kinship metaphors to express their gendered identities and their mutual relationships withi...
Article
Tracing the legislative debates surrounding the introduction of a law on duelling in the Belgian penal code in 1841, this article examines the changing discourses and practices of ‘honour’ in the Belgian parliamentary hemicycle. The unique position of the nineteenth century Belgian duellist, created by the new law, allows for a new perspective on t...
Article
Tracing the legislative debates surrounding the introduction of a law on duelling in the Belgian penal code in 1841, this article examines the changing discourses and practices of 'honour' in the Belgian parliamentary hemicycle. The unique position of the nineteenth century Belgian duellist, created by the new law, allows for a new perspective on t...
Article
This article uses the case study of the Belgian grandes manoeuvres of 1882 and 1883 to explore the ways in which self-defined ‘all male’ spaces can contribute to the study and deconstruction of historical masculinities. Using the manoeuvres of the Belgian army at the end of the nineteenth century as a theatre of (military as well as civilian) corpo...
Article
Full-text available
This article focuses on Saint Nicholas, a “hero of the hearth”. Retracing the narratives and imagery on Nicholas in the Catholic region of Flanders from the end of the eighteenth until the beginning of the twentieth century, the Saint is brought forward as a romance-related patron, a stern authoritarian figure and a sentimental grandfather. Rather...
Article
On January 24, 1885, at 9:30 in the morning, a woman from the small rural village of Saint Laurent in East Flanders entered the Palace of Justice of Ghent. Pregnant with her eighth child, she had fled from her husband and was filing for a divorce. That morning, she was led to a small room—the office of the judge of the Regional Court—and was standi...

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