Joseph G Skeate

Joseph G Skeate
University of Minnesota Twin Cities | UMN · Department of Pediatrics

Doctor of Philosophy in Medical Biology

About

32
Publications
10,306
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
782
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
596 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
I am a highly active individual with a vast array of experiences and am currently pursuing my PhD in medical biology at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. I specialize in cancer immunotherapy of tumor associated antigen cancers, immunology, and virology of the human papillomavirus (HPV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the herpes simplex virus (HSV).
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - August 2018
University of Southern California
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2013 - August 2015
University of Southern California
Position
  • Research Technician II, Interim Laboratory Manager
August 2013 - August 2015
University of Southern California
Position
  • Laboratory Technician II
Education
August 2015 - May 2019
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Medical Biology
August 2012 - September 2014
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
September 2004 - August 2008
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Biochemistry

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) was originally implicated in the etiology of cervical cancer, and although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is now the accepted causative agent, the epidemiologic link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers persists. The Annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) has been shown to mediate infectious HPV type 16 (HPV16) uptake by...
Article
Carcinomas of the anogenital tract, in particular cervical cancer, remains one of the most common cancers in women, and represent the most frequent gynecological malignancies and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced lesions are immunologically distinct in that they express viral antigens, w...
Article
Full-text available
In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) r...
Article
Full-text available
Human papillomaviruses (HPV) establish persistent infections because of evolved immune evasion mechanisms , particularly HPV-mediated suppression of the immune functions of Langerhans cells (LC), the antigen presenting cells of the epithelium. Polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid (Poly-I:C) is broadly immunostimulatory with the ability to enhance APC ex...
Article
Full-text available
Mucosotropic, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are sexually transmitted viruses that are causally associated with the development of cervical cancer. The most common high-risk genotype, HPV16, is an obligatory intracellular virus that must gain entry into host epithelial cells and deliver its double stranded DNA to the nucleus. HPV capsid pro...
Article
Full-text available
Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) genotypes results in a large number of anogenital and head and neck cancers worldwide. Although prophylactic vaccination coverage has improved, there remains a need to develop methods that inhibit viral transmission toward preventing the spread of HPV-driven disease. Defensins are a c...
Article
Purpose: A Phase I clinical trial (GOG-9929) examined the safety and efficacy of adjuvant immune modulation therapy with the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab (anti-CTLA4) following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for newly diagnosed node-positive human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cervical cancer. To better understand the mechanism of action and to id...
Article
Full-text available
Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (LIGHT) has been in pre-clinical development for over a decade and shows promise as a modality of enhancing treatment approaches in the field of cancer immunotherapy. To date, LIGHT has been used to combat cancer in multiple tumor models where it can be combined with other immunotherapy modalities to clea...
Article
Full-text available
Langerhans cells (LC) are the resident antigen presenting cells of the mucosal epithelium and play an essential role in initiating immune responses. LC are the only cells in the body to contain Birbeck granules (BG), which are unique cytoplasmic organelles comprised of c-type lectin langerin. Studies of BG have historically focused on morphological...
Article
Full-text available
Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is causally linked to the development of several human cancers, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers. To address the need for a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-associated diseases, here we test and compare the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of a bacteri...
Article
Full-text available
Viral life cycles consist of three main phases: (1) attachment and entry, (2) genome replication and expression, and (3) assembly, maturation, and egress. Each of these steps is intrinsically reliant on host cell factors and processes including cellular receptors, genetic replication machinery, endocytosis and exocytosis, and protein expression. An...
Article
Full-text available
Human papillomavirus (HPV) entry into epithelial cells is independent of canonical endocytic pathways. Upon interaction with host cells, HPV establishes infection by traversing through an endocytic pathway that is clathrin- and caveolin-independent, but dependent on the annexin A2/S100A10 heterotetramer (A2t). We examined the contribution of monome...
Article
Full-text available
Background Prior small studies have shown increased expression of sperm protein 17 (Sp17) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissue and suggest Sp17 as a potential biomarker for EOC. However, how Sp17 expression varies with histology, grade, and stage of EOC and its expression in other ovarian neoplasms has not been defined. It is unknown whether p...
Article
High-risk human papillomavirus-associated cancers express viral oncoproteins (e.g., E6 and E7) that induce and maintain the malignant phenotype. The viral origin of these proteins makes them attractive targets for development of a therapeutic vaccine. Camelid-derived single-domain antibody fragments (nanobodies or VHHs) that recognize cell surface...
Article
Full-text available
Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic ce...
Data
Compiled excel datasheet for experiments with individual tumor measurements. Tabs on spreadsheet include individual experiment data used to generate figures. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
During sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), macrophages are initial targets for HIV infection. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) has been shown to protect against HIV infection of macrophages through interactions with annexin A2 (A2), which is found on the macrophage cell surface as a heterotetramer (A2t) consistin...
Article
Full-text available
Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infections are intra-epithelial, and thus, HPV16 is known to interact with Langerhans cells (LCs), the resident epithelial antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The current paradigm for APC-mediated induction of T cell anergy is through delivery of T cell receptor signals via peptides on MHC molecules (signal 1), but...
Article
Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of Langerhans cell (LC) function can lead to persistent infection and development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Women with HPV-induced high-grade CIN2/3 have not mounted an effective immune response against HPV, yet it is unknown if LC-mediated T cell activation from such women is funct...
Article
Objectives: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection leads to the development of several human cancers that cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. HPV type 16 (HPV16) is the most common of the cancer-causing genotypes and gains entry to the basal cells of the epithelium through a non-canonical endocytic pathway that involves the...
Article
Background: LIGHT, a ligand for lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) and herpes virus entry mediator, is predominantly expressed on activated immune cells and LTβR signaling leads to the recruitment of lymphocytes. The interaction between LIGHT and LTβR has been previously shown to activate immune cells and result in tumor regression in a virally-induced...
Article
Full-text available
The systemic treatment of soft tissue sarcomas other than Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) has not changed for several decades. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma has led to its application to other solid tumors with many ongoing studies that await completion. Soft tissue sarcomas possess sever...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Historically, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) was the first etiologic agent implicated in the development of cervical cancer, and although Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is now the globally accepted causative agent, ongoing epidemiologic data still suggests that HSV is linked to cervical cancer development. An uptake receptor for HPV, the Annexin A2/S100A10...
Article
Full-text available
High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are sexually transmitted viruses causally associated with several cancers. During its natural life cycle, HPV16, the most common high-risk genotype, infects the epithelial basal cells in a process facilitated through a recently identified receptor, the annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t). During infection, HPV16...
Article
Full-text available
A retrospective case series of three patients with chronic low back pain who received baseline MRI scans revealing multifidus muscle atrophy with fatty replacement is provided. Each patient received spinal manipulative therapy, and two were compliant with low back exercises targeting the multifidus. A follow-up scan performed >1 year later was comp...
Article
Human papillomavirus (HPV) has evolved mechanisms that allow it to evade the human immune system. Studies have shown HPV-mediated suppression of activation of Langerhans cells (LC) is a key mechanism through which HPV16 evades initial immune surveillance. However, it has not been established whether high- and low-risk mucosal and cutaneous HPV geno...
Article
Full-text available
Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect epithelia and can lead to the development of lesions, some of which have malignant potential. HPV type 16 is the most oncogenic genotype and causes various types of cancer, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. However, despite significant research, our understanding of the mechanism by which HPV1...
Data
HPV16 L1 and L2 immunoblot analysis of HPV16 WT PsV and HPV16 L1–L2(GGDD) mutant PsV. An equal amount of infectious particles of wildtype and mutant pseudovirions were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to PVDF membranes. Blots were separately probed with a mouse anti-L1 antibody followed by IR800 (green)-labeled goat anti-mouse IgG secondary an...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
We have run across a tumor cell line with a high-incidence of ulceration formation (leading to early euthanization in tumor-growth experiments). During a conversation with another group the idea of using Matrigel during injections was suggested as a means of preventing this.
Does anyone have any relevant experience with this solution (Subcutaneous injections)?
Alternatively does anyone have suggestions for reducing incidences of tumor ulcerations?

Network

Cited By