Joseph Sanborn

Joseph Sanborn
University of Central Florida | UCF · Department of Criminal Justice

About

27
Publications
3,291
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369
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
55 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015

Publications

Publications (27)
Chapter
Full-text available
Ex parte Crouse is a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision from 1839. Although it is known as a major appellate case that upheld the operation of the nineteenth-century houses of refuge, Crouse was more important in what it established for the future juvenile justice system in the twentieth century. Crouse would end up providing three critical preced...
Chapter
Full-text available
Judges are important and powerful governmental figures. Their work, at both trial and during the appeal of a case, is critical in ensuring that defendants receive justice, and that the interests of society are represented and vindicated.
Article
Drawing on framing theory, the present study tests the impact of question wording on people’s reported opinions about the harshness of their local courts. A randomized experimental design tested two salient variations against the standard wording used in the National Opinion Research Center’s General Social Survey (GSS). The results indicated stati...
Article
Full-text available
This Article examines and refutes the validity of the explosion of claims in the literature that juveniles are not competent to stand trial in criminal court. After providing a framework through which to analyze the legal relationship between juvenile defendants and the requirements for competency to stand trial, this Article summarizes the current...
Article
The fate awaiting the juvenile charged with murder varies considerably from state to state. In some jurisdictions the youth (depending on age) would have to be prosecuted in juvenile court and receive at worst the most severe sanction available in that forum. In other locations the juvenile could have to be tried in adult court or could be sent the...
Article
This article examines the various ways in which youth that are charged with criminal behavior are excluded from the juvenile court process and are prosecuted instead in criminal court. The first objective of this work is to eliminate the confusion and misrepresentations concerning exclusion that have dominated the juvenile justice literature. Sugge...
Article
Full-text available
For several decades, juvenile courts functioned like clinics. Judges assigned there were instructed to assume a variety of roles: jurist, psychologist, counselor, sociologist, and parent. The In re Gault decision in 1967 granted juvenile defendants several constitutional rights that transformed juvenile courts into criminal court-like operations. J...
Article
Existing research on the criteria used by juvenile court judges in choosing dispositions is limited in two respects. First, the predictor variables included in most investigations have been limited either in number or in the quality of their measurement. Second, research has not focused on sentencing decisions for serious offenders. Using a factori...
Article
Unlike adults, children have no right to a speedy trial, and usually don't get one.
Article
Although juvenile adjudications often lack basic constitutional protections and are not the equivalent of criminal convictions, most jurisdictions now factor them into sentencing of adults.
Article
The dispositional stage is the most critical decision-making level delinquent youths encounter in juvenile court. Previous research has produced inconsistent results concerning what motivates court officials in making sentencing decisions. One hundred workers (judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and probation officers) from three juvenile court...
Article
For several decades, prosecutors rarely worked in juvenile courts. The In re Gault decision in 1967, however, granted juvenile criminal defendants several constitutional rights that have transformed juvenile courts into criminal-court-like operations. Although prosecutors now regularly appear in juvenile court, generally, they have not been told wh...
Article
Parents play a critical role in juvenile court proceedings. Nevertheless, precisely what parents should do in this forum has been ignored in the literature. In this study 100 personnel (judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys and probation officers) from three juvenile courts (urban, suburban and rural) were interviewed to determine how parents impa...
Article
Traditionally, adjudicatory hearings in juvenile court operated under the direction of the parens patriae doctrine, the state's obligation and license to care for children. Adjudications were achieved in informal, clinic-like sessions. The Supreme Court purportedly transformed juvenile court hearings into criminal-like trials via the Gault and Wins...
Article
Originally, juvenile courts were designed to promote only the best interests of the child. Developments within the last three decades, however, have suggested that there are other interests represented in juvenile court proceedings. In this study, one hundred juvenile court workers (judges, prosecutors, defense counsel, probation officers) from thr...
Article
Recent juvenile justice commentators have been guilty of serious misrepresentations about the process of transferring juvenile defendants to criminal court. If accepted, these misrepresentations could lead to dramatic changes in juvenile court certification policy. The purposes of this article are twofold. The first is to thoroughly explicate the t...
Article
Despite indications of its existence, plea bargaining in juvenile court remains largely unexplored. Despite the absence of research, numerous state legislatures and national commissions have formulated divergent positions regarding juvenile court plea negotiation. This article presents the results of interviews conducted with 100 workers from three...
Article
This study was designed to examine the guilty plea process in juvenile court. In the first phase of the research, I analyzed statutes, court rules, and case law from all 50 states to see what the country had decided about pleading guilty in juvenile court. In the second phase I observed three juvenile courts to ascertain their responses to juvenile...
Article
Plea bargaining is one of the most emotional and controversial topics in the field of criminal justice. Not only is it defined and documented poorly, its origins also are much disputed. Pro-plea bargainers like to trace plea bargaining to Cain and Abel's classic struggle. Anti-plea bargainers cite the post-American Civil War era as the beginning po...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--State University of New York at Albany, 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 334-355). "8514089." Microfiche.

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