Joseph Manson

Joseph Manson
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

77
Publications
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4,268
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
1553 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Joseph Manson is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles. Joseph does research in Biological Anthropology and Evolutionary Psychology. His current project is a study of individual life insurance risk ratings as measure of mortality risk and a correlate of behavioral aspects of life history strategy.

Publications

Publications (77)
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Full-text available
The neotropical capuchin monkeys (genera Cebus and Sapajus) have converged with hominins and Pan in several respects, including brain expansion and slow life histories, and they thereby provide an important data point for comparative analyses. Capuchins live in stable, female-philopatric social groups in which alpha males, as preferred mates, sire...
Article
Across cultures, women reliably exhibit higher levels of Neuroticism than men. Recent work shows that this sex difference, particularly in Neuroticism’s anxiety facet, is partly mediated by the sex difference in physical strength. We build on this finding by testing pre-registered predictions of mediation by physical strength of the sex differences...
Article
Two of the controversies besetting the field of life history theory in psychology (LHT-P) are (1) whether life history strategy (LHS) is most fruitfully conceptualized as a latent reflective factor, or as a formative, descriptive construct and (2) whether the instruments most commonly used to measure psychometric LHS adequately cover its components...
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Objective The controversial General Factor of Personality (GFP) has been proposed as an indicator of social effectiveness and a slower life history strategy. An alternative hypothesis holds that only meta-trait alpha , comprising agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability, is a slow life history indicator. This study tested whether t...
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Recent research suggests the validity of the construct of Left-wing Authoritarianism (LWA). Like its well-studied parallel construct Right-wing Authoritarianism, LWA is characterized by dogmatism, punitive attitudes toward dissenters, and desire for strong authority figures. In contrast to RWA, LWA mobilizes these traits on behalf of left-wing valu...
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Humans subtly synchronize body movement during face-to-face conversation. In this context, bodily synchrony has been linked to affiliation and social bonding, task success and comprehension, and potential conflict. Almost all studies of conversational synchrony involve dyads, and relatively less is known about the structure of synchrony in groups l...
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Objectives Life History (LH) Theory explains how organisms allocate energy among the competing demands of growth and maintenance (i.e., investment in future reproduction), mating effort, and parenting effort. LH profile is thought to be influenced by cues of extrinsic mortality and morbidity. Human LH strategies have been conceptualized on a fast-s...
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The dark triad (DT) traits are differentially related to psychometrically assessed life history strategy (LHS), such that psychopathy is strongly associated with a faster LHS, whereas narcissism appears to be, if anything, a slow LHS indicator. However, the research supporting these generalizations has been based largely on undergraduate samples in...
Article
Full-text available
Life history theory is a fruitful source of testable hypotheses about human individual differences. However, this field of study is beset by unresolved debates about basic concepts and methods. One of these controversies concerns the usefulness of instruments that purport to tap a unidimensional life history (LH) factor based on a set of self-repor...
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Research by Sherman et al. (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 873–888, 2013) has shown that, in speech during clinical-style interviews, life history strategy (LHS) was correlated with variation in the use of 16–19 word categories from the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count program. However, links between individual difference varia...
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Life history theory has generated cogent, well-supported hypotheses about individual differences in human biodemographic traits (e.g., age at sexual maturity) and psycho-metric traits (e.g., conscientiousness), but little is known about how variation in life history strategy (LHS) is manifest in quotidian human behavior. Here I test predicted assoc...
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Little is known about people’s ability to detect subclinical psychopathy from others’ quotidian social behavior, or about the correlates of variation in this ability. This study sought to address these questions using a thin slice personality judgment paradigm. We presented 108 undergraduate judges (70.4% female) with 1.5 minute video thin slices o...
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The Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) is a method for collecting periodic brief audio snippets of participants’ daily lives using a portable recording device. The EAR can potentially intrude into people’s privacy, alter their natural behavior, and introduce self-selection biases greater than in other types of social science methods. Previous...
Chapter
Consortships are short-term (up to two weeks) mating relationships observed in many group-living primate species that lack long-term mating relationships. Although precise descriptions and definitions vary widely, consorting pairs generally travel, forage, and rest together during the intervals between copulations. Consortship is often a form of ma...
Article
Theory and data generally concur that a slower Life History Strategy (LHS) is associated with higher Conscientiousness, Agreeableness and Emotional Stability. Whether Extraversion and Openness are indicators of a slow LH, or whether they include both fast and slow LH components, remains unresolved. I addressed these questions in two studies: one of...
Chapter
Among many nonhuman animals, individuals differ consistently in their response tendencies (e.g. shy vs. bold) across multiple contexts. Researchers have tested evolutionary hypotheses accounting for these phenomena, and have also begun exploring evolutionary explanations for human personality variation. For evolutionary biologists, a trait’s signif...
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Although several studies have linked Life History Strategy (LHS) variation with variation in the Five Factor Model personality dimensions, no published research has explored the relationship of LHS to the HEXACO personality dimensions. The theoretically expected relationship of the HEXACO Emotionality factor to LHS is unclear. The results of two st...
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The determinants of conversational dominance are not well understood. We used videotaped triadic interactions among unacquainted same-sex American college students to test predictions drawn from the theoretical distinction between dominance and prestige as modes of human status competition. Specifically, we investigated the effects of physical form...
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To account for the widespread human tendency to cooperate in one-shot social dilemmas, some theorists have proposed that cooperators can be reliably detected based on ethological displays that are difficult to fake. Experimental findings have supported the view that cooperators can be distinguished from defectors based on "thin slices" of behavior,...
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During conversation, interlocutors coordinate their behavior on many levels. Two distinct forms of behavioral coordination have been empirically linked with affiliation and cooperation during or following face-to-face interaction: behavior matching and interpersonal synchrony. Only the latter form constitutes behavioral entrainment involving a coup...
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Research on nonhuman primate personality dimensions has focused on a small number of taxa, and little of this work has focused on wild populations. We used ratings to assess personality structure in wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) over a 9-year period, using a capuchin-specific rating instrument based partly on existing instruments. Ad...
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Recent evidence suggests that psychopathy is a trait continuum. This has unappreciated implications for understanding the selective advantage of psychopathic traits. Although clinical psychopathy is typically construed as a strategy of unconditional defection, subclinical psychopathy may promote strategic conditional defection, broadening the adapt...
Article
Theory and a growing body of empirical evidence suggest that higher ranking males experience reproductive advantages in group-living mammals. White-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) exhibit an interesting social system for investigating the relationship between dominance and reproductive success (RS) because they live in multimale multifemale socia...
Article
Renewed interest in fission‐fusion dynamics is due to the recognition that such dynamics may create unique challenges for social interaction and distinctive selective pressures acting on underlying communicative and cognitive abilities. New frameworks for integrating current knowledge on fission‐fusion dynamics emerge from a fundamental rethinking...
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Nineteen scientists from different disciplines collaborated in highlighting new methodological and theoretical aspects in the re-emerging study area of fission-fusion dynamics. The renewed interest in this area is due to the recognition that such dynamics may create unique challenges for social interaction and distinctive selective pressures acting...
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Studies of kin bias in the distribution of social behaviour in group-living matrifocal species generally underline the importance of bonds among female kin. However, few studies examine either how kin bias may be affected by variation in the availability of kin or the relevance of paternal kin. In this study, we used genetic and behavioural data to...
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Urine washing (UW) is taxonomically widespread among strepsirhines and platyrrhines, yet its functional significance is still unclear. We used 2274 h of focal follows of 35 adult and subadult wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) to test 1) the intergroup signaling, intragroup social signaling, and thermoregulatory hypotheses for UW and 2) t...
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No Abstract. Peer Reviewed http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/38587/1/1360020307_ftp.pdf
Article
The likelihood of reconciliation (defined as preferential peaceful contact among former opponents following conflicts) has been predicted to vary positively with relationship value and compatibility, and negatively with relationship security. Long-term data on wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) indicate that dyads consisting of an adult f...
Article
The parcelling model of reciprocity predicts that grooming partners will alternate between giving and receiving grooming within grooming bouts, and that each partner will perform approximately as much grooming as it receives within each bout (‘time matching’). Models of allogrooming based on biological markets theory predict that individuals of low...
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Full-text available
Infanticide by male primates is widespread [van Schaik, 2000], though debate continues about its adaptive significance [Sussman et al., 1995; Hrdy et al., 1995]. Here we report one observed and two inferred cases of infanticide by adult male white‐faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) at Lomas Barbudal Biological Reserve, Costa Rica, a site wher...
Article
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The social intelligence hypothesis, which holds that social challenges have selected for increased intelligence and social skills, has been supported by evidence that, in catarrhine primates, individuals know about the characteristics of groupmates' social relationships. Evidence for such ‘triadic awareness’ has not been sought for platyrrhine prim...
Article
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During 12 years of observation, we have observed three confirmed and two inferred lethal coalitionary attacks on adult male white-faced capuchins ( Cebus capucinus) by members of two habituated social groups at Lomas Barbudal Biological Reserve, Costa Rica. In one case, an alpha male was badly wounded and evicted from his group, and when later foun...
Article
Elevated rates of self-directed behaviour (SDB) such as self-scratching and autogrooming have been widely used in recent years as an indicator of anxiety in catarrhine primates. This study presents the first examination of correlates of SDB rates in a platyrrhine primate. Subjects were 8 wild female white-faced capuchins at Lomas Barbudal, Costa Ri...
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Full-text available
Capuchins exhibit considerable cross-site variation in domains such as foraging strategy, vocal communication and social interaction. We report interactions between white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and other species. We present comparative data for 11 groups from 3 sites in Costa Rica that are ecologically similar and geographically close, t...
Chapter
Full-text available
Socially maintained behavioural traditions in non-human species hold great interest for biologists, anthropologists and psychologists. This book treats traditions in non-human species as biological phenomena that are amenable to the comparative methods of inquiry used in contemporary biology. Chapters in the first section define behavioural traditi...
Article
Traditions, defined as relatively long-lasting behavioral practices shared among members of a group partly via social learning, were studied in monkeys, specifically Japanese macaques, before being studied in great apes. Although apes and humans may share some social learning capacities that are absent in monkeys, a complete understanding of the ro...
Article
Full-text available
Ten researchers collaborated in a long-term study of social conventions in wild white-faced capuchin monkeys, involving examination of a 19,000-hour combined data set collected on 13 social groups at four study sites in Costa Rica over a 13-year period. Five behavior patterns qualified as social traditions, according to the study's criteria: handsn...
Article
Although avoidance of predators has long been thought to play a major role in the evolution of primate sociality [van Schaik, 1983], there are relatively few data on predation attempts on primates and the responses of primates to attacks by predators [Stanford, 2002]. Wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) regularly mob snakes [Chapman, 1986]...
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Full-text available
Three questions about female-female relationships remain largely unexplored in female-philopatric platyrrhines. First, to what extent is female dominance status dependent on coalitional support? Second, how stable are female dominance hierarchies over multiyear periods? Third, what is the role of allogrooming in servicing long-term social relations...
Article
The evolved functions, if any, of infant handling (IH) by female primates remain unclear for many species. I tested a new hypothesis, that IH tests social bonds between adult females, using data on a group of wild white-faced capuchins. I also tested the nonadaptive, learning-to-mother, reciprocity, harassment and alliance-formation hypotheses. Foc...
Article
The human “environment of evolutionary adaptedness” can only be inferred indirectly. In contrast, the behavior of some nonhuman animals can be compared among “natural” and various altered environments. As an example, male immigration tactics in unprovisioned versus provisioned macaque (Macaca) populations are compared using Tooby and Cosmides’s (19...
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Full-text available
First defined by C. R. Carpenter in 1942, ''consortship'' has retained a central role in the conceptual tool kit used by students of the mating behavior of multimale group-living primates. Systematic coding of 48 published works revealed that a heterogeneous set of phenomena has been subsumed under the consortship concept, ranging from brief copula...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual behavior by infecundable females, and by same-sex and adult-immature dyads, occurs in wild and captive bonobos (Pan paniscus). Proposed functions of these behaviors, in social primates generally, include practice, paternity confusion, exchange, and communication as well as appeasement. We used this framework to interpret and to compare obser...
Article
It has been hypothesized that series mounting (multiple intromissions preceding ejaculation) is functionally related to male–male competition and/or female mate choice. Free-ranging rhesus macaques,Macaca mulatta, engaged in uninterrupted mount series ranging in duration from less than 1 min to 56 min. Over 90% of mount series interruptions were ca...
Article
Male rhesus macaques sometimes give loud calls while thrusting or dismounting during multi-mount copulations.Hauser (1993) has proposed that these calls (1) impose a cost (increased risk of aggression) on calling males, and (2) increase callers' copulation frequencies, supporting the hypothesis that calls function as honest signals (handicaps) that...
Article
Primate social groups frequently contain multiple males. Male group size has been hypothesized to result from male mating competition, but the selective factors responsible for the evolution of multimale groups are unclear. Short breeding seasons create situations that are not conducive for single males to monopolize mating access to females, and m...
Article
Primate social groups frequently contain multiple males. Male group size has been hypothesized to result from male mating competition, but the selective factors responsible for the evolution of multimale groups are unclear. Short breeding seasons create situations that are not conducive for single males to monopolize mating access to females, and m...
Article
Prior research has shown that estrous female rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatto ) maintain spatial proximity preferentially to lower-ranking males. In this paper, 657 h of focal individual follows of 48 free-ranging estrous female rhesus macaques of two social groups during two mating seasons are used to evaluate the hypothesis that this phenomenon i...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares adult and adolescent female rhesus macaques with regard to (1) characteristics of their copulatory partners, (2) their proceptive behaviors, and (3) adult male behaviors toward them during estrus. We conducted focal follows of 24 adolescent and 65 adult free-ranging estrous female rhesus macaques on Cayo Santiago during two mati...
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Full-text available
Birth season adult heterosexual nonkin relationships of 50 free-ranging female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in two social groups at Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico were examined using focal follow (289 hr) and ad lib data. Eighty-eight percent of subjects had at least one relationship characterized by particularly high frequencies of spatial proximi...
Article
Peer Reviewed http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/31417/1/0000334.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Five adult and subadult sons of middle- and low-ranking female rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ) were observed to hold high dominance rank in their natal groups during a 12-month study at Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico. Three of these males also experienced high mating success during at least one mating season. These findings contrast with all previou...
Article
Whether nonhuman primates avoid copulating with close kin living in their social group is controversial. If sexual aversion to relatives occurs, it should be stronger in females than in males because of females' greater investment in each offspring and hence greater costs resulting from less viable offspring. Data presented here show that adult mal...
Article
Few studies of female mate choice have been carried out among free-ranging non-human primates. To qualify as female mate choice, behaviour by oestrous females must predict the occurrence or rate of potentially fertile copulations, in comparisons between heterosexual dyads. In this paper, data are presented to show three behaviour patterns that meet...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Michigan, 1991. Includes bibliographical references (p. 158-169). Photocopy.
Article
Full-text available
Ten researchers collaborated in a long-term study of social conventions in wild white-faced capuchin monkeys, involving examination of a 19,000-hour combined data set collected on 13 social groups at four study sites in Costa Rica over a 13-year period. Five behavior patterns qualified as social traditions, according to the study's criteria: handsn...

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Project
Our goal is to construct a synthetic framework for personality science that reconciles the existence of a universal human nature with (sometimes cross-culturally variable) patterns of within- and between-person cognitive and behavioral variation. Specifically, this program of research tests hypotheses about (a) the ultimate and proximate origins of adaptively patterned within- and between-person variaton in humans, (b) the specific psychological mechanisms that regulate emergent cognitive and behavioral states, and (c) socioecological drivers of manifest personality structure at the population level.
Project
Uses periodic brief audio recordings of particpants' everyday lives, collected via the Electronically Activated Recorder (Mehl & Robbins, 2012), as well as self-report instruments, to measure Life History Strategy variation in a student sample.