Josefin Stiller

Josefin Stiller
University of Copenhagen · Department of Biology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

36
Publications
11,378
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483
Citations
Education
September 2012 - August 2017
University of California, San Diego
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
June 2009 - February 2012
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Organismic Biology and Evolution
January 2006 - April 2009
Freie Universität Berlin
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Significance The controversy over the taxonomic identity of the eggs exploited by Australia’s first people around 50,000 y ago is resolved. The birds that laid these eggs are extinct, and distinguishing between two main candidates, a giant flightless “mihirung” Genyornis and a large megapode Progura , had proven impossible using morphological and g...
Article
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Background Seahorses, seadragons, pygmy pipehorses, and pipefishes (Syngnathidae, Syngnathiformes) are among the most recognizable groups of fishes because of their derived morphology, unusual life history, and worldwide distribution. Despite previous phylogenetic studies and recent new species descriptions of syngnathids, the evolutionary relation...
Article
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Mud dragons (Kinorhyncha) are microscopic invertebrates, inhabiting marine sediments across the globe from intertidal to hadal depths. They are segmented, moulting animals like arthropods, but grouping with the unsegmented priapulans and loriciferans within Ecdysozoa. There are more than 300 species of kinorhynchs described within 31 genera and 11...
Preprint
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The Xerces Blue (Glaucopsyche xerces) is considered to be the first butterfly to become extinct at global scale in historical times. It was notable for its chalky lavender wings with conspicuous white spots on the ventral wings. The last individuals were collected in their restricted habitat, in the dunes near the Presidio military base in San Fran...
Article
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Aciculata (Eunicida + Phyllodocida) is among the largest clades of annelids, comprising almost half of the known diversity of all marine annelids. Despite the group’s large size and biological importance, most phylogenomic studies on Annelida to date have had a limited sampling of this clade. The phylogenetic placement of many clades within Phyllod...
Article
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Background During evolutionary history, molecular mechanisms have emerged to cope with deleterious mutations. Frameshift insertions in protein-coding sequences are extremely rare because they disrupt the reading frame. There are a few known examples of their correction through translational frameshifting, a process that enables ribosomes to skip nu...
Article
During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), global sea levels were 120‐130 m lower than today, resulting in the emergence of most continental shelves and extirpation of subtidal organisms from these areas. During the interglacial periods, rapid inundation of shelf regions created a dynamic environment for coastal organisms, such as the charismatic leafy...
Article
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New genome assemblies have been arriving at a rapidly increasing pace, thanks to decreases in sequencing costs and improvements in third-generation sequencing technologies1–3. For example, the number of vertebrate genome assemblies currently in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database⁴ increased by more than 50% to 1,485 as...
Article
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Whole-genome sequencing projects are increasingly populating the tree of life and characterizing biodiversity1,2,3,4. Sparse taxon sampling has previously been proposed to confound phylogenetic inference5, and captures only a fraction of the genomic diversity. Here we report a substantial step towards the dense representation of avian phylogenetic...
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The Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) is a small inshore species of odontocete cetacean listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Here, we report on the evolution of S. chinensis chromosomes from its cetruminant ancestor and elucidate the evolutionary history and population genetics of two neighboring S. chinensis populations.We foun...
Article
Sabellida is a well-known clade containing tube-dwelling annelid worms with a radiolar crown. Iterative phylogenetic analyses over three decades have resulted in three main clades being recognized; Fabriciidae, Serpulidae and Sabellidae, with Fabriciidae proposed as the sister group to Serpulidae. However, relationships within Sabellidae have remai...
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Terebelliformia—“spaghetti worms” and their allies—are speciose and ubiquitous marine annelids but our understanding of how their morphological and ecological diversity evolved is hampered by an uncertain delineation of lineages and their phylogenetic relationships. Here, we analyzed transcriptomes of 20 terebelliforms and an outgroup to build a ro...
Article
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As the only endemic neotropical parrot to have recently lived in the northern hemisphere, the Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) was an iconic North American bird. The last surviving specimen died in the Cincinnati Zoo in 1918 [1]. The cause of its extinction remains contentious: besides excessive mortality associated to habitat destructio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cactus, a reference-free multiple genome alignment program, has been shown to be highly accurate, but the existing implementation scales poorly with increasing numbers of genomes, and struggles in regions of highly duplicated sequence. We describe progressive extensions to Cactus that enable reference-free alignment of tens to thousands of large ve...
Article
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Birds are a group with immense availability of genomic resources, and hundreds of forthcoming genomes at the doorstep. We review recent developments in whole genome sequencing, phylogenomics, and comparative genomics of birds. Short read based genome assemblies are common, largely due to efforts of the Bird 10K genome project (B10K). Chromosome-lev...
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Background: A range of higher animal taxa are shared across various chemosynthesis-based ecosystems (CBEs), which demonstrates the evolutionary link between these habitats, but on a global scale the number of species inhabiting multiple CBEs is low. The factors shaping the distributions and habitat specificity of animals within CBEs are poorly unde...
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In Dixie Valley, Nevada, an isolated population of toads has been the subject of proactive conservation measures by the Nevada Department of Wildlife and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service since 2008 due to concerns about potential habitat degradation resulting from exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. These toads appear to belong wi...
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The common seadragon is an iconic fish with presumed limited dispersal, because juveniles hatch directly from the tail of the male parent. Nothing is presently known of their phylogeographic structure, despite conservation concerns and a distribution spanning southern Australia. Here, we sequenced mitochondrial genes from 201 common seadragons in W...
Article
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Until recently, only two species of seadragon were known, Phycodurus eques (the leafy seadragon) and Phyllopteryx taeniolatus (the common seadragon), both from Australia. In 2015, we described a new species of seadragon, Phyllopteryx dewysea (the ruby seadragon). Although the leafy and common seadragons are well known and commonly seen in aquarium...
Article
The leafy seadragon (Phycodurus eques, Syngnathidae), is a charismatic endemic of Australia's temperate coast. The species exhibits remarkable camouflage in its kelp and seagrass habitat. These habitats have been retreating throughout the range of the species, leading to concerns about the persistence of leafy seadragons. Despite being a popular aq...
Article
Full-text available
The exploration of Earth's biodiversity is an exciting and ongoing endeavour. Here, we report a new species of seadragon from Western Australia with substantial morphological and genetic differences to the only two other known species. We describe it as Phyllopteryx dewysea n. sp. Although the leafy seadragon (Phycodurus eques) and the common seadr...
Data
File S1. Systematics and taxonomy of the three seadragon species. Gene trees. Includes figure S1. The common seadragon Phyllopteryx taeniolatus; figure S2. Paratypes of Phyllopteryx dewysea; figure S3. Individual gene trees.
Article
Amphisamytha has five currently recognized species. One of these, A. galapagensis has been reported from numerous hydrothermal vents and methane seeps across the Pacific Ocean. Here, a collection of Amphisamytha from a range of Pacific habitats, as well as Amathys lutzi from Atlantic hydrothermal vents, were studied using morphology and DNA sequenc...
Article
Full-text available
Plant anti-herbivore defence is inducible by both insect feeding and egg deposition. However, little is known about the ability of insect eggs to induce defences directed not against the eggs themselves, but against larvae that subsequently hatch from the eggs. We studied how oviposition (OP) by the sawfly Diprion pini on Pinus sylvestris foliage a...

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