José L Tella

José L Tella
Estación Biológica de Doñana · Conservation Biology

Professor of Research

About

427
Publications
93,952
Reads
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12,445
Citations
Introduction
My interests cover a wide array of issues within evolutionary ecology and conservation biology. Currently, I am focusing on four main lines of research: - Ecology and evolution of invasive species - Contemporary avian urban invasions - Demographic, genetic, physiological, and cultural effects of population fragmentation in birds - Ecology and conservation of Neotropical parrots For a complete list of publications: http://scholar.google.es/citations?user=IQSGbWMAAAAJ&hl=en
Additional affiliations
January 1999 - present
Estación Biológica de Doñana
Position
  • Professor of Research
January 1996 - December 1998
University of Saskatchewan
January 1993 - December 2012
Education
January 1993 - December 1996
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (427)
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Mutually enhancing organisms can become reciprocal determinants of their distribution , abundance, and demography and thus influence ecosystem structure and dynamics. In addition to the prevailing view of parrots (Psittaciformes) as plant antagonists, we assessed whether they can act as plant mutualists in the dry tropical forest of the Bolivian in...
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Despite the importance of behaviour in conservation biology, there have been few studies that address behaviour in areas such as invasion ecology. There is an urgent need to identify specific traits that facilitate the establishment and spread of alien species to prevent biological invasions and their impact on biodiversity. Changes in antipredator...
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Most ecosystems of the world are being increasingly invaded by a variety of alien species. However, little is known about the combined ecological impacts of multiple co-occurring invaders. We assessed the impact of a community of exotic mammals (five domestic and four wild) on forests of monkey puzzle (Araucaria araucana), a globally endangered tre...
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Despite the fact that parrots (Psitacifformes) are generalist apex frugivores, they have largely been considered plant antagonists and thus neglected as seed dispersers of their food plants. Internal dispersal was investigated by searching for seeds in faeces opportunistically collected at communal roosts, foraging sites and nests of eleven parrot...
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Urbanization creates new ecological conditions that can affect biodiversity at all levels, including the diversity and prevalence of parasites of species that may occupy these environments. However, few studies have compared bird–ectoparasite interactions between urban and rural individuals. Here, we analyze the ectoparasite community and co-infect...
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Aim Concern about the impacts of biological invasions has generated a great deal of interest in understanding factors that determine invasion success. Most of our current knowledge comes from static approaches that use spatial patterns as a proxy of temporal processes. These approaches assume that species are present in areas where environmental co...
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Parrots (Psittaciformes), with about 400 species widely distributed across continents and oceanic islands, stand out among birds for their poor conservation status [...]
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Wildlife trade is a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. To regulate its impact, laws and regulations have been implemented at the international and national scales. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has regulated the international legal trade since 1975. However, an important volume...
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Palms, like all plants, show coevolutionary relationships with animals that have been traditionally categorized as mutualistic (seed dispersers and pollinators) or antagonistic (seed predators). This dual perspective, however, has prevented a full understanding of their true interactions with some animal groups, mainly those that do not ingest enti...
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The transmission of pathogens to native species has been highlighted as one of the most important impacts of biological invasions. In this study, we evaluated the presence of psittacine beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) and other circoviruses in native bird species cohabiting with invasive populations of wild rose-ringed (Psittacula krameri) an...
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Population changes of invasive species can go unnoticed long before population explosions, so long-term monitoring programs are needed to assess changes in population size. Although invasive populations of rose-ringed (Psittacula krameri) and monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) are present worldwide, their current status and dynamics are mostly po...
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Species-specific population estimates are fundamental for many aspects of ecology, evolution, and conservation, yet they are lacking for most species. Aiming to fill this gap, Callaghan et al. (1) estimated global bird population sizes by modeling the relationship between eBird reporting rates and independent estimates and extrapolating globally. W...
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The global pet trade is a major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species. The composition of species selected for transport is driven by market demands, which may be influenced by a combination of both historical and cultural factors. We compared Eastern (Taiwan) and Western (Australia and the Iberian Peninsula) bird markets to explor...
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Certain traits of recipient environments, such as the availability of limiting resources, strongly determine the establishment success and spread of non-native species. These limitations may be overcome through behavioral plasticity, allowing them to exploit alternative resources. Here, we show how a secondary cavity nester bird, the rose-ringed pa...
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While most of the knowledge on invasive species focuses on their impacts, little is known about their potential positive effects on other species. Invasive ecosystem engineers can disrupt recipient environments; however, they may also facilitate access to novel resources for native species. The monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) is a worldwide inv...
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Parrots stand out among birds because of their poor conservation status and the lack of available information on their population sizes and trends. Estimating parrot abundance is complicated by the high mobility, gregariousness, patchy distributions, and rarity of many species. Roadside car surveys can be useful to cover large areas and increase th...
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Understanding of ecosystem structure and functioning requires detailed knowledge about plant–animal interactions, especially when keystone species are involved. The recent consideration of parrots as legitimate seed dispersers has widened the range of mechanisms influencing the life cycle of many plant species. We examined the interactions between...
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The order Psittaciformes is one of the most prevalent groups in the illegal wildlife trade. Efforts to understand this threat have focused on describing the elements of the trade itself: actors, extraction rates, and routes. However, the development of policy-oriented interventions also requires an understanding of how research aims and actions are...
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Plant–animal interactions are key to sustaining whole communities and ecosystem function. However, their complexity may limit our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and the species involved. The ecological effects of epizoochory remain little known compared to other seed dispersal mechanisms given the few vectors identified. In addition, ep...
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Falconry may constitute a source of exotic species through the escape into the wild of individuals kept in captivity. The introduction of top predators can have important ecological consequences for the recipient community, including genetic pollution through reproduction between falconry hybrids and wild raptors. Here we assessed the introduction...
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Natal dispersal, the movement between the birth and the first breeding site, has been rarely studied in long-lived territorial birds with a long-lasting pre-breeding stage. Here we benefited from the long-term monitoring programs of six populations of Egyptian vultures ( Neophron percnopterus ) from Spain and France to study how the rearing environ...
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Biological invasion is a global problem with large negative impacts on ecosystems and human societies. When a species is introduced, individuals will first have to pass through the invasion stages of uptake and transport, before actual introduction in a non‐native range. Selection is predicted to act during these earliest stages of biological invas...
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We are pleased to launch the new peer-reviewed open access journal, Conservation, published by MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute), which offers an exciting new opportunity to publish comprehensive reviews, original research articles, communications, case reports, letters, commentaries, and other perspectives related to the biolog...
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Introduced organisms have to overcome several obstacles, including the scarcity of conspecific mates before becoming successfully established. We recorded interspecific mating in non‐native areas (Spain) that involved Orange‐winged Amazons Amazona amazonica with three non‐congeneric parrot species: Scaly‐headed Parrot Pionus maximiliani, Rose‐ringe...
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Behavioural and socio-cultural traits are recognized in the restriction of gene flow in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies. This isolation by social barriers has been generally overlooked in threatened species by assuming disrupted gene flow due to population fragmentation and decline. We examine the genetic structure and ec...
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We present a dataset that assembles occurrence records of alien tetrapods (amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) in the Iberian Peninsula, a coherent biogeographically unit where introductions of alien species have occurred for millennia. These data have important potential applications for ecological research and management, including the asses...
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In some vertebrate species, family units are typically formed when sexually mature individuals delay dispersal and independent breeding to remain as subordinates in a breeding group. This behaviour has been intensively studied in gregarious species but has also been described in non-social species where ecological and evolutionary drivers are less...
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Aim No human activity has changed natural habitat availability and ecosystem functioning more than agriculture. As a consequence, species may be forced to use croplands as foraging habitat, resulting in potential conflicts with farmers. To assess the causes and consequences of wildlife–agriculture interactions, we investigated the underlying associ...
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Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a global priority. To meet this goal, the Spanish government is planning 89 GW of wind and solar photovoltaic energy in the draft of the National Integrated Energy and Climate Plan (PNIEC) for 2021–2030 (1). Despite the Spanish government's efforts to prevent a speculative bubble in the secondary market, there a...
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A set of 16 microsatellite markers was characterized for Lear's macaw (Anodorhynchus leari) using DNA samples from captive individuals. Extending this molecular toolkit, including the use of samples from wild individuals, is expected to provide the required power of resolution for pedigree inference of both wild and captive individuals, and could s...
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Illegal wildlife trade, which mostly focuses on high-demand species, constitutes a major threat to biodiversity. However, whether poaching is an opportunistic crime within high-demand taxa such as parrots (i.e., harvesting proportional to species availability in the wild), or is selectively focused on particular, more desirable species, is still un...
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Aims: Seed dispersal by endozoochory is an important process in plant regeneration and the establishment of new populations. Seeds with dormancy may especially benefit after disperser gut passage. However, the ways in which gut passage affect the germination of plant species with physiological dormancy remain unclear. Here, we experimentally assess...
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BACKGROUND Invasive Africanized honey bees potentially compete with cavity‐nesting birds in South America. However, the impacts caused by this competition and its conservation consequences to threatened species are poorly known. We quantified the presence of these bees and assessed its competition for cliff cavities used by nesting Lear's macaws An...
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Invasive Africanized honey bees potentially compete with cavity‐nesting birds in South America. However, the impacts caused by this competition and its conservation consequences to threatened species are poorly known. We quantified the presence of these bees and assessed its competition for cliff cavities used by nesting Lear's macaws Anodorhynchus...
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The hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal/interrenal (HPA) axis of vertebrates integrates external information and orches trates responses to cope with energy-demanding and stressful events through changes in circulating glucocorticoid levels. Urbanization exposes animals to a wide variety of ever-changing stimuli caused by human activities that may affec...
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Background: Non-native species are often introduced in cities, where they take advantage of microclimatic conditions, resources provided by humans, and competitor/predator release to establish and proliferate. However, native communities in the surrounding rural or natural areas usually halt their spread through biotic resistance, mainly via top-d...
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The psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD) is a globally widespread infectious bird disease that mainly affects species within the Order Psittaciformes (parrots and allies). The disease is caused by an avian circovirus (the beak and feather disease virus, BFDV), which is highly infectious and can lead to severe consequences in wild and captive...
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We assessed the relative importance of human activity and environmental suitability as drivers of compositional dissimilarity of alien birds for 65 of the most populous cities of the Iberian Peninsula. We examined how these drivers relate to Zeta diversity (f) for alien Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. We performed the analysis using multiple orde...
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When a species colonizes an urban habitat, differences in the environment can create novel selection pressures. Successful colonization will further lead to demographic perturbations and genetic drift, which can interfere with selection. Here, we test for consistent urban selection signals in multiple populations of the burrowing owl (Athene cunicu...
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Electrocution is one of the less known anthropogenic impacts likely affecting the bat population. We surveyed 925 km of overhead distribution power lines that supply energy to spreading urbanized areas in Sri Lanka, recording 300 electrocuted Indian flying foxes (Pteropus giganteus). Electrocutions were recorded up to 58 km from the nearest known c...
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Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are ‘megafauna’? Here, we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal resea...
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There is a growing need to understand how species respond to habitat changes and the potential key role played by natal dispersal in population dynamics, structure and gene flow. However, few studies have explored differences in this process between conspecifics living in natural habitats and those inhabiting landscapes highly transformed by humans...
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Establishing whether herb seed endozoochory is accidental or has evolved independently or in combination with other dispersal mechanisms may be valuable in the study of plant–animal interactions, but it remains unexplored for birds. We tested whether an Australian cockatoo, the galah (Eolophus roseicapilla), swallows entire seeds when feeding on ot...
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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The extinction of ecological functions is increasingly considered a major component of biodiversity loss, given its pervasive effects on ecosystems, and it may precede the disappearance of the species engaged. Dispersal of many large-fruited (>4 cm diameter) plants is thought to have been handicapped after the extinction of megafauna in the Late Pl...
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Editorial on the Research Topic Animal-Mediated Dispersal in Understudied Systems Animals disperse many smaller organisms by ingesting, transporting and egesting propagules (endozoochory) or by carrying propagules attached to their exterior (epizoochory). Both forms of animal-mediated dispersal are generally well-studied, but most previous work foc...
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Anecdotic citations of food wasting have been described for parrots, but we lack a comprehensive knowledge about the extent of this behaviour, and its ecological and evolutionary implications. Here, we combine experimental and observational approaches to evaluate the spatial, temporal, typological and taxonomic extent of food wasting by parrots, to...
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Wildlife trade is a profitable economic activity. Birds are among the most heavily traded animals worldwide, with numerous species threatened by pet trade. Information on both legal and illegal aspects of trade and consumer demand is difficult to obtain across different countries, particularly given substantial socio-economic and cultural variation...
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The dispersal of many large-seeded plants is thought to have been handicapped by the extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene, and due to the ongoing defaunation of the largest of the extant dispersers. Oversized fruits defined as “megafaunal” provide variable amounts of flesh even though many of them cannot be ingested entirely, nor their s...