José A Andrés

José A Andrés
University of Saskatchewan | U of S · Department of Biology

About

100
Publications
10,881
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1,916
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
711 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (100)
Article
Full-text available
Human assisted movement has allowed the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky)) to spread beyond its native range and become a globally regulated invasive pest. Within its native range of China and the Korean peninsula, human‐mediated dispersal has also caused cryptic translocation of insects, resulting in population s...
Article
Long‐distance dispersal (LDD) is consequential to metapopulation ecology and evolution. In systems where dispersal is undertaken by small propagules, such as larvae in the ocean, documenting LDD is especially challenging. Genetic parentage analysis has gained traction as a method for measuring larval dispersal, but such studies are generally spatia...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic data can help elucidate the dynamics of biological invasions, which are fueled by the constant expansion of international trade. The introduction of European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar dispar) into North America is a classic example of human‐aided invasion that has caused tremendous damage to North American temperate forests. Recently, th...
Article
Marine metapopulations often exhibit subtle population structure that can be difficult to detect. Given recent advances in high‐throughput sequencing, an emerging question is whether various genotyping approaches, in concert with improved sampling designs, will substantially improve our understanding of genetic structure in the sea. To address this...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Aposematic organisms advertise their defensive toxins to predators using a variety of warning signals, including bright coloration. While most Neotropical poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) rely on crypsis to avoid predators, Oophaga poison frogs from South America advertise their chemical defenses, a complex mix of diet-derived alkaloids, by u...
Article
Invasions can be genetically diverse, and that diversity may have implications for invasion management in terms of resistance or tolerance to control methods. We analyzed the population genetics of Russian-olive ( Elaeagnus angustifolia L.), an ecologically important and common invasive tree found in many western U.S. riparian areas. We found three...
Article
Eleven viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb isolates were sequenced, and their genetic variation explored to determine the source of a VHS outbreak on the eastern shore of Cayuga Lake. An active fish kill of round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus, Pallas) was intensively sampled at King Ferry, NY and nearby Long Point State Park i...
Article
In this paper we present an iterative method for delimiting species under the general lineage concept (GLC) based on the multivariate clustering of morphological, ecological, and genetic data. Our rationale is that distinct multivariate groups correspond to evolutionarily independent metapopulation lineages because they reflect the common signal of...
Article
Aposematic signals represent one of the classical systems to study evolution and, as such, they have received considerable empirical and theoretical investigation. Despite the extensive literature on aposematic coloration, much uncertainty remains about genetic changes responsible for the repeated evolution of similar signals in multiple lineages....
Article
Aim: Despite the incredible diversity of lowland tropical rain forests, we still have limited understanding of the drivers of speciation in these ecoregions. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of geographical and environmental factors to the diversification of a Neotropical genus of poison frogs (Oophaga). Location: Central and South A...
Preprint
A bstract We propose a iterative protocol for delimiting species under the generalized lineage concept (GLC) based on the multivariate clustering of morphological, ecological, and genetic data. Our rationale is that the resulting groups should correspond to evolutionarily independent metapopulation lineages because they reflect the common signal of...
Article
Full-text available
Background Seminal fluid proteins control many aspects of fertilization and in turn, they play a key role in post-mating sexual selection and possibly reproductive isolation. Because effective proteome profiling relies on the availability of high-quality DNA reference databases, our knowledge of these proteins is still largely limited to model orga...
Article
Full-text available
In damselflies, sexual colour dimorphism is commonly explained as a consequence of selection on traits that increase male attractiveness to females. However, while many species in the damselfly family Coenagrionidae (Insecta: Odonata) are sexually dimorphic, the males do not engage in displays, and male competition for mates resembles a "scramble"....
Article
Melanoplus sanquinipes oviposition stimulating protein (MsOSP) was characterized and its role in stimulating oviposition in virgin females was examined. A 967 nt MsOSP mRNA sequence with homology to previously characterized N-terminal amino acid sequence data for MsOSP was identified in a RNAseq library generated from an mRNA pool from the long hya...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Contemporary adaptation of plant-feeding insects to introduced hosts provides clear cases of ecologically based population divergence and speciation. However, the mechanisms that permit rapid evolution in response to altered selection, as well as the role of adaptation to native hosts in the ancestral populations, are often poorly known. Among the...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions can result in new selection pressures driven by the establishment of new biotic interactions. The response of exotic and native species to selection depends critically on the genetic architecture of ecologically relevant traits. In the Florida peninsula, the soapberry bug (Jadera haematoloma) has colonized the recently introduc...
Article
Hybrid zones act as genomic sieves. Although globally advantageous alleles will spread throughout the zone and neutral alleles can be freely exchanged between species, introgression will be restricted for genes that contribute to reproductive barriers or local adaptation. Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are known to contribute to reproductive barrier...
Article
Full-text available
Sympatric populations of phylogenetically related species are often vulnerable to similar communicable diseases. Although some host populations may exhibit spatial structure, other hosts within the community may have unstructured populations. Thus, individuals from unstructured host populations may act as interspecific vectors among discrete subpop...
Article
Contemporary adaptation of plant feeding insects to introduced hosts provides clear cases of ecologically based population divergence. In most cases the mechanisms permitting rapid differentiation are not well known. Here we study morphological and genetic variation associated with recent shifts by the Australian soapberry bug Leptocoris tagalicus...
Article
Full-text available
One of the central questions in evolutionary genetics is how much of the genome is involved in the early stages of divergence between populations, causing them to be reproductively isolated. In this paper we investigate genomic differentiation in a pair of closely related field crickets (Gryllus firmus and G. pennsylvanicus). These two species are...
Article
Full-text available
Post-copulatory interactions between males and females involve highly coordinated, complex traits that are often rapidly evolving and divergent between species. Failure to produce and deposit eggs may be a common post-mating prezygotic barrier, yet little is known about what prevents the induction of egg-laying between species. The field crickets,...
Article
Full-text available
It has been postulated that obligate asexual lineages may persist in the long term if they escape from negative interactions with either sexual lineages or biological enemies; and thus, parthenogenetic populations will be more likely to occur in places that are difficult for sexuals to colonize, or those in which biological interactions are rare, s...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms of pathogen transmission are often social behaviours. These occur at local scales and are affected by landscape-scale population structure. Host populations frequently exist in patchy and isolated environments that create a continuum of genetic and social familiarity. Such variability has an important multispatial effect on pathogen...
Article
Studies of sexual selection in speciation have traditionally focused on mate preference, with less attention given to traits that act between copulation and fertilization. However, recent work suggests that post-mating prezygotic barriers may play an important role in speciation. Here, we evaluate the role of such barriers in the field crickets, Gr...
Article
Full-text available
Colour polymorphism in vertebrates is usually under genetic control and may be associated with variation in physiological traits. The melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) has been involved repeatedly in melanin-based pigmentation but it was thought to have few other physiological effects. However, recent pharmacological studies suggest that MC1R could re...
Article
Microsatellite DNA loci are tandemly repeated simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. When flanked by unique sequences, length variation (driven by high rates of strand slippage during DNA replication) at a given repeat locus can be assayed by PCR and electrophoretic separation of the resulting DNA fragments (repre...
Article
Recent evidences suggest that dietary cadmium (Cd) uptake likely occurs via the dietary iron (Fe) uptake pathway in freshwater fish, at least in part. The present study investigated the interactive effects of dietary Cd and Fe in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were treated for four weeks with four different diets: normal Fe, hig...