Jose F Abisambra

Jose F Abisambra
University of Florida | UF · Department of Neuroscience

MS, PhD

About

78
Publications
14,460
Reads
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3,520
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2013 - present
University of Kentucky
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2010 - February 2013
University of South Florida
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2010 - January 2013
USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (78)
Article
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Background The initiation, anatomic pattern, and extent of tau spread in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the mechanism by which TBI leads to long-term tau pathology, remain controversial. Some studies suggest that moderate to severe TBI is sufficient to promote tau pathology; however, others suggest that it is simply a consequence of aging. We th...
Article
Graphical abstract Highlights d Tau oligomerization exhibits rapid aggregation of proteins linked to RNA metabolism d Oligomeric tau complexes with HNRNPA2B1 and m 6 A-RNA to regulate RNA translation d Knockdown of HNRNPA2B1 reduces the response to pathological tau d m 6 A progressively increases with disease severity in human AD brains In brief Ol...
Article
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Inhibition of the protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) ameliorates pathophysiologic and cognitive changes in aging rodents and mice with aging‐related Alzheimer's disease (AD)‐like pathology. However, concerns over adverse effects have slowed the transition of common CN‐inhibiting drugs to the clinic for the treatment of AD and AD‐related disorders...
Article
Tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by progressive accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and pathologic tau protein in association with onset of cognitive and behavioral impairment. Tau pathology is also associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and epilepsy, with tau−/− mice showing seizure resistance in some epi...
Article
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with memory impairment and altered peripheral metabolism. Mounting evidence indicates that abnormal signaling in a brain-periphery metabolic axis plays a role in AD pathophysiology. The activation of pro-inflammatory pathways in the brain, including the interleukin-6 (IL-6) pathway, comprises a potential point...
Article
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Tauopathies are a group of more than twenty known disorders that involve progressive neurodegeneration, cognitive decline and pathological tau accumulation. Current therapeutic strategies provide only limited, late-stage symptomatic treatment. This is partly due to lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking tau and cellular dysfuncti...
Article
Full-text available
List of Reviewers - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease 2020
Article
A major challenge in the field of tau‐associated neurodegeneration is the identification of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to disease. Tau is best known for associating and stabilizing microtubules; however, emerging results identifying alternate tau functions opens a new opportunity to understand the molecular basis of disease. Given the associ...
Article
Many neurodegenerative disorders in which aberrant protein conformers aggregate into pathological inclusions, such as tauopathies, also present endoplasmic reticulum stress and chronic activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The adaptive effects of the PERK pathway include reduction of translation by transient inhibiti...
Article
Hyperactivity of the protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) in brain directly corresponds to key neuropathological and clinical features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While inhibition of CN ameliorates pathophysiologic and cognitive changes in mice with AD‐like pathology, concerns over adverse effects have slowed the transition of common CN‐inhibiting...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tauopathies are a group of more than twenty known disorders that involve progressive neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and pathological tau accumulation. Current therapeutic strategies provide only limited, late-stage symptomatic treatment. This is partly due to lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking tau and cellular dysfunct...
Article
A major challenge in neurobiology is the identification of the mechanisms by which protein misfolding leads to cellular toxicity. Many neurodegenerative disorders, in which aberrant protein conformers aggregate into pathological inclusions, present the chronic activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response. The adaptive effects of t...
Article
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Frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) encompass several disorders commonly characterized by progressive frontotemporal lobar degeneration and dementia. Pathologically, TDP-43, FUS, dipeptide repeats, and tau constitute the protein aggregates in FTD, which in turn coincide with heterogeneity in clinical variants. The underlying molecular etiology explaini...
Article
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In humans, the majority of sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are classified as 'mild' and most often a result of a closed head injury (CHI). The effects of a non-penetrating CHI are not benign and may lead to chronic pathology and behavioral dysfunction, which could be worsened by repeated head injury. Clinical-neuropathological correlation...
Article
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Impairments in translation have been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Assessing the spatiotemporal dynamics of translation in the context of disease is a major challenge. Recent developments in proteomic analyses have enabled the resolution of nascent peptides in a short timescale o...
Article
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There is a fundamental gap in understanding the consequences of tau–ribosome interactions. Tau oligomers and filaments hinder protein synthesis in vitro, and they associate strongly with ribosomes in vivo. Here, we investigated the consequences of tau interactions with ribosomes in transgenic mice, in cells, and in human brain tissues to identify t...
Article
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Defective brain hormonal signaling has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a disorder characterized by synapse and memory failure. Irisin is an exercise-induced myokine released on cleavage of the membrane-bound precursor protein fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5), also expressed in the hippocampus. Here we show tha...
Article
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Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) rose to prominence in the 1990s as a sensitive approach to high contrast imaging. Following the discovery of manganese conductance through calcium-permeable channels, MEMRI applications expanded to include functional imaging in the central nervous system (CNS) and other body systems. MEMRI has s...
Article
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The development of insoluble, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau is a defining feature of tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Accumulating evidence suggests that tau pathology co-localizes with RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that are known markers for stress granules (SGs). Here we use...
Article
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Systematic epistasis analyses in multifactorial disorders are an important step to better characterize complex genetic risk structures. We conducted a hypothesis-free sex-stratified genome-wide screening for epistasis contributing to Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility. We identified a statistical epistasis signal between the single nucleotide...
Article
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Research into gene therapy for heart failure has gained renewed interest as a result of improved safety and availability of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV). While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is standard for functional assessment of gene therapy outcomes, quantitation of gene transfer/expression relies upon tissue biopsy, fluorescence or n...
Article
Down syndrome (DS) is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans, which results from the triplication of chromosome 21. DS individuals have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology and dementia by the age of 40 due to the triplication of several genes involv...
Article
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The importance of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative diseases is increasingly recognized, however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. There is growing evidence that in addition to Aβ deposition, accumulation of hyperphosphorylated oligomeri...
Article
Tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constitute the most crippling neurodegenerative threat to our aging population. Tauopathic patients have significant cognitive decline accompanied by irreversible and severe brain atrophy, and it is thought that neuronal dysfunction begins years before diagnosis. Our current underst...
Article
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Dendritic mislocalization of microtubule associated protein tau is a hallmark of tauopathies, but the role of dendritic tau is unknown. We now report that tau interacts with the RNA-binding protein (RBP) TIA1 in brain tissue, and we present the brain-protein interactome network for TIA1. Analysis of the TIA1 interactome in brain tissue from wild-ty...
Article
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A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive...
Article
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One of the most common symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies is memory loss. The exact mechanisms leading to memory loss in tauopathies are not yet known; however, decreased translation due to ribosomal dysfunction has been implicated as a part of this process. Here we use a proteomics approach that incorporates subcellular f...
Chapter
"Pick's disease" was originally conceptualized as a single pathological entity, but histopathological investigations failed to verify that construct. Instead, a wide variety of pathologies and phenotypical expressions were implicated. Cases with prototypical Pick's inclusions, seemingly uncommon, are now called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FT...
Article
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The unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a vital role in maintaining cell homeostasis as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, prolonged UPR activity leads to cell death. This time-dependent dual functionality of the UPR represents the adaptive and cytotoxic pathways that result from ER stress. Chronic UPR activation in syst...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is pathologically characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles. We recently identified that tau associates with proteins known to participate in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD); consequently, ERAD becom...
Article
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We recommend a new term, "primary age-related tauopathy" (PART), to describe a pathology that is commonly observed in the brains of aged individuals. Many autopsy studies have reported brains with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that are indistinguishable from those of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the absence of amyloid (Aβ) plaques. For these "NFT+...
Article
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This protocol details the extraction of microsomes from frozen tissue in order to further examine the protein-protein interactions occurring within the endoplasmic reticulum. This protocol was adapted from Abisambra et al. (2013) with modifications made in order to optimize for subsequent use.
Article
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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common form of head injury and is a leading cause of death worldwide. Due to the vast variability in the types and severity of trauma, the cellular consequences of head injury are not completely understood. The development of reliable models of TBI will aid in understanding the molecular consequences of head...
Article
Full-text available
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the mechanisms of neuronal loss remain largely unknown. Although tau pathology is closely correlated with neuronal loss, how its accumulation may lead to activation of neurotoxic pathways is unclear. Here we show that tau increased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the brain and triggered activation of the unfolde...
Article
Background: The microtubule-associated protein tau accumulates in neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer's disease. One way to treat these disorders may be to reduce abnormal tau levels through chaperone manipulation, thus subverting synaptic plasticity defects caused by tau's toxic accretion. Methods: T...
Article
Dysfunctional tau accumulation is a major contributing factor in tauopathies, and the heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) seems to play an important role in this accumulation. Several reports suggest that Hsp70 proteins can cause tau degradation to be accelerated or slowed, but how these opposing activities are controlled is unclear. Here we demonstrate...
Article
Clearance of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is traditionally handled by ER-associated degradation, a process that requires retro-translocation and ubiquitination mediated by a lumenal chaperone network. Here we investigated whether the secreted, glaucoma-associated protein myocilin was processed by this pathway. Myocilin is ty...
Article
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The RNA-binding protein, trans-active response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), is normally found in the nucleus, but in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontal temporal dementia, and some cases of Alzheimer disease it is cleaved and mislocalized to the cytosol, leading to accumulation. The mechanisms contributing to this are largely unknown. Here,...
Article
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Tau aggregation and amyloidogenesis are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. The molecular chaperone network constitutes the cellular defense against insults such as tau aggregation. However, chaperone effects on tau are dichotomous. Loss of tau's microtubule-binding activity facilitates an inappropriate chaperone in...
Article
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The heat shock protein (Hsp) family is an evolutionarily conserved system that is charged with preventing unfolded or misfolded proteins in the cell from aggregating. In Alzheimer's disease, extracellular accumulation of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and intracellular aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau may result from mechanisms inv...
Article
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The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of inner retinal circuitry are poorly understood. Reelin and apolipoprotein E (apoE), ligands of apoE receptor 2 (ApoER2), are involved in retinal development and degeneration, respectively. Here we describe the function of ApoER2 in the developing and adult retina. ApoER2 expres...
Article
https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/152875/1/alzjjalz2011051565.pdf
Article
Full-text available
The microtubule-associated protein tau, which becomes hyperphosphorylated and pathologically aggregates in a number of these diseases, is extremely sensitive to manipulations of chaperone signaling. For example, Hsp90 inhibitors can reduce the levels of tau in transgenic mouse models of tauopathy. Because of this, we hypothesized that a number of H...
Article
Target-based drug discovery for Alzheimer's disease (AD) centered on modulation of the amyloid β peptide has met with limited success. Therefore, recent efforts have focused on targeting the microtubule-associated protein tau. Tau pathologically accumulates in more than 15 neurodegenerative diseases and is most closely linked with postsymptomatic p...
Data
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Supplementary data on the administration of methylene blue in rTg4510 mice. Additional data contains information on the effect of chronic dosing of MB on behavior and statistical comparisons between parenchymal drug concentration, gender, and weight.
Article
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It has traditionally been thought that the pathological accumulation of tau in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies facilitates neurodegeneration, which in turn leads to cognitive impairment. However, recent evidence suggests that tau tangles are not the entity responsible for memory loss, rather it is an intermediate tau species that disrupts...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular chaperones regulate the aggregation of a number of proteins that pathologically misfold and accumulate in neurodegenerative diseases. Identifying ways to manipulate these proteins in disease models is an area of intense investigation; however, the translation of these results to the mammalian brain has progressed more slowly. In this stud...