José Mª Abad-Gómez

José Mª Abad-Gómez
Universidad de Extremadura | UNEX · Faculty of Science

PhD

About

32
Publications
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476
Citations

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Despite the widely recognized value of wetlands in providing vital ecosystem services, these are presently being degraded and ultimately destroyed, leading to a decrease in the biodiversity associated with these areas. Some species inextricably linked to wetlands, however, have been increasing and (re)colonizing areas across their range; a notable...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of animal dispersal patterns is of great importance for the conservation and maintenance of natural populations. We here analyze juvenile dispersal of the poorly studied Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus) monitored in southwestern Spain in an ongoing long-term study initiated in 2003. The European population of Black-shouldered kite...
Article
Renesting is an important strategy employed by many bird species to compensate for nest failure. However, although replacement clutches may increase an individual's annual reproductive success, they impose substantial energetic and fitness costs. In some cooperatively breeding species, helpers lighten breeders' workloads thereby facilitating a seco...
Article
Little is known about the migration and wintering distribution of Eurasian Scops Owls Otus scops. We deployed GPS-loggers on breeding Scops Owls from a southern Spanish population to analyse migratory routes and migration timing of this trans-Saharan migrant. Tag deployment had no short- or long-term effects on Scops Owls. Individuals followed rapi...
Article
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There is growing evidence on the role of legs and bill as 'thermal windows' in birds coping with heat stress. However, there is a lack of empirical work examining the relationship between the relative bill and/or leg surface areas and key thermoregulatory traits such as the limits of the thermoneutral zone (TNZ) or the cooling efficiency at high te...
Article
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The ‘wintering strategy hypothesis’ predicts that the body mass of long-distance migratory dabbling ducks is low in early winter, after autumn migration, increases in mid-winter and decreases again in late winter because of the high energetic demands of the pairing period. However, this hypothesis is assumed rather than demonstrated, since very few...
Article
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Abstract Partial migration, whereby some individuals migrate and some do not, is relatively common and widespread among animals. Switching between migration tactics (from migratory to resident or vice versa) occurs at individual and population levels. Here, we describe for the first time the movement ecology of the largest wintering population of E...
Article
Migratory shorebirds (Charadrii) show a strong dichotomy in their breeding and wintering strategies: Arctic-breeding species typically spend the wintering season in marine habitats, while more southerly breeding species tend to do so in freshwater habitats where pathogens and parasites, particularly vector-borne blood parasites, are generally more...
Article
Many bird species occupy habitats where environmental temperatures fall well below their thermoneutral zone (TNZ), so they must deal with high energy costs of thermoregulation to keep in heat balance. In such circumstances, specific dynamic action (SDA) - also referred to as heat increment of feeding - could be used to substitute for these high the...
Article
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Most species-climate models relate range margins to long-term mean climate but lack mechanistic understanding of the ecological or demographic processes underlying the climate response. We examined the case of a climatically limited edge-of-range population of a medium-sized grassland bird, for which climate responses may involve a behavioural trad...
Article
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Loss of natural wetlands is a global phenomenon that has severe consequences for waterbird populations and their associated ecosystem services. Although agroecosystems can reduce the impact of natural habitat loss, drivers of use of such artificial habitats by waterbirds remain poorly understood. Using the cosmopolitan northern pintail Anas acuta a...
Article
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Few studies have been able to directly measure the seasonal survival rates of migratory species or determine how variable the timing of migration is within individuals and across populations over multiple years. As such, it remains unclear how likely migration is to affect the population dynamics of migratory species and how capable migrants may be...
Article
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Human presence at intertidal areas could impact coastal biodiversity, including migratory waterbird species and the ecosystem services they provide. Assessing this impact is therefore essential to develop management measures compatible with migratory processes and associated biodiversity. Here, we assess the effects of human presence on the foragin...
Poster
Full-text available
There are growing evidences that the quality of the winter habitats could generate carry-over effects on migratory species, influencing the individual’s performance on the subsequent period of their annual-cycle. In addition, these carry-over effects can be specific of sex in those species with sexual dimorphism. Long-distance migrant birds are con...
Article
Full-text available
Salinization is having a major impact on wetlands and its biota worldwide. Specifically, many migratory animals that rely on wetlands are increasingly exposed to elevated salinity on their nonbreeding grounds. Experimental evidence suggests that physiological challenges associated with increasing salinity may disrupt self-maintenance processes in t...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme weather events have the potential to alter both short- and long-term population dynamics as well as community- and ecosystem-level function. Such events are rare and stochastic, making it difficult to fully document how organisms respond to them and predict the repercussions of similar events in the future. To improve our understanding of t...
Article
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Natural and anthropogenic Iberian wetlands in Southern Europe are well known for supporting large numbers of migratory Palearctic waterbirds each winter. However, information on the geographical origin of dabbling ducks overwintering in these wetlands is scarce and mostly limited to data from ringing recoveries. Here, we used intrinsic isotopic mar...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Despite host defense against parasites and pathogens being considered a costly life-history trait, relatively few studies have assessed the energetic cost of immune responsiveness. Knowledge of such energetic costs may help to understand the mechanisms by which trade-offs with other demanding activities occur. The time course and associate...
Article
There is a growing body of evidence that maternal antibodies transferred to offspring have potential implications in the evolutionary ecology of birds. This transfer of maternal antibodies is a potentially flexible mechanism of non-genetic inheritance by which mothers could favour some off spring over others and/or increase offspring survival, but...
Article
Full-text available
Many migratory waterbird populations are in decline and loss of natural wetlands is one of the main causes. However, some species may respond positively to artificial wetland recreation. In Extremadura (south-west Europe), several large reservoirs were created for irrigation since the 1960s and some comparatively small reservoirs were built from th...
Article
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Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is closely linked to different habitats and way of life. In birds, some studies have noted that BMR is higher in marine species compared to those inhabiting terrestrial habitats. However, the extent of such metabolic dichotomy and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Migratory shorebirds (Charadriiformes) offer...
Data
Phylogeny for the A 39 species (92 tips) of shorebirds included in the “full dataset” and for the B 25 species (39 tips) included in the “wintering dataset”. Both trees were derived from the shorebird supertree developed by Thomas et al. [1]. Branch lengths specified by Pagel’s [2] arbitrary method. (RTF)
Data
Data on body mass (Mass; g), basal metabolic rate (BMR; W), habitat (0 = coastal, 1 = inland), migratory status (Status; 0 = migratory period, 1 = wintering period), latitude (N-S), longitude (E-W), radiation (W m−2), mean temperature (Tmean; °C), minimum temperature (Tmin; °C), maximum temperature (Tmax; °C), and windspeed (Wind; ms−1) for shorebi...
Article
Full-text available
Salt stress can suppress the immune function of fish and other aquatic animals, but such an effect has not yet been examined in air-breathing vertebrates that frequently cope with waters (and prey) of contrasting salinities. We investigated the effects of seawater salinity on the strength and cost of mounting an immune response in the dunlin Calidr...
Article
Full-text available
Investment in immunity is commonly viewed as an energetically costly activity in birds. Although several studies have focused on the energy cost of mounting an immune response and its concomitant physiological trade-offs, nothing is known about the metabolic adjustments experienced by immunochallenged birds under resource limitation, or about the b...
Article
Full-text available
Many migratory vertebrates typically move between habitats with varying salinities during the annual cycle. These organisms clearly exhibit a remarkable phenotypic flexibility in their 'osmoregulatory machinery', but the metabolic consequences of salinity acclimatization are still not well understood. We investigated the effects of salinity on basa...
Article
Full-text available
Rice fields provide functional wetlands for declining shorebirds and other waterbirds around the world, but fundamental aspects of their stopover ecology in rice fields remain unknown. We estimated the length of stay of Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa migrating through rice fields, and showed the international importance of Extremadura's rice fi...
Article
Full-text available
Hosts may use two different strategies to ameliorate negative effects of a given parasite burden: resistance or tolerance. Although both resistance and tolerance of parasitism should evolve as a consequence of selection pressures owing to parasitism, the study of evolutionary patterns of tolerance has traditionally been neglected by animal biologis...
Article
Full-text available
Most black-tailed godwits Limosa limosa en route from West Africa to breeding grounds cross Iberia (Spain and Portugal), but there are fundamental aspects of the stopover ecology of black-tailed godwits in Iberia which remain unknown. Geographical origin, return rates, and movements of the near-threatened black-tailed godwits staying at Extremadura...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The general aim of this project is to evaluate the patterns of inter -and intraspecific variation in the limits of thermal tolerance and the physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the phenotypic plasticity of thermoregulatory traits in response to heat, in common birds of Mediterranean environments
Project
The aim of this project is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the thermoregulatory performance of migratory and sedentary birds in a context of global warming.
Project
This project aims at deepening our understanding of how dietary n-3 LCPUFAs affects physiological function and cascades to determine flight performance in migratory animals, and how migratory species without dietary access to n-3 LCPUFAs can obtain these fatty acids to improve their health and survival prospects, with state-of-the-art physiological tools.