Jory Cabrol

Jory Cabrol
Fisheries and Oceans Canada | DFO · Maurice Lamontagne Institute (MLI)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
2,713
Reads
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99
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
81 Citations
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Introduction
My research interests are on the importance of natural or anthropogenic constraints in processes that continually (re)structure pelagic marine food webs. Much of my work focuses on the ecophysiology and trophic ecology of zooplankton species (cryptic copepods species, krill) in subarctic environments, and more recently on marine mammals, especially Beluga and Fin whales.
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2019 - August 2019
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Position
  • Researcher
September 2014 - September 2014
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Different krill species have a pivotal position in many marine food webs by both preying upon several tro-phic levels and being forage species for consumers. Within these food webs, different krill species coexist, though it remains unclear what mechanisms allow for the coexistence, for instance, of northern krill species in subarctic environments....
Article
Krill, as forage species, play a pivotal role in marine food webs by linking lower to upper trophic levels. Despite their ecological relevance, processes affecting their physiological condition and their feeding selectivity remain not well known. Here, we hypothesize that significant spatial fluctuations of environmental conditions in a Subarctic r...
Article
Full-text available
Krill species play a pivotal role in energetic transfer from lower to upper trophic levels. However, functional feeding responses, which determine how food availability influences ingestion rates, are still not well defined for northern krill species. Here, we estimated and compared the functional feeding responses on natural communities of phytopl...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the short-term performances and the physiological plasticity of two cryptic species Eurytemora carolleeae and Eurytemora affinis (North-Atlantic clade) by simulating rapid advection from freshwater to brackish water conditions and reciprocally. To do so, two reciprocal transplant experiments withou...
Article
Full-text available
The cryptic species complex, Eurytemora affinis is an important component of the mesozooplankton of estuarine transition zones (ETZs). In the St Lawrence ETZ, two clades, the Atlantic and the North-Atlantic clades co-occur. However, their distribution along environmental gradients is spatially segregated, potentially because of differential habitat...
Article
Full-text available
Very high levels of industrial contaminants in St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE) beluga whales represent one of the major threats to this population classified as endangered under the Species at Risk Act in Canada. Elevated concentrations of short-chained chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) were recently reported in blubber of adult male SLE belugas. Recent reg...
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to estimate the effect of an anthropogenic and climate-driven change in prey availability on the degree of individual and population specialization of a large marine predator, the fin whale ( Balaenoptera physalus ). We examined skin biopsies from 99 fin whales sampled in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada) over a nine year period (...
Data
Description This study sought to estimate the effect of an anthropogenic and climate-driven change in prey availability on the degree of individual and population specialization of a large marine predator, the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) in the estuary and the gulf of St. Lawrence (eastern Canada). Specifically, we here examine the trophic ni...
Article
The endangered St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE) beluga population is declining and has shown no sign of recovery over the past decades despite several protective measures. Changes in the availability of food resources and exposure to organohalogen contaminants have been suggested as potential factors limiting the recovery of this population. Studies on S...
Article
The Nordic krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica and Arctic krill Thysanoessa raschii both dominate the krill community within the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence system where they are central forage species for its pelagic ecosystem. We developed a species‐specific physiological individual based model that implements the critical physiological processe...
Poster
Spatio-temporal variations of the physiological condition and the feeding behaviour of Meganyctiphanes norvegica in the gulf of St. Lawrence
Presentation
Full-text available
In subarctic ecosystems, the krill communities are composed of many species, ranging from temperate to arctic, with diverse morphology and ecology. These krill species may express differential eco-physiological traits, which in turn may vary with strong seasonal changes in temperature and food supply in these environments. To enhance our capacity t...
Article
Full-text available
Le copepode calanoide Eurytemora affinis est un complexe d’especes cles des reseaux trophiques estuariens. En dominant les communautes planctoniques dans la plupart des estuaires de l’hemisphere nord, E. affinis permet un transfert d’energies vers les niveaux trophiques superieurs. Il influence directement le recrutement des especes de poissons et...
Presentation
Full-text available
Krill as forage species play a key role in energy transfer to higher trophic levels in marine ecosystems. In the St. Lawrence estuary, three krill species (Meganyctiphanes norvegica, Thysanoessa raschii, Thysanoessa inermis) coexist and dominate the macrozooplankton biomass. Although, these species are ecologically important, the dynamics of their...
Poster
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence estuarine transition zone includes the interface between the freshwater and the brackish. The euryhaline and dominant copepod Eurytemora affinis occurs throughout the entire transition zone, but E. affinis is a sibling species complex with two morphologically similar but genetically distinct clades. The E. caroleeae and the North-A...
Poster
Full-text available
The lower St. Lawrence estuary (LSLE) is influenced by river discharge and saltwater inflow. Together with arctic water inflow and ice cover in winter, a strong stratification occurs resulting in a cold intermediate layer (CIL) from spring to autumn. This stratification provides thermal habitats. Here, we focus on two krill species Thysanoessa rasc...
Article
Full-text available
The family Oscarellidae is one of the two families in the class Homoscleromorpha (phylum Porifera) and is characterized by the absence of a skeleton and the presence of a specific mitochondrial gene, tatC. This family currently encompasses sponges in two genera: Oscarella with 17 described species and Pseudocorticium with one described species. Alt...
Data
Full-text available
Mesquite matrix for some morphological characters from Tables 2 and 3. Characters and characters-states are detailed. (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Mesquite matrix for V4 secondary structures for 18S rDNA. (PDF)

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Although Krill play a pivot role in marine food webs they still an understudied group of species. In North-Atlantic region, krill communities are mostly dominated by three species which coexist in sympatry. The main goal of this project is i) determine the feeding strategies and ii) elucidate the lipid reserve dynamics of the three krill species in relation to marked spatio-temporal changes of the environmental conditions.