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Jornt J Mandemakers

Jornt J Mandemakers
Atlas Research

PhD

About

35
Publications
7,922
Reads
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894
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
743 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - March 2021
Utrecht University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2014 - March 2017
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2011 - August 2014
University of Groningen
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
This study explores which factors affect employees' intention to participate in worksite health promotion (WHP) when they work from home. Employees increasingly work from home, yet existing WHP is mainly tied to the workplace. We lack knowledge on what might stimulate employees to make use of WHP specifically when they work from home. Drawing on th...
Article
Full-text available
In many societies child nutritional status varies between siblings because of parental gender and birth order preferences and differential intra-household resource allocation. While more educated women have been found to improve children's nutrition overall, it is unclear whether they also buffer sibling inequalities in nutritional status. We study...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To study whether workplace social relations explain use of worksite health promotion (WHP), by examining colleagues' and team managers' WHP encouragement of a healthy lifestyle, and colleague WHP uptake. Methods: Multilevel data came from the second wave of the European Sustainable Workforce Survey (4345 employees of 402 team in 9 cou...
Article
Full-text available
It is well-documented that higher educated employees have better health than the lower educated. The workplace has been put forward as a contributor to this inequality. We extend previous work on workplace characteristics that could influence employee health by asking to what extent workplace health promotion (WHP) can account for the relation betw...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social contagion research suggests that health behaviors (BMI, smoking, drinking, etc.) spread through social networks, including dyadic ties such as between married/cohabiting partners. However, separating contagion from assortative mating ('like seeks like') and shared environmental factors remains notoriously difficult in observational studies....
Chapter
A healthy workforce is in the interest of employers and employees alike. We investigate what organizations do in promoting and facilitating employee health by studying the availability of Worksite Health Promotion (WHP) in European organizations. We focus on four types of WHP programs: healthy nutrition, sports participation, ergonomic facilities a...
Article
Many pregnant Muslim women fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. A number of studies have reported negative life outcomes in adulthood for children who were prenatally exposed to Ramadan. However, other studies document minimal to no impact on neonatal indicators. Using data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey consisting of 45,246 observ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines whether the simultaneous occurrence of two or more adverse life course transitions has a stronger effect on mental health compared to the effects of the sum of each. The focus is on four life course transitions (partner loss (divorce/separation or death), death of a parent, unemployment, disability) and the data come from a larg...
Article
Higher educated people tend to be more accepting of homosexuality than lower educated people. This has inspired claims that education leads to a higher acceptance of homosexuality. Alternatively, the association between education and acceptance of homosexuality could be confounded by (un)observed family background and stable individual characterist...
Preprint
Full-text available
A large body of literature has demonstrated a positive relationship between education and age at first birth. However, this relationship may be partly spurious because of family background factors that cannot be controlled for in most research designs. We investigate the extent to which education is causally related to later age at first birth in a...
Article
A large body of literature has demonstrated a positive relationship between education and age at first birth. However, this relationship may be partly spurious because of family background factors that cannot be controlled for in most research designs. We investigate the extent to which education is causally related to later age at first birth in a...
Article
Rationale: Successful transmission of tuberculosis depends on the interplay of human behavior, host immune responses and Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence factors. Previous studies have focused on identifying host risk factors associated with increased transmission, while the contribution of specific genetic variations in mycobacterial strains...
Article
Full-text available
The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior—age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)—has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood...
Article
Full-text available
This study contributes to our knowledge on the association between parenthood and psychological well-being by examining whether pre-parenthood lifestyles (leisure and paid work) moderate the transition to parenthood. We expected that people with less active lifestyles would find it easier to adapt to the demands of parenthood. Using eleven waves of...
Article
Full-text available
Jonge kinderen vergroten de negatieve gevolgen van scheiding voor het welbevinden van de ex-partners. Onderzoek op basis van de Netherlands Kinship Panel Study wijst dat uit. Vooral het welbevinden van moeders van jonge kinderen gaat er sterk op achteruit. Voor mannen en vrouwen zonder jonge kinderen zijn er geen nadelige effecten te traceren.Jonge...
Article
Full-text available
p>This study contributes to our knowledge on the association between parenthood and psychological well-being by examining whether pre-parenthood lifestyles (leisure and paid work) moderate the transition to parenthood. We expected that people with less active lifestyles would find it easier to adapt to the demands of parenthood. Using eleven waves...
Article
Full-text available
LifeLines is a large prospective population-based three generation cohort study in the north of the Netherlands. Different recruitment strategies were adopted: recruitment of an index population via general practitioners, subsequent inclusion of their family members, and online self-registration. Our aim was to investigate the representativeness of...
Article
Full-text available
Using a sample of monozygotic (945, 42 per cent) and dizygotic (1,329, 58 per cent) twin pairs born 1919-68 in the UK, we applied innovative tobit models to investigate genetic and environmental influences on age at first birth (AFB). We found that a substantial part (40 per cent) of the variation in AFB is caused by latent family characteristics....
Article
Full-text available
The current study analysed trends in the time spent preparing and consuming food and the frequency of outsourcing (going out for dinner and take-out) in the Netherlands from 1975 to 2005. We investigated differences between trends on week and weekend days and for different socio-demographic groups. Analyses using pooled data from the Dutch Time Use...
Article
We use the British Cohort Study to investigate to what extent parental resources moderate the association between parental divorce in childhood and lowered child well-being as indicated by maternal reports of child psychological well-being and by academic test scores (reading and math tests). We argue that children of mothers with more years of edu...
Article
Full-text available
Background One of the most widespread clades of Mycobacterium tuberculosis worldwide, the Beijing genotype family, consists of ancient ('atypical') and modern ('typical') strains. Modern Beijing strains outcompete ancient strains in terms of prevalence, while reserving a higher degree of genetic conservation. We hypothesize that their selective adv...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the impact of involuntary job loss on psychological distress and investigate whether the impact differs by educational level using a sample of men drawn from the British Household Panel Study. We expect higher-educated men to suffer less from job loss because they have more resources and better re-employment chances. Alternatively, it co...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates whether education buffers the impact of physical disability on psychological distress. It further investigates what makes education helpful, by examining whether cognitive ability and occupational class can explain the buffering effect of education. Two waves of the 1958 British National Child Development Study are used to t...
Article
This paper investigates whether an adverse family background amplifies the distressing effects of divorce. We use several waves (at age 0, 7, 11, 16, 33, and 42) of the British National Child Development Study to study the effect of divorce on psychological distress in middle adulthood (between ages 33 and 42). We measure family background with ind...
Article
This study uses data on support and contact in 4,055 parent-child dyads drawn from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study to test explanations of reporting discrepancies, which focus on sources of bias and inaccurate reporting. Contrary to the generational stake hypothesis, parents’ reports are not characterized by a general positive bias. Consistent...
Conference Paper
Gegevens over intergenerationele steun en contact in 4.055 ouder-kind dyades afkomstig van de Netherlands Kinship Panel Study zijn gebruikt om verklaringen te toetsen voor rapportageverschillen. De verklaringen richten zich op bronnen van vertekening en van onnauwkeurigheid. De resultaten laten geen systematische overschatting zien van steun en con...
Article
Full-text available
Summary Bias and inaccuracy of parent’s and child’s reports of intergenerational support and contact This paper uses data on intergenerational support and contact in 4,055 parent-child dyads drawn from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study to test explanations of response discrepancies in paired parent and child reports of intergenerational support a...
Conference Paper
Previous research using paired parent-child data has established discrepancies in the reporting of obligations, support, and contact. Little is known, however about the effects of report discrepancies on parental well-being. Our study has two working hypotheses. The first is that social reality matters, implying that accuracy of reporting is the be...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
examine whether there are socio-economic differences in the impact of adverse life course transistions on well-being
Archived project
Many pregnant Muslim women fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. A number of studies suggest negative long-lasting effects on the health of those who were exposed in utero to Ramadan fasting (Ewijk, 2011). However, other studies dispute these claims as they report no differences in birth weight (Jürges, 2015). This study contributes to the ongoing debate on prenatal Ramadan exposure by presenting the first longitudinal evidence on child health (height-for-age and BMI-for-age) from early childhood into late adolescence. This study considers the social context in greater detail than previous studies by examining actual religious practices and cohort effects. We use the Indonesian Family Life Survey to analyse consequences of prenatal Ramadan exposure in a sample of 17,512 children born to 8,363 mothers. In mother fixed-effects models we find a negative effect for height-for-age, but only for children born in the older birth cohort and only in late adolescence and only for children of mothers who prayed at least five times a day. Their height-for-age is in average, 0.158 SD shorter compared to their siblings. We do not find any negative effect on BMI-for-age. Our findings support a more nuanced interpretation of possible negative prenatal Ramadan effects.
Project
Women’s position is seen as key to improved child nutrition. However, in many cultures child nutritional status also varies by gender and birth order because of specific food distribution patterns, care giving practices, and access to formal health care. Whereas female empowerment may be expected to increase household resources for children, it is unclear whether it also compensates the nutrition security of the worst-off children in the household. Does having a more empowered mother straighten sibling inequalities in nutritional status? We base our analysis on a pooled sample of the 2011/12 and 2013/14 waves of the Ethiopian Rural Socioeconomic Survey (ERSS) using 5,966 observations from 4,200 children nested in 2,607 households. Children’s nutritional status was assessed by means of WHO reference population standardized measures for height-for age and weight-for-age. Women’s educational level, her age at childbirth, and spousal age gap were used as indicators for women’s position. A child’s sibling position was defined by gender and birth order. In general, girls do worse than boys both in terms of height-for-age and weight-for-age. Random-effect models show that children with better educated and older mothers had significantly better nutritional outcomes. In a second step household fixed-effect models were estimated to control for all observed and unobserved household characteristics. Results show that the higher the parity, the lower the height-for-age and weight-for-age z–scores of both boys and girls. Analyses including interactions with mother’s education and age show that there is indeed compensation within the sibling set when the mother is better educated; maternal education decreases the boy-advantage and the earlier-born advantage, particularly for girls. Our findings show that mother’s position not only improves children’s nutritional status, which has been found before, but that empowerment also straightens out long-lasting sibling inequalities, particularly ameliorating the health position of later-born girls in households.